• We use new and archival Chandra observations of Cygnus A, totalling $\sim$1.9 Ms, to investigate the distribution and temperature structure of gas lying within the projected extent of the cocoon shock and exhibiting a rib-like structure. We confirm that the X-rays are dominated by thermal emission with an average temperature of around 4 keV, and have discovered an asymmetry in the temperature gradient, with the southwestern part of the gas cooler than the rest by up to 2 keV. Pressure estimates suggest that the gas is a coherent structure of single origin located inside the cocoon, with a mass of roughly $2\times10^{10} M_{\odot}$. We conclude that the gas is debris resulting from disintegration of the cool core of the Cygnus A cluster after the passage of the jet during the early stages of the current epoch of activity. The 4 keV gas now lies on the central inside surface of the hotter cocoon rim. The temperature gradient could result from an offset between the centre of the cluster core and the Cygnus A host galaxy at the switch-on of current radio activity.
  • Only a small fraction of observed Active Galactic Nuclei display large-scale radio emission associated with jets, yet these radio-loud AGN have become increasingly important in models of galaxy evolution. In determining the dynamics and energetics of the radio sources over cosmic time, a key question concerns what happens when their jets switch off. The resulting `remnant' radio-loud AGN have been surprisingly evasive in past radio surveys, and therefore statistical information on the population of radio-loud AGN in their dying phase is limited. In this paper, with the recent developments of LOFAR and the VLA, we are able to provide a systematically selected sample of remnant radio-loud AGN in the Herschel-ATLAS field. Using a simple core-detection method, we constrain the upper limit on the fraction of remnants in our radio-loud AGN sample to 9 per cent, implying that the extended lobe emission fades rapidly once the core/jets turn off. We also find that our remnant sample has a wide range of spectral indices ($-1.5\leqslant \alpha^{1400}_{150}\leqslant -0.5$), confirming that the lobes of some remnants may possess flat spectra at low frequencies just as active sources do. We suggest that, even with the unprecedented sensitivity of LOFAR, our sample may still only contain the youngest of the remnant population.
  • We report L-band VLA observations of 1RXS J0603.3+4214, a cluster that hosts a bright radio relic, known as the Toothbrush, and an elongated giant radio halo. These new observations allow us to study the surface brightness distribution down to one arcsec resolution with very high sensitivity. Our images provide an unprecedented detailed view of the Toothbrush, revealing enigmatic filamentary structures. To study the spectral index distribution, we complement our analysis with published LOFAR and GMRT observations. The bright `brush' of the Toothbrush shows a prominent narrow ridge to its north with a sharp outer edge. The spectral index at the ridge is in the range $-0.70\leq\alpha\leq-0.80$. We suggest that the ridge is caused by projection along the line of sight. With a simple toy model for the smallest region of the ridge, we conclude that the magnetic field is below $5\,\rm\mu G$ and varies significantly across the shock front. Our model indicates that the actual Mach number is higher than that obtained from the injection index and agrees well with the one derived from the overall spectrum, namely ${\cal M}=3.78^{+0.3}_{-0.2}$. The radio halo shows an average spectral index of $\alpha=-1.16\pm0.05$ and a slight gradient from north to south. The southernmost part of the halo is steeper and possibly related to a shock front. Excluding the southernmost part, the halo morphology agrees very well with the X-ray morphology. A power-law correlation is found between the radio and X-ray surface brightness
  • We present a deep, low-frequency radio continuum study of the nearby Fanaroff--Riley class I (FR I) radio galaxy 3C 31 using a combination of LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR; 30--85 and 115--178 MHz), Very Large Array (VLA; 290--420 MHz), Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT; 609 MHz) and Giant Metre Radio Telescope (GMRT; 615 MHz) observations. Our new LOFAR 145-MHz map shows that 3C 31 has a largest physical size of $1.1$ Mpc in projection, which means 3C 31 now falls in the class of giant radio galaxies. We model the radio continuum intensities with advective cosmic-ray transport, evolving the cosmic-ray electron population and magnetic field strength in the tails as functions of distance to the nucleus. We find that if there is no in-situ particle acceleration in the tails, then decelerating flows are required that depend on radius $r$ as $v\propto r^{\beta}$ ($\beta\approx -1$). This then compensates for the strong adiabatic losses due to the lateral expansion of the tails. We are able to find self-consistent solutions in agreement with the entrainment model of Croston & Hardcastle, where the magnetic field provides $\approx$$1/3$ of the pressure needed for equilibrium with the surrounding intra-cluster medium (ICM). We obtain an advective time-scale of $\approx$$190$ Myr, which, if equated to the source age, would require an average expansion Mach number ${\cal M} \approx 5$ over the source lifetime. Dynamical arguments suggest that instead, either the outer tail material does not represent the oldest jet plasma or else the particle ages are underestimated due to the effects of particle acceleration on large scales.
