• Stellar activity is ubiquitously encountered in M dwarfs and often characterised by the H$\alpha$ line. In the most active M dwarfs, H$\alpha$ is found in emission, sometimes with a complex line profile. Previous studies have reported extended wings and asymmetries in the H$\alpha$ line during flares. We used a total of 473 high-resolution spectra of 28 active M dwarfs obtained by the CARMENES (Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exo-earths with Near-infrared and optical Echelle Spectrographs) spectrograph to study the occurrence of broadened and asymmetric H$\alpha$ line profiles and their association with flares, and examine possible physical explanations. We detected a total of 41 flares and 67 broad, potentially asymmetric, wings in H$\alpha$. The broadened H$\alpha$ lines display a variety of profiles with symmetric cases and both red and blue asymmetries. Although some of these line profiles are found during flares, the majority are at least not obviously associated with flaring. We propose a mechanism similar to coronal rain or chromospheric downward condensations as a cause for the observed red asymmetries; the symmetric cases may also be caused by Stark broadening. We suggest that blue asymmetries are associated with rising material, and our results are consistent with a prevalence of blue asymmetries during the flare onset. Besides the H$\alpha$ asymmetries, we find some cases of additional line asymmetries in \ion{He}{i} D$_{3}$, \ion{Na}{i}~D lines, and the \ion{He}{i} line at 10830\,\AA\, taken all simultaneously thanks to the large wavelength coverage of CARMENES. Our study shows that asymmetric H$\alpha$ lines are a rather common phenomenon in M~dwarfs and need to be studied in more detail to obtain a better understanding of the atmospheric dynamics in these objects.
  • HD 189733 is an exoplanetary system consisting of a transiting hot Jupiter and an active K2V-type main sequence star. We aim to use VLT/UVES high resolution echelle spectra to study a stellar flare. We have performed simultaneous analyses of the temporal evolution in several chromospheric stellar lines, namely, the Ca II H and K lines, Halpha, Hbeta, Hgamma, Hdelta, Hepsilon, the Ca II infrared triplet line, and He I D3. Observations were carried out with a time resolution of approximately 1 min for a duration of four hours, including a complete planetary transit. We determine the energy released during the flare in all studied chromospheric lines combined to be about 8.7e31 erg, which puts this event at the upper end of flare energies observed on the Sun. Our analysis does not reveal any significant delay of the flare peak observed in the Balmer and Ca II H and K lines, although we find a clear difference in the temporal evolution of these lines. The He I D3 shows additional absorption possibly related to the flare event. Based on the flux released in Ca II H and K lines during the flare, we estimate the soft X-ray flux emission to be 7e30 erg. The observed flare can be ranked as a moderate flare on a K-type star and confirms a rather high activity level of HD 189733 host star. The cores of the studied chromospheric lines demonstrate the same behavior and let us study the flare evolution. We demonstrate that the activity of an exoplanet host star can play an important role in the detection of exoplanet atmospheres, since these are frequently discovered as an additional absorption in the line cores. A possible star-planet interaction responsible for a flare occurrence during a transit can neither be confirmed nor ruled out.
  • Low-mass ultrafast rotators show the typical signatures of magnetic activity and are known to produce flares, probably as a result of magnetic reconnection. As a consequence, the coronae of these stars exhibit very large X-ray luminosities and high plasma temperatures, as well as a pronounced inverse FIP effect. To probe the relationship between the coronal properties with a spectral type of ultra-fast rotators with rotation period P < 1d, we analyse the K3 rapid-rotator LO Peg observed with XMM-Newton and compare it with other low-mass rapid rotators of spectral types G9-M1. We investigate the temporal evolution of coronal properties like the temperatures, emission measures, abundances, densities and the morphology of the involved coronal structures. We find two distinguishable levels of activity in the XMM-Newton observation of LO~Peg, which shows significant X-ray variability both in phase and amplitude, implying the presence of an evolving active region on the surface. The X-ray flux varies by 28%, possibly due to rotational modulation. During our observation, a large X-ray flare with a peak X-ray luminosity of 2E30 erg/s and an energy of 7.3E33 erg was observed. At the flare onset we obtain clear signatures for the occurrence of the Neupert effect. The flare plasma also shows an enhancement of iron by a factor of 2 during the rise and peak phase of the flare. Our modeling analysis suggests that the scale size of the flaring X-ray plasma is smaller than 0.5 R_star. Further, the flare loop length appears to be smaller than the pressure scale height of the flaring plasma. Our studies show that the X-ray properties of the LO~Peg are very similar to those of other low-mass ultrafast rotators, i.e., the X-ray luminosity is very close to saturation, its coronal abundances follow a trend of increasing abundance with increasing first ionisation potential, the so-called inverse FIP effect.
