• We have conducted a search for L subdwarf candidates within the photometric catalogues of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Six of our candidates are confirmed as L subdwarfs spectroscopically at optical and/or near infrared wavelengths. We also present new optical spectra of three previously known L subdwarfs (WISEA J001450.17-083823.4, 2MASS J00412179+3547133, ULAS J124425.75+102439.3). We examined the spectral types and metallicity subclasses classification of known L subdwarfs. We summarised the spectroscopic properties of L subdwarfs with different spectral types and subclasses. We classify these new L subdwarfs by comparing their spectra to known L subdwarfs and L dwarf standards. We estimate temperatures and metallicities of 22 late type M and L subdwarfs by comparing their spectra to BT-Settl models. We find that L subdwarfs have temperatures between 1500 K and 2700 K, which are higher than similarly-typed L dwarfs by around 100-400 K depending on different subclasses and subtypes. We constrained the metallicity ranges of subclasses of M, L and T subdwarfs. We also discussed the spectral type and absolute magnitude relationships for L and T subdwarfs.
  • In this paper we describe the architecture of a Platform as a Service (PaaS) oriented to computing and data analysis. In order to clarify the choices we made, we explain the features using practical examples, applied to several known usage patterns in the area of HEP computing. The proposed architecture is devised to provide researchers with a unified view of distributed computing infrastructures, focusing in facilitating seamless access. In this respect the Platform is able to profit from the most recent developments for computing and processing large amounts of data, and to exploit current storage and preservation technologies, with the appropriate mechanisms to ensure security and privacy.
  • We present a new Y dwarf, WISE J030449.03-270508.3, confirmed from a candidate sample designed to pick out low temperature objects from the WISE database. The new object is typed Y0pec following a visual comparison with spectral standards, and lies at a likely distance of 10-17 pc. Its tangential velocity suggests thin disk membership, but it shows some spectral characteristics that suggest it may be metal-poor and/or older than previously identified Y0 dwarfs. Based on trends seen for warmer late type T dwarfs, the Y-band flux peak morphology is indicative of sub-solar metallicity, and the enhanced red wing of the J-band flux peak offers evidence for high gravity and/or low metallicity (with associated model trends suggesting an age closer to ~10 Gyr and mass in the range 0.02-0.03 Mo). This object may thus be extending the population parameter-space of the known Y0 dwarfs.
  • A method is defined for identifying late T and Y dwarfs in WISE down to low values of signal-to-noise. This requires a WISE detection only in the W2-band and uses the statistical properties of the WISE multi-frame measurements and profile fit photometry to reject contamination resulting from non-point-like objects, variables and moving sources. To trace our desired parameter space we use a control sample of isolated non-moving non-variable point sources from the SDSS, and identify a sample of 158 WISE W2-only candidates down to a signal-to-noise limit of 8. For signal-to-noise ranges >10 and 8-10 respectively, ~45% and ~90% of our sample fall outside the selection criteria published by the WISE team (Kirkpatrick et al. 2012), due mainly to the type of constraints placed on the number of individual W2 detections. We present follow-up of eight candidates and identify WISE 0013+0634 and WISE 0833+0052, T8 and T9 dwarfs with high proper motion (~1.3 and ~1.8 arcsec/yr). Both objects show a mid-infrared/near-infrared excess of ~1-1.5 magnitudes, and are K-band suppressed. Distance estimates lead to space motion constraints that suggest halo (or at least thick disk) kinematics. We then assess the reduced proper motion diagram of WISE ultracool dwarfs, which suggests that late T and Y dwarfs may have a higher thick-disk/halo population fraction than earlier objects.
  • Red subdwarfs in binary systems are crucial for both model calibration and spectral classification. We search for red subdwarfs in binary systems from a sample of high proper motion objects with Sloan digital Sky Survey spectroscopy. We present here discoveries from this search, as well as highlight several additional objects of interest. We find 30 red subdwarfs in wide binary systems including: two with spectral type of esdM5.5, 6 companions to white dwarfs and 3 carbon enhanced red subdwarfs with normal red subdwarf companions. 15 red subdwarfs in our sample are partially resolved close binary systems. With this binary sample, we estimate the low limit of the red subdwarf binary fraction of ~ 10%. We find that the binary fraction goes down with decreasing masses and metallicities of red subdwarfs. A spectroscopic esdK7 subdwarf + white dwarf binary candidate is also reported. 30 new M subdwarfs have spectral type of >= M6 in our sample. We also derive relationships between spectral types and absolute magnitudes in the optical and near-infrared for M and L subdwarfs, and we present an M subdwarf sample with measured U, V, W space velocities.