  • We present a new analysis of the widely used relation between cavity power and radio luminosity in clusters of galaxies with evidence for strong AGN feedback. We study the correlation at low radio frequencies using two new surveys - the First Alternative Data Release of the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS ADR1) at 148 MHz and LOFAR's first all-sky survey, the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) at 140 MHz. We find a scaling relation $P_{\rm cav} \propto L_{148}^{\beta}$, with a logarithmic slope of $\beta = 0.51 \pm 0.14$, which is in good agreement with previous results based on data at 327 MHz. The large scatter present in this correlation confirms the conclusion reached at higher frequencies that the total radio luminosity at a single frequency is a poor predictor of the total jet power. We show that including measurements at 148 MHz alone is insufficient to reliably compute the bolometric radio luminosity and reduce the scatter in the correlation. For a subset of four well-resolved sources, we examine the detected extended structures at low frequencies and compare with the morphology known from higher frequency images and Chandra X-ray maps. In Perseus we discuss details in the structures of the radio mini-halo, while in the 2A 0335+096 cluster we observe new diffuse emission associated with multiple X-ray cavities and likely originating from past activity. For A2199 and MS 0735.6+7421, we confirm that the observed low-frequency radio lobes are confined to the extents known from higher frequencies. This new low-frequency analysis highlights the fact that existing cavity power to radio luminosity relations are based on a relatively narrow range of AGN outburst ages. We discuss how the correlation could be extended using low frequency data from the LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey (LoTSS) in combination with future, complementary deeper X-ray observations.
  • The 2Jy sample is a survey of radio galaxies with flux densities above 2 Jy at 2.7 GHz. As part of our ongoing work on the southern subset of 2Jy sources, in paper I of this series we analysed the X-ray cores of the complete 2Jy sample with redshifts 0.05<z<0.7. For this work we focus on the X-ray emission associated with the extended structures (jets, lobes, and environments) of the complete subset of 2Jy sources with 0.05<z<0.2, that we have observed with Chandra. We find that hotspots and jet knots are ubiquitous in FRII sources, which also inhabit systematically poorer environments than the FRI sources in our sample. Spectral fits of the hotspots with good X-ray statistics invariably show properties consistent with synchrotron emission, and we show that inverse-Compton mechanisms under-predict the X-ray emission we observe by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Inverse-Compton emission is detected from many of the lobes in our sample, and we find that the lobes of the FRII sources show magnetic fields lower by up to an order of magnitude than expected from equipartition extrapolations. This is consistent with previous results, which show that most FRII sources have electron energy densities higher than minimum energy requirements.
  • We report on the discovery in the LOFAR Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) of a giant radio galaxy (GRG) with a projected size of $2.56 \pm 0.07$ Mpc projected on the sky. It is associated with the galaxy triplet UGC 9555, within which one is identified as a broad-line galaxy in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) at a redshift of $0.05453 \pm 1 \times 10^{-5} $, and with a velocity dispersion of $215.86 \pm 6.34$ km/s. From archival radio observations we see that this galaxy hosts a compact flat-spectrum radio source, and we conclude that it is the active galactic nucleus (AGN) responsible for generating the radio lobes. The radio luminosity distribution of the jets, and the broad-line classification of the host AGN, indicate this GRG is orientated well out of the plane of the sky, making its physical size one of the largest known for any GRG. Analysis of the infrared data suggests that the host is a lenticular type galaxy with a large stellar mass ($\log~\mathrm{M}/\mathrm{M}_\odot = 11.56 \pm 0.12$), and a moderate star formation rate ($1.2 \pm 0.3~\mathrm{M}_\odot/\mathrm{year}$). Spatially smoothing the SDSS images shows the system around UGC 9555 to be significantly disturbed, with a prominent extension to the south-east. Overall, the evidence suggests this host galaxy has undergone one or more recent moderate merger events and is also experiencing tidal interactions with surrounding galaxies, which have caused the star formation and provided the supply of gas to trigger and fuel the Mpc-scale radio lobes.