  • We present results of our dense spectroscopic monitoring of Nova V5668 Sgr. Starting on March 19 in 2015, only a few days after discovery, we have obtained a series of spectra with the TIGRE telescope and its HEROS echelle spectrograph which offers a resolution of R = 20,000 and covers the optical wavelength range from 3800 to 8800 {\AA}. We performed a line identification of the discernible features for four spectra which are representative for the respective phases in the light curve evolution of that nova. By simultaneously analysing the variations in the visual light curve and the corresponding spectra of Nova V5668 Sgr, we found that during the declining phases of the nova the absorption features in all hydrogen and many other lines had shifted to higher expansion velocities of -2000 km s^-1. Conversely, during the rise towards the following maximum, these observed absorption features had returned to lower expansion velocities.We found that the absorption features of some Fe II lines displayed the same behaviour, but in addition disappeared for a few days during some declining phases. Features of several N I lines also disappeared while new N II lines appeared in emission for a few days during some of the declining phases of the light curve of Nova V5668 Sgr. The shape of the emission features is changing during the evolution and shows a clear double peak structure after the deep minimum.
  • We report the detection of the secondary eclipse of HAT-P-11 b, a Neptune-sized planet orbiting an active K4 dwarf. Using all available short-cadence data of the Kepler mission, we derive refined planetary ephemeris increasing their precision by more than an order of magnitude. Our simultaneous primary and secondary transit modeling results in improved transit and orbital parameters. In particular, the precise timing of the secondary eclipse allows to pin down the orbital eccentricity to $0.26459_{-0.00048}^{+0.00069}$. The secondary eclipse depth of $6.09_{-1.11}^{+1.12}$ ppm corresponds to a $5.5\sigma$ detection and results in a geometric albedo of $0.39\pm0.07$ for HAT-P-11 b, close to Neptune's value, which may indicate further resemblances between these two bodies. Due to the substantial orbital eccentricity, the planetary equilibrium temperature is expected to change significantly with orbital position and ought to vary between $630^\circ$ K and $950^\circ$ K, depending on the details of heat redistribution in the atmosphere of HAT-P-11 b.
  • Earth's atmosphere imprints a large number of telluric absorption and emission lines on astronomical spectra, especially in the near infrared, that need to be removed before analysing the affected wavelength regions. These lines are typically removed by comparison to A- or B-type stars used as telluric standards that themselves have strong hydrogen lines, which complicates the removal of telluric lines. We have developed a method to circumvent that problem. For our IDL software package tellrem we used a recent approach to model telluric absorption features with the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM). The broad wavelength coverage of the X-Shooter at VLT allows us to expand their technique by determining the abundances of the most important telluric molecules H2O, O2, CO2, and CH4 from sufficiently isolated line groups. For individual observations we construct a telluric absorption model for most of the spectral range that is used to remove the telluric absorption from the object spectrum. We remove telluric absorption from both continuum regions and emission lines without systematic residuals for most of the processable spectral range; however, our method increases the statistical errors. The errors of the corrected spectrum typically increase by 10% for S/N~10 and by a factor of two for high-quality data (S/N~100), i.e. the method is accurate on the percent level. Modelling telluric absorption can be an alternative to the observation of standard stars for removing telluric contamination.
