• Among the most spectacular variable stars are the Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs), which can show three types of variability. The LBV phase of evolution is poorly understood, and the driving mechanisms for the variability are not known. The most common type of variability, the S Dor instability, occurs on timescales of tens of years. During an S Dor outburst, the visual magnitude of the star increases, while the bolometric magnitude stays approximately constant. In this work, we investigate pulsation as a possible trigger for the S Dor type outbursts. We calculate the pulsations of envelope models using a nonlinear hydrodynamics code including a time-dependent convection treatment. We initialize the pulsation in the hydrodynamic model based on linear non-adiabatic calculations. Pulsation properties for a full grid of models from 20 to 85 M$_{\odot}$ were calculated, and in this paper we focus on the few models that show either long-period pulsations or outburst-like behaviour, with photospheric radial velocities reaching 70-80 km/s. At the present time, our models cannot follow mass loss, so once the outburst event begins, our simulations are terminated. Our results show that pulsations alone are not able to drive enough surface expansion to eject the outer layers. However, the outbursts and long-period pulsations discussed here produce large variations in effective temperature and luminosity, which are expected to produce large variations in the radiatively driven mass-loss rates.
  • We comment on the potential for continuing asteroseismology of solar-type and red-giant stars in a 2-wheel Kepler Mission. Our main conclusion is that by targeting stars in the ecliptic it should be possible to perform high-quality asteroseismology, as long as favorable scenarios for 2-wheel pointing performance are met. Targeting the ecliptic would potentially facilitate unique science that was not possible in the nominal Mission, notably from the study of clusters that are significantly brighter than those in the Kepler field. Our conclusions are based on predictions of 2-wheel observations made by a space photometry simulator, with information provided by the Kepler Project used as input to describe the degraded pointing scenarios. We find that elevated levels of frequency-dependent noise, consistent with the above scenarios, would have a significant negative impact on our ability to continue asteroseismic studies of solar-like oscillators in the Kepler field. However, the situation may be much more optimistic for observations in the ecliptic, provided that pointing resets of the spacecraft during regular desaturations of the two functioning reaction wheels are accurate at the < 1 arcsec level. This would make it possible to apply a post-hoc analysis that would recover most of the lost photometric precision. Without this post-hoc correction---and the accurate re-pointing it requires---the performance would probably be as poor as in the Kepler-field case. Critical to our conclusions for both fields is the assumed level of pointing noise (in the short-term jitter and the longer-term drift). We suggest that further tests will be needed to clarify our results once more detail and data on the expected pointing performance becomes available, and we offer our assistance in this work.
  • We outline a proposal to use the Kepler spacecraft in two-wheel mode to monitor a handful of young associations and open clusters, for a few weeks each. Judging from the experience of similar projects using ground-based telescopes and the CoRoT spacecraft, this program would transform our understanding of early stellar evolution through the study of pulsations, rotation, activity, the detection and characterisation of eclipsing binaries, and the possible detection of transiting exoplanets. Importantly, Kepler's wide field-of-view would enable key spatially extended, nearby regions to be monitored in their entirety for the first time, and the proposed observations would exploit unique synergies with the GAIA ESO spectroscopic survey and, in the longer term, the GAIA mission itself. We also outline possible strategies for optimising the photometric performance of Kepler in two-wheel mode by modelling pixel sensitivity variations and other systematics.
  • Recent solar photospheric abundance analyses (Asplund et al. 2004, 2005; Lodders 2003) have revised downward the C, N, O, Ne, and Ar abundances by 0.15 to 0.2 dex compared to previous determinations of Grevesse & Sauval (1998). With these revisions, the photospheric Z/X decreases to 0.0165 (0.0177 Lodders), and Z to ~0.0122 (0.0133 Lodders). A number of papers report that solar models evolved with standard opacities and diffusion treatment using these new abundances give poor agreement with helioseismic inferences. Here we explore evolved solar models with varying diffusion treatments to reduce the photospheric abundances while keeping the interior abundances about the same as earlier standard models. While enhanced diffusion improves agreement with some helioseismic constraints compared to a solar model evolved with the new abundances using nominal input physics, the required increases in thermal diffusion rates are unphysically large, and none of the variations tried restores the good agreement attained using the earlier abundances. A combination of modest opacity increases, diffusion enhancements, and abundance increases near the level of the uncertainties, while somewhat contrived, remains the most physically plausible means to restore agreement with helioseismology. The case for enhanced diffusion would be improved if the inferred convection-zone helium abundance could be reduced; we recommend reconsidering this derivation in light of new equations of state with modified abundances and other improvements. We also recommend considering, as a last resort, diluting the convection zone, which contains only 2.5% of the sun's mass, by accretion of material depleted in these more volatile elements C, N, O, Ne, & Ar after the sun arrived on the main sequence.
  • Recent solar abundance analyses (Asplund et al. 2004; Lodders 2003) revise downward the abundances of C, N, O, Ne, and Ar, which reduces the solar photospheric Z/X to 0.017, and Z to ~0.013. Solar models evolved with standard opacities and diffusion treatment using these new abundances give poor agreement with helioseismic inferences for sound speed profile, convection zone helium abundance, and convection zone depth. Here we present helioseismic results for evolved solar models with these reduced photospheric abundances, trying varying diffusion treatments. We compare results for models with no diffusion, enhanced thermal diffusion, and enhanced diffusion of C, N, O, Ne, and Mg only. We find that while each of these models provides some improvements compared to a solar model evolved with the new abundances and standard physics, none restores the good agreement with helioseismology attained using the earlier abundances of, e.g., Grevesse & Sauval (1998). We suggest that opacity increases of about 20% for conditions below the convection zone, or the possibility of accretion of lower-Z material at the surface as the sun arrived at the main sequence, should be investigated to restore agreement. In addition, the new abundance determinations should be re-considered, as, if they are correct, it will be difficult to reconcile solar models with helioseismic results.
  • We present a theoretical analysis of galaxy-galaxy lensing in the context of halo models with CDM motivated dark matter profiles. The model enables us to separate between the central galactic and noncentral group/cluster contributions. We apply the model to the recent SDSS measurements with known redshifts and luminosities of the lenses. This allows one to accurately model the mass distribution of a local galaxy population around and above $L_{\star}$. We find that virial mass of L* galaxy is M*=(5-10)x10^{11}h^{-1}M_{\sun}, depending on the color of the galaxy. This value varies significantly with galaxy morphology with M* for late types being a factor of 10 lower in u', 7 in g' and a factor of 2.5-3 lower in r', i' and z' relative to early types. Fraction of noncentral galaxies in groups and clusters is estimated to be below 10% for late types and around 30% for early types. Using the luminosity dependence of the signal we find that for early types the virial halo mass M scales with luminosity as M \propto L^1.4 in red bands above L*. This shows that the virial mass to light ratio is increasing with luminosity for galaxies above L*, as predicted by theoretical models. The virial mass to light ratio in i' band is 17(45)hM_{\sun}/L_{\sun} at L* for late (early) types. Combining this result with cosmological baryon fraction one finds that 0.7(0.25)h^{-1}\Upsilon_i\Omega_m/12\Omega_b of baryons within the virial radius are converted to stars at L*, where \Upsilon_i is the stellar mass to light ratio in i' band. This indicates that both for early and late type galaxies around L* a significant fraction of all the baryons in the halo is transformed into stars.