  • We have observed the steep spectrum radio source B2 0924+30 using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) telescope. Hosted by a z=0.026 elliptical galaxy, it has a relatively large angular size of 12' (corresponding to 360 kpc projected linear size) and a morphology reminiscent of a remnant Fanaroff-Riley type II (FRII) radio galaxy. We combine LOFAR and archival images to study the spectral properties at a spatial resolution of 1'. We derive low frequency spectral index maps and use synchrotron ageing models to infer ages for different regions of the source. Using radiative ageing model fitting we show that the AGN activity ceased around 50 Myr ago. We note that the outer regions of the lobes are younger than the inner regions which is interpreted as a sign that those regions are remnant hotspots. We demonstrate the usefulness of maps of AGN radio remnants taken at low frequencies and suggest caution over the interpretation of spectral ages derived from integrated flux density measurements versus age mapping. The spectral index properties as well as the derived ages of B2 0924+30 are consistent with it being an FRII AGN radio remnant. LOFAR data are proving to be instrumental in extending our studies to the lowest radio frequencies and enabling analysis of the oldest source regions.
  • We present deep LOFAR observations between 120-181 MHz of the "Toothbrush" (RX J0603.3+4214), a cluster that contains one of the brightest radio relic sources known. Our LOFAR observations exploit a new and novel calibration scheme to probe 10 times deeper than any previous study in this relatively unexplored part of the spectrum. The LOFAR observations, when combined with VLA, GMRT, and Chandra X-ray data, provide new information about the nature of cluster merger shocks and their role in re-accelerating relativistic particles. We derive a spectral index of $\alpha = -0.8 \pm 0.1$ at the northern edge of the main radio relic, steepening towards the south to $\alpha \approx - 2$. The spectral index of the radio halo is remarkably uniform ($\alpha = -1.16$, with an intrinsic scatter of $\leq 0.04$). The observed radio relic spectral index gives a Mach number of $\mathcal{M} = 2.8^{+0.5}_{-0.3}$, assuming diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). However, the gas density jump at the northern edge of the large radio relic implies a much weaker shock ($\mathcal{M} \approx 1.2$, with an upper limit of $\mathcal{M} \approx 1.5$). The discrepancy between the Mach numbers calculated from the radio and X-rays can be explained if either (i) the relic traces a complex shock surface along the line of sight, or (ii) if the radio relic emission is produced by a re-accelerated population of fossil particles from a radio galaxy. Our results highlight the need for additional theoretical work and numerical simulations of particle acceleration and re-acceleration at cluster merger shocks.
  • LOFAR, the Low-Frequency Array, is a powerful new radio telescope operating between 10 and 240 MHz. LOFAR allows detailed sensitive high-resolution studies of the low-frequency radio sky. At the same time LOFAR also provides excellent short baseline coverage to map diffuse extended emission. However, producing high-quality deep images is challenging due to the presence of direction dependent calibration errors, caused by imperfect knowledge of the station beam shapes and the ionosphere. Furthermore, the large data volume and presence of station clock errors present additional difficulties. In this paper we present a new calibration scheme, which we name facet calibration, to obtain deep high-resolution LOFAR High Band Antenna images using the Dutch part of the array. This scheme solves and corrects the direction dependent errors in a number of facets that cover the observed field of view. Facet calibration provides close to thermal noise limited images for a typical 8 hr observing run at $\sim$ 5arcsec resolution, meeting the specifications of the LOFAR Tier-1 northern survey.
  • We report on deep Chandra observations of the nearby broad-line radio galaxy Pictor A, which we combine with new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations. The new X-ray data have a factor 4 more exposure than observations previously presented and span a 15-year time baseline, allowing a detailed study of the spatial, temporal and spectral properties of the AGN, jet, hotspot and lobes. We present evidence for further time variation of the jet, though the flare that we reported in previous work remains the most significantly detected time-varying feature. We also confirm previous tentative evidence for a faint counterjet. Based on the radio through X-ray spectrum of the jet and its detailed spatial structure, and on the properties of the counterjet, we argue that inverse-Compton models can be conclusively rejected, and propose that the X-ray emission from the jet is synchrotron emission from particles accelerated in the boundary layer of a relativistic jet. For the first time, we find evidence that the bright western hotspot is also time-varying in X-rays, and we connect this to the small-scale structure in the hotspot seen in high-resolution radio observations. The new data allow us to confirm that the spectrum of the lobes is in good agreement with the predictions of an inverse-Compton model and we show that the data favour models in which the filaments seen in the radio images are predominantly the result of spatial variation of magnetic fields in the presence of a relatively uniform electron distribution.