  • Absorption of high-energy radiation in planetary thermospheres is believed to lead to the formation of planetary winds. The resulting mass-loss rates can affect the evolution, particularly of small gas planets. We present 1D, spherically symmetric hydrodynamic simulations of the escaping atmospheres of 18 hot gas planets in the solar neighborhood. Our sample only includes strongly irradiated planets, whose expanded atmospheres may be detectable via transit spectroscopy. The simulations were performed with the PLUTO-CLOUDY interface, which couples a detailed photoionization and plasma simulation code with a general MHD code. We study the thermospheric escape and derive improved estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our simulations reproduce the temperature-pressure profile measured via sodium D absorption in HD 189733 b, but show unexplained differences in the case of HD 209458 b. In contrast to general assumptions, we find that the gravitationally more tightly bound thermospheres of massive and compact planets, such as HAT-P-2 b are hydrodynamically stable. Compact planets dispose of the radiative energy input through hydrogen Ly$\alpha$ and free-free emission. Radiative cooling is also important in HD 189733 b, but it decreases toward smaller planets like GJ 436 b. The simulations show that the strong and cool winds of smaller planets mainly cause strong Ly$\alpha$ absorption but little emission. Compact and massive planets with hot, stable thermospheres cause small absorption signals but are strong Ly$\alpha$ emitters, possibly detectable with the current instrumentation. The absorption and emission signals provide a possible distinction between these two classes of thermospheres in hot gas planets. According to our results, WASP-80 and GJ 3470 are currently the most promising targets for observational follow-up aimed at detecting atmospheric Ly$\alpha$ absorption signals.
  • Gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience photoevaporative mass loss. The energy-limited escape concept is generally used to derive estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our photoionization hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets show that the energy-limited escape concept is valid only for planets with a gravitational potential lower than $\log_\mathrm{10}\left( -\Phi_{\mathrm{G}}\right) < 13.11~$erg$\,$g$^{-1}$ because in these planets the radiative energy input is efficiently used to drive the planetary wind. Massive and compact planets with $\log_\mathrm{10}\left( -\Phi_{\mathrm{G}}\right) \gtrsim 13.6~$erg$\,$g$^{-1}$ exhibit more tightly bound atmospheres in which the complete radiative energy input is re-emitted through hydrogen Ly$\alpha$ and free-free emission. These planets therefore host hydrodynamically stable thermospheres. Between these two extremes the strength of the planetary winds rapidly declines as a result of a decreasing heating efficiency. Small planets undergo enhanced evaporation because they host expanded atmospheres that expose a larger surface to the stellar irradiation. We present scaling laws for the heating efficiency and the expansion radius that depend on the gravitational potential and irradiation level of the planet. The resulting revised energy-limited escape concept can be used to derive estimates for the mass-loss rates of super-Earth-sized planets as well as massive hot Jupiters with hydrogen-dominated atmospheres.
  • The binary system RW Aur consists of two classical T~Tauri stars (CTTSs). The primary recently underwent its second observed major dimming event ($\Delta V\,\sim2\,$mag). We present new, resolved Chandra X-ray and UKIRT near-IR (NIR) data as well as unresolved optical photometry obtained in the dim state to study the gas and dust content of the absorber causing the dimming. The X-ray data show that the absorbing column density increased from $N_H<0.1\times10^{22}\,$cm$^{-2}$ during the bright state to $\approx2\times10^{22}\,$cm$^{-2}$ in the dim state. The brightness ratio between dim and bright state at optical to NIR wavelengths shows only a moderate wavelength dependence and the NIR color-color diagram suggests no substantial reddening. Taken together, this indicates gray absorption by large grains ($\gtrsim1\,\mu$m) with a dust mass column density of $\gtrsim2\times10^{-4}\,$g$\,$cm$^{-2}$. Comparison with $N_H$ shows that an absorber responsible for the optical/NIR dimming and the X-ray absorption is compatible with the ISM's gas-to-dust ratio, i.e., that grains grow in the disk surface layers without largely altering the gas-to-dust ratio. Lastly, we discuss a scenario in which a common mechanism can explain the long-lasting dimming in RW Aur and recently in AA Tau.
  • AA Tau is a well-studied, nearby classical T Tauri star, which is viewed almost edge-on. A warp in its inner disk periodically eclipses the central star, causing a clear modulation of its optical light curve. The system underwent a major dimming event beginning in 2011 caused by an extra absorber, which is most likely associated with additional disk material in the line of sight toward the central source. We present new XMM-Newton X-ray, Hubble Space Telescope FUV, and ground based optical and near-infrared data of the system obtained in 2013 during the long-lasting dim phase. The line width decrease of the fluorescent H$_2$ disk emission shows that the extra absorber is located at $r>1\,$au. Comparison of X-ray absorption ($N_H$) with dust extinction ($A_V$), as derived from measurements obtained one inner disk orbit (eight days) after the X-ray measurement, indicates that the gas-to-dust ratio as probed by the $N_H$ to $A_V$ ratio of the extra absorber is compatible with the ISM ratio. Combining both results suggests that the extra absorber, i.e., material at $r>1\,$au, has no significant gas excess in contrast to the elevated gas-to-dust ratio previously derived for material in the inner region ($\lesssim0.1\,$au).