  • We report the discovery of 76 new T dwarfs from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey (LAS). Near-infrared broad and narrow-band photometry and spectroscopy are presented for the new objects, along with WISE and warm-Spitzer photometry. Proper motions for 128 UKIDSS T dwarfs are presented from a new two epoch LAS proper motion catalogue. We use these motions to identify two new benchmark systems: LHS 6176AB, a T8+M4 pair and HD118865AB, a T5.5+F8 pair. Using age constraints from the primaries and evolutionary models to constrain the radii we have estimated their physical properties from their bolometric luminosity. We compare the colours and properties of known benchmark T dwarfs to the latest model atmospheres and draw two principal conclusions. Firstly, it appears that the H - [4.5] and J - W2 colours are more sensitive to metallicity than has previously been recognised, such that differences in metallicity may dominate over differences in Teff when considering relative properties of cool objects using these colours. Secondly, the previously noted apparent dominance of young objects in the late-T dwarf sample is no longer apparent when using the new model grids and the expanded sample of late-T dwarfs and benchmarks. This is supported by the apparently similar distribution of late-T dwarfs and earlier-type T dwarfs on reduced proper motion diagrams that we present. Finally, we present updated space densities for the late-T dwarfs, and compare our values to simulation predictions and those from WISE.
  • We present a new sample of mid L to mid T dwarfs with effective temperatures of 1100 to 1700K selected from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey and confirmed with infrared spectra from X-Shooter/VLT. This effective temperature range is especially sensitive to the formation history of Galactic brown dwarfs and allows us to constrain the form of the sub-stellar birth rate, with sensitivity to differentiate between a flat (stellar like) birth rate, and an exponentially declining form. We present the discovery of 63 new L and T dwarfs from the UKIDSS LAS DR7, including the identification of 12 likely unresolved binaries, which form the first complete sub-set from our program, covering 495 sq degrees of sky, complete to J=18.1. We compare our results for this sub-sample with simulations of differing birth rates for objects of mass 0.10-0.03Msol and ages 1-10Gyrs. We find that the more extreme birth rates (e.g. a halo type form) can likely be excluded as the true form of the birth rate. In addition we find that although there is substantial scatter we find a preference for a mass function, with a power-law index, alpha in the range -1 < alpha < 0 that is consistent (within the errors) with the studies of late T dwarfs.
  • We report the identification of LSR J0745+2627 in the United Kingdom InfraRed Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) as a cool white dwarf with kinematics and age compatible with the thick-disk/halo population. LSR J0745+2627 has a high proper motion (890 mas/yr) and a high reduced proper motion value in the J band (H_J=21.87). We show how the infrared-reduced proper motion diagram is useful for selecting a sample of cool white dwarfs with low contamination. LSR J0745+2627 is also detected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We have spectroscopically confirmed this object as a cool white dwarf using X-Shooter on the Very Large Telescope. A detailed analysis of its spectral energy distribution reveals that its atmosphere is compatible with a pure-H composition model with an effective temperature of 3880+-90 K. This object is the brightest pure-H ultracool white dwarf (Teff<4000 K) ever identified. We have constrained the distance (24-45 pc), space velocities and age considering different surface gravities. The results obtained suggest that LSR J0745+2627 belongs to the thick-disk/halo population and is also one of the closest ultracool white dwarfs.