  • CIZA J2242.8+5301, a merging galaxy cluster at z=0.19, hosts a double-relic system and a faint radio halo. Radio observations at frequencies ranging from a few MHz to several GHz have shown that the radio spectral index at the outer edge of the N relic corresponds to a shock of Mach number 4.6+/-1.1, under the assumptions of diffusive shock acceleration of thermal particles in the test particle regime. Here, we present results from new Chandra observations of the cluster. The Chandra surface brightness profile across the N relic only hints to a surface brightness discontinuity (<2-sigma detection). Nevertheless, our reanalysis of archival Suzaku data indicates a temperature discontinuity across the relic that is consistent with a Mach number of 2.5+/-0.5, in agreement with previously published results. This confirms that the Mach number at the shock traced by the N relic is much weaker than predicted from the radio. Puzzlingly, in the Chandra data we also identify additional inner small density discontinuities both on and off the merger axis. Temperature measurements on both sides of the discontinuities do not allow us to undoubtedly determine their nature, although a shock front interpretation seems more likely. We speculate that if the inner density discontinuities are indeed shock fronts, then they are the consequence of violent relaxation of the dark matter cores of the clusters involved in the merger.
  • We present the results of high resolution VLBI observations at 1.6 and 4.9 GHz of the radio-loud Seyfert galaxy, Mrk 6. These observations are able to detect a compact radio core in this galaxy for the first time. The core has an inverted spectral index ($\alpha^{1.6}_{4.9}$=+1.0$\pm$0.2) and a brightness temperature of $1\times10^8$ K. Three distinct radio components which resemble jet elements and/or hot spots, are also detected. The position angles of these elongated jet elements point, not only to a curved jet in Mrk 6, but also towards a connection between the AGN and the kpc-scale radio lobes/bubbles in this galaxy. Firmer constraints on the star formation rate provided by new Herschel observations (SFR $<0.8$ M$_\sun$ yr$^{-1}$) make the starburst-wind powered bubble scenario implausible. From plasma speeds obtained via prior Chandra X-ray observations, and ram pressure balance arguments for the ISM and radio bubbles, the north-south bubbles are expected to take $7.5\times10^6$ yr to form, and the east-west bubbles $1.4\times10^6$ yr. We suggest that the jet axis has changed at least once in Mrk 6 within the last $\approx10^7$ yr. A comparison of the nuclear radio-loudness of Mrk 6 and a small sample of Seyfert galaxies with a subset of low-luminosity FRI radio galaxies reveals a continuum in radio properties.
  • We carry out a systematic study of the X-ray emission from the active nuclei of the 0.02<z<0.7 2Jy sample, using Chandra and XMM-Newton observations. We combine our results with those from mid-IR, optical emission line and radio observations, and add them to those of the 3CRR sources. We show that the low-excitation objects in our samples \redit{show signs} of radiatively inefficient accretion. We study the effect of the jet-related emission on the various luminosities, confirming that it is the main source of soft X-ray emission for our sources. We also find strong correlations between the accretion-related luminosities, and identify several sources whose optical classification is incompatible with their accretion properties. We derive the bolometric and jet kinetic luminosities for the samples and find a difference in the total Eddington rate between the low and high-excitation populations, with the former peaking at ~1 per cent and the latter at ~20 per cent Eddington. Our results are consistent with a simple Eddington switch when the effects of environment on radio luminosity and black hole mass calculations are considered. The apparent independence of jet kinetic power and radiative luminosity in the high-excitation population in our plots supports a model in which jet production and radiatively efficient accretion are not strongly correlated in high-excitation objects, though they have a common underlying mechanism.
  • Major astrophysical questions related to the formation and evolution of structures, and more specifically of galaxy groups and clusters, will still be open in the coming decade and beyond: what is the interplay of galaxy, supermassive black hole, and intergalactic gas evolution in the most massive objects in the Universe - galaxy groups and clusters? What are the processes driving the evolution of chemical enrichment of the hot diffuse gas in large-scale structures? How and when did the first galaxy groups in the Universe, massive enough to bind more than 10^7 K gas, form? Focussing on the period when groups and clusters assembled (0.5<z<2.5), we show that, due to the continuum and line emission of this hot intergalactic gas at X-ray wavelengths, Athena+, combining high sensitivity with excellent spectral and spatial resolution, will deliver breakthrough observations in view of the aforementioned issues. Indeed, the physical and chemical properties of the hot intra-cluster gas, and their evolution across time, are a key to understand the co-evolution of galaxy and supermassive black hole within their environments.
