• Since 2013, observations of Neptune with small telescopes have resulted in several detections of long-lived bright atmospheric features that have also been observed by large telescopes such as Keck II or Hubble. The combination of both types of images allows the study of the long term evolution of major cloud systems in the planet. In 2013 and 2014 two bright features were present on the planet at southern mid latitudes. These may have merged in late 2014, possibly leading to the formation of a single bright feature observed during 2015 at the same latitude. This cloud system was first observed in January 2015 and nearly continuously from July to December 2015 in observations with telescopes in the 2 to 10 meter class and in images from amateur astronomers. These images show the bright spot as a compact feature at 40.1 deg South planetographic latitude well resolved from a nearby bright zonal band that extended from 42 deg South to 20 deg South. Tracking its motion from July to November 2015 suggests a longitudinal oscillation of 16 deg in amplitude with a 90 day period, typical of dark spots on Neptune and similar to the Great Red Spot oscillation in Jupiter. The limited time covered by high-resolution observations only covers one full oscillation and other interpretations of the changing motions could be possible. HST images in September 2015 show the presence of a dark spot at short wavelengths in the southern flank of the bright cloud observed throughout 2015.
  • AG Peg is known as the slowest symbiotic nova, which experienced its nova-like outburst around 1850. After 165 years, during June of 2015, it erupted again showing characteristics of the Z And-type outburst. The primary objective is to determine basic characteristics, the nature and type of the 2015 outburst of AG Peg. We achieved this aim by modelling the spectral energy distribution using low-resolution spectroscopy (330-750 nm), medium-resolution spectroscopy (420-720 nm; R=11000), and $UBVR_{\rm C}I_{\rm C}$ photometry covering the 2015 outburst with a high cadence. Optical observations were complemented with the archival HST and FUSE spectra from the preceding quiescence. During the outburst, the luminosity of the hot component was in the range of 2-11$\times 10^{37}(d/0.8{\rm kpc})^2$ erg/s. To generate the maximum luminosity the white dwarf (WD) had to accrete at $\sim 3\times 10^{-7}$ M$_{\odot}yr^{-1}$, which exceeds the stable-burning limit and thus led to blowing optically thick wind from the WD. We determined its mass-loss rate to a few $\times 10^{-6}$ M$_{\odot}yr^{-1}$. At the high temperature of the ionising source, $1.5-2.3\times 10^5$ K, the wind converted a fraction of the WD's photospheric radiation into the nebular emission that dominated the optical. A one order of magnitude increase of the emission measure, from a few $\times 10^{59}(d/0.8 {\rm kpc})^2$ cm$^{-3}$ during quiescence, to a few $\times 10^{60}(d/0.8\,{\rm kpc})^2$ cm$^{-3}$ during the outburst, caused a 2 mag brightening in the LC, which is classified as the Z And-type of the outburst. The very high nebular emission and the presence of a disk-like HI region encompassing the WD, as indicated by a significant broadening and high flux of the Raman-scattered OVI 6825 \AA\ line during the outburst, is consistent with the ionisation structure of hot components in symbiotic stars during active phases.
  • We determine the temporal evolution of the luminosity L(WD), radius R(WD) and effective temperature Teff of the white dwarf (WD) pseudophotosphere of V339 Del from its discovery to around day 40. Another main objective was studying the ionization structure of the ejecta. These aims were achieved by modelling the optical/near-IR spectral energy distribution (SED) using low-resolution spectroscopy (3500 - 9200 A), UBVRcIc and JHKLM photometry. During the fireball stage (Aug. 14.8 - 19.9, 2013), Teff was in the range of 6000 - 12000 K, R(WD) was expanding non-uniformly in time from around 66 to around 300 (d/3 kpc) R(Sun), and L(WD) was super-Eddington, but not constant. After the fireball stage, a large emission measure of 1.0-2.0E+62 (d/3 kpc)**2 cm**(-3) constrained the lower limit of L(WD) to be well above the super-Eddington value. The evolution of the H-alpha line and mainly the transient emergence of the Raman-scattered O VI 1032 A line suggested a biconical ionization structure of the ejecta with a disk-like H I region persisting around the WD until its total ionization, around day 40. It is evident that the nova was not evolving according to the current theoretical prediction. The unusual non-spherically symmetric ejecta of nova V339 Del and its extreme physical conditions and evolution during and after the fireball stage represent interesting new challenges for the theoretical modelling of the nova phenomenon.