  • We have searched the WISE first data release for widely separated (<10,000AU) late T dwarf companions to Hipparcos and Gliese stars. We have discovered a new binary system containing a K-band suppressed T8p dwarf WISEP J1423+0116 and the mildly metal poor ([Fe/H]=-0.38+-0.06) primary BD+01 2920 (Hip 70319), a G1 dwarf at a distance of 17.2pc. This new benchmark has Teff=680+-55K and a mass of 20-50 Mjup. Its spectral properties are well modelled except for known discrepancies in the Y and K bands. Based on the well determined metallicity of its companion, the properties of BD+01 2920B imply that the currently known T dwarfs are dominated by young low-mass objects. We also present an accurate proper motion for the T8.5 dwarf WISEP J075003.84+272544.8.
  • We present near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy, and warm-Spitzer IRAC photometry of the young very cool T dwarf Ross 458C, which we have typed as T8.5p. By applying the fiducial age constraints (< 1Gyr) imposed by the properties of the active M dwarf Ross 458A, we have used these data to determine that Ross 458C has Teff = 695 \pm 60K, log g = 4.0 - 4.7 and an inferred mass of 5-20 MJup. We have compared fits of the near-infrared spectrum and IRAC photometry to the BT Settl and Saumon & Marley model grids, and have found that both sets provide best fits that are consistent with our derived properties, whilst the former provide a marginally closer match to the data for all scenarios explored here. The main difference between the model grids arises in the 4.5{\mu}m region, where the BT Settl models are able to better predict the flux through the IRAC filter, suggesting that non-equilibrium effects on the CO-CO2 ratio are important for shaping the mid-infrared spectra of very cool T dwarfs. We have also revisited the issue of dust opacity in the spectra of Ross 458C that was raised by Burgasser et al (2010). We have found that the BT Settl models which also incorporate a condensate cloud model, provide a better match to the near-infrared spectrum of this target than the Saumon & Marley model with fsed = 2, and we briefly discuss the influence of condensate clouds on T dwarf spectra.
  • We have carried out a search for late-type T dwarfs in the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey 6th Data Release. The search yielded two persuasive candidates, both of which have been confirmed as T dwarfs. The brightest, UGPS J0521+3640 has been assigned the spectral type T8.5 and appears to lie at a distance of 7-9 pc. The fainter of the two, UGPS J0652+0324, is classified as a T5.5 dwarf, and lies at an estimated distance of 28-37 pc. Warm-Spitzer observations in IRAC channels 1 and 2, taken as part of the GLIMPSE360 Legacy Survey, are available for UGPS J0521+3640 and we used these data with the near-infrared spectroscopy to estimate its properties. We find best fitting solar metallicity BT-Settl models for Teff = 600K and 650K and log g = 4.5 and 5.0. These parameters suggest a mass of between 14 and 32 MJup for an age between 1 and 5 Gyr. The proximity of this very cool T dwarf, and its location in the Galactic plane makes it an ideal candidate for high resolution adaptive optics imaging to search for cool companions.
  • We present the discovery of the first T dwarf + white dwarf binary system LSPM 1459+0857AB, confirmed through common proper motion and spectroscopy. The white dwarf is a high proper motion object from the LSPM catalogue that we confirm spectroscopically to be a relatively cool (Teff=5535+\-45K) and magnetic (B~2MG) hydrogen-rich white dwarf, with an age of at least 4.8Gyrs. The T dwarf is a recent discovery from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (ULAS 1459+0857), and has a spectral type of T4.5+\-0.5 and a distance in the range 43-69pc. With an age constraint (inferred from the white dwarf) of >4.8Gyrs we estimate Teff=1200-1500K and logg=5.4-5.5 for ULAS 1459+0857, making it a benchmark T dwarf with well constrained surface gravity. We also compare the T dwarf spectra with the latest LYON group atmospheric model predictions, which despite some shortcomings are in general agreement with the observed properties of ULAS 1459+0857. The separation of the binary components (16,500-26,500AU, or 365 arcseconds on the sky) is consistent with an evolved version of the more common brown dwarf + main-sequence binary systems now known, and although the system has a wide separation, it is shown to be statistically robust as a non spurious association. The observed colours of the T dwarf show that it is relatively bright in the z band compared to other T dwarfs of similar type, and further investigation is warranted to explore the possibility that this could be a more generic indicator of older T dwarfs. Future observations of this binary system will provide even stronger constraints on the T dwarf properties, and additional systems will combine to give a more comprehensively robust test of the model atmospheres in this temperature regime.