  • We present here the first results from the Chandra ERA (Environments of Radio-loud AGN) Large Project, characterizing the cluster environments of a sample of 26 radio-loud AGN at z ~ 0.5 that covers three decades of radio luminosity. This is the first systematic X-ray environmental study at a single epoch, and has allowed us to examine the relationship between radio luminosity and cluster environment without the problems of Malmquist bias. We have found a weak correlation between radio luminosity and host cluster X-ray luminosity, as well as tentative evidence that this correlation is driven by the subpopulation of low-excitation radio galaxies, with high-excitation radio galaxies showing no significant correlation. The considerable scatter in the environments may be indicative of complex relationships not currently included in feedback models.
  • The cluster 1RXS J0603.3+4214 is a merging galaxy cluster that hosts three radio relics and a giant radio halo. The northern relic, the Toothbrush, is 1.9-Mpc long and has an unusual linear morphology. According to simple diffusive shock acceleration theory, its radio spectral index indicates a Mach number of 3.3-4.6. Here, we present results from a deep XMM-Newton observation of the cluster. We observe two distinct cluster cores that have survived the merger. The presence of three shocks at or near the locations of the radio relics is confirmed by density and temperature discontinuities. However, the observation poses several puzzles that challenge our understanding of radio relics: (i) at the Toothbrush, the shock Mach number is not larger than 2, in apparent conflict with the shock strength predicted from the radio spectrum; (ii) at the Toothbrush, the shock front is, in part, spatially offset from the radio emission; (iii) at the eastern relic, we detect a temperature jump corresponding to a Mach number of approximately 2.5, but there is no associated surface brightness discontinuity. We discuss possible explanations for these findings.
  • Multiwavelength studies of radio relics at merger shocks set powerful constraints on the relics origin and formation mechanism. However, for X-ray observations, a main difficulty is represented by the low X-ray surface brightness far out in the cluster outskirts, where relics are typically found. Here, we present XMM-Newton results from a 130-ks observation of CIZA J2242.8+5301, a cluster at z=0.19 that hosts a double radio relic. We focus on the well-defined northern relic. There is a difference of ~55% between the temperature we measure behind the relic, and the temperature measured with Suzaku. We analyse the reasons for this large discrepancy, and discuss the possibility of reliably measuring the temperature beyond the northern relic.
  • We explore the magneto-ionic environment of the isolated radio galaxy B2 0755+37 using detailed imaging of the distributions of Faraday rotation and depolarization over the radio source from Very Large Array observations at 1385,1465 and 4860 MHz and new X-ray data from XMM-Newton. The Rotation Measure (RM) distribution is complex, with evidence for anisotropic fluctuations in two regions. The approaching lobe shows low and uniform RM in an unusual `stripe' along an extension of the jet axis and a linear gradient transverse to this axis over its Northern half. The leading edge of the receding lobe shows arc-like RM structures with sign reversals. Elsewhere, the RM structures are reasonably isotropic. The RM power spectra are well described by cut-off power laws with slopes ranging from 2.1 to 3.2 in different sub-regions. The corresponding magnetic-field autocorrelation lengths, where well-determined, range from 0.25 to 1.4 kpc. It is likely that the fluctuations are mostly produced by compressed gas and field around the leading edges of the lobes. We identify areas of high depolarization around the jets and inner lobes. These could be produced by dense gas immediately surrounding the radio emission containing a magnetic field which is tangled on small scales. We also identify four ways in which the well known depolarization (Faraday depth) asymmetry between jetted and counter-jetted lobes of extended radio sources can be modified by interactions with the surrounding medium.
  • We analyzed new 237 MHz and 614 MHz GMRT data of the most X-ray luminous galaxy cluster, RX J1347-1145. Our radio results are compared with the MUSTANG 90 GHz Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect map and with re-processed Chandra and XMM-Newton archival data of this cluster. We point out for the first time in an unambiguous way the correspondence between a radio excess in a diffuse intra-cluster radio source and a hot region detected through both Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect and X-ray observations. Our result indicates that electron re-acceleration in the excess emission of the radio mini-halo at the center of RX J1347-1145 is most likely related to a shock front propagating into the intra-cluster medium.
  • We present a detailed analysis of a new XMM-Newton observation of the FRII radio galaxy 3C452 and its environment. We detect X-ray emission from the hot intragroup medium and measure its temperature as well as obtaining the surface brightness and pressure profiles. We provide evidence that 3C452 is currently heating its environment, measuring a temperature of $1.18\pm0.11$ keV for the immediate environment of the radio source compared to $0.86^{+0.13}_{-0.05}$ keV for the outer environment. We also present evidence that the outer regions of the lobes are overpressured (internal pressure of $2.6\times10^{-13}$ Pa and external pressure of $1.11\pm{0.11}\times10^{-13}$ Pa at the edge of the lobes) and therefore are driving a shock at the lobe edges (with a temperature which we constrain to be $1.7^{+0.9}_{-0.5}$ keV), while the inner regions of the lobes are underpressured and contracting. Taking into account the very large amount of energy stored in the lobes, we show that this relatively low-powered FRII radio galaxy will have an extremely significant impact on its group environment.
  • We construct a simple theoretical model to investigate how entrainment gradually erodes high-speed FR II jets. This process is described by embedding a mixing-layer model developed originally to describe FR I objects in a self-similar model for the lobe structure of classical FR II sources. Following the classical FR II models, we assume that the lobe is dominated by the particles injected from the central jet. The entrainment produces a boundary shear layer which acts at the interface between the dense central jet and the less denser surrounding lobe, and the associated erosion of the jet places interesting limits on the maximum size of FR II sources. The model shows that this limit depends mainly on the initial bulk velocity of the relativistic jet triggered. The bulk velocities of FR IIs suggested by our model are in good agreement with that obtained from direct pc-scale observations on ordinary radio galaxies and quasars. Finally, we discuss how FR IIs may evolve into FR Is upon reaching their maximum, entrainment-limited sizes.
  • The widespread detection of synchrotron X-ray emission from the jets of low-power, nearby radio galaxies implies the presence of electrons at and above TeV energies. In this paper we explore the possibility that the TeV gamma-rays detected from the radio galaxies Cen A and M87, which both have bright, well-studied X-ray jets, are produced at least in part by inverse-Compton scattering of various photon fields by the high-energy electrons responsible for the synchrotron X-rays on kiloparsec scales. We describe a new numerical code that we have developed to carry out inverse-Compton calculations taking account of all the relevant physics and using detailed models of the jets and the photon fields in which they are embedded, and show that existing constraints on the very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray fluxes of these two objects already place significant constraints on the magnetic field strengths in the jet in Cen A. Finally, we discuss the prospects for constraints on radio galaxy jet physics that may be obtained from observations with the Cerenkov Telescope Array (CTA).
  • We use XMM-Newton observations of the galaxy cluster MaxBCG J217.95869+13.53470 to analyze its physical properties and dynamical state. MaxBCG J217.95869+13.53470 is found at a redshift of 0.16, has a mass of ~1x10^14 Msun, and a luminosity of 7.9x10^43 erg/s. The temperature map shows the presence of hot regions towards the north and west of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). From the entropy distribution, regions of high entropy match the location of the hot regions; more high entropy regions are found to the west, and ~165 kpc to the southwest of the central AGN. A second X-ray bright galaxy is visible ~90 kpc to the northeast of the BCG, at a redshift of 0.162. This galaxy is likely to be the BCG of a smaller, infalling galaxy cluster. The mass of the smaller cluster is ~10 percent the mass of MaxBCG J217.95869+13.53470, yielding an impact parameter of ~30-100 kpc. We compare the results of our X-ray observations with GMRT observations of the radio source VLSS J1431.8+1331, located at the center of the cluster. Two sources are visible in the radio: a central elongated source that bends at its northern and southern ends, and a southwestern source that coincides with a region of high entropy. The radio sources are connected by a bridge of faint radio emission. We speculate that the southwestern radio source is a radio relic produced by compression of old radio plasma by a merger shock.
  • We examine two members of the NGC 4065 group of galaxies: a bent-double (a.k.a. wide angle tail) radio source and an HI deficient spiral galaxy. Models of the X-ray emitting intragroup gas and the bent-double radio source, NGC 4061, are used to probe the density of intergalactic gas in this group. HI observations reveal an asymmetric, truncated distribution of neutral gas in spiral galaxy, UGC 07049, and the accompanying radio continuum emission reveals strong star formation. We examine the effectiveness of ram pressure stripping as a gas removal mechanism and find that it alone cannot account for the HI deficiency that is observed in UGC 07049 unless this galaxy has passed through the core of the group with a velocity of ~800 km/s. A combination of tidal and ram pressure stripping are necessary to produce the HI deficiency and asymmetry in this galaxy.