  • We present a time series of high resolution spectra of the Type Ia supernova 2014J, which exploded in the nearby galaxy M82. The spectra were obtained with the HEROS echelle spectrograph installed at the 1.2 m TIGRE telescope. We present a series of 33 spectra with a resolution of R = 20, 000, which covers the important bright phases in the evolution of SN 2014J during the period from January 24 to April 1 of 2014. The spectral evolution of SN 2014J is derived empirically. The expansion velocities of the Si II P-Cygni features were measured and show the expected decreasing behaviour, beginning with a high velocity of 14,000 km/s on January 24. The Ca II infrared triplet feature shows a high velocity component with expansion velocities of > 20, 000 km/s during the early evolution apart from the normal component showing similar velocities as Si II. Further broad P-Cygni profiles are exhibited by the principal lines of Ca II, Mg II and Fe II. The TIGRE SN 2014J spectra also resolve several very sharp Na I D doublet absorption components. Our analysis suggests interesting substructures in the interstellar medium of the host galaxy M82, as well as in our Milky Way, confirming other work on this SN. We were able to identify the interstellar absorption of M82 in the lines of Ca II H & K at 3933 and 3968 A as well as K I at 7664 and 7698 A. Furthermore, we confirm several Diffuse Interstellar Bands, at wavelengths of 6196, 6283, 6376, 6379 and 6613 A and give their measured equivalent widths.
  • We present an interface between the (magneto-) hydrodynamics code PLUTO and the plasma simulation and spectral synthesis code CLOUDY. By combining these codes, we constructed a new photoionization hydrodynamics solver: The PLUTO-CLOUDY Interface (TPCI), which is well suited to simulate photoevaporative flows under strong irradiation. The code includes the electromagnetic spectrum from X-rays to the radio range and solves the photoionization and chemical network of the 30 lightest elements. TPCI follows an iterative numerical scheme: First, the equilibrium state of the medium is solved for a given radiation field by CLOUDY, resulting in a net radiative heating or cooling. In the second step, the latter influences the (magneto-) hydrodynamic evolution calculated by PLUTO. Here, we validated the one-dimensional version of the code on the basis of four test problems: Photoevaporation of a cool hydrogen cloud, cooling of coronal plasma, formation of a Stroemgren sphere, and the evaporating atmosphere of a hot Jupiter. This combination of an equilibrium photoionization solver with a general MHD code provides an advanced simulation tool applicable to a variety of astrophysical problems.
  • Giant gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience strong irradiation. In extreme cases photoevaporation causes a transonic, planetary wind and the persistent mass loss can possibly affect the planetary evolution. We have identified nine hot Jupiter systems in the vicinity of the Sun, in which expanded planetary atmospheres should be detectable through Lyman alpha transit spectroscopy according to predictions. We use X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton of seven of these targets to derive the high-energy irradiation level of the planetary atmospheres and the resulting mass loss rates. We further derive improved Lyman alpha luminosity estimates for the host stars including interstellar absorption. According to our estimates WASP-80 b, WASP-77 b, and WASP-43 b experience the strongest mass loss rates, exceeding the mass loss rate of HD 209458 b, where an expanded atmosphere has been confirmed. Furthermore, seven out of nine targets might be amenable to Lyman alpha transit spectroscopy. Finally, we check the possibility of angular momentum transfer from the hot Jupiters to the host stars in the three binary systems among our sample, but find only weak indications for increased stellar rotation periods of WASP-77 and HAT-P-20.
  • HD 181068 is the only compact, triply eclipsing, hierarchical triple system containing a giant star known to date. With its central, highly-active G-type giant orbited by a close pair of main-sequence dwarfs, the system is ideal to study tidal interactions. We carried out a multiwavelength study to characterize the magnetic activity of the HD 181068 system. To this end, we obtained in- and out-of-eclipse X-ray snapshots with XMM-Newton and an optical spectrum, which we analyzed along with the Kepler light-curve. The primary giant shows strong quiescent X-ray emission at a level of 2e31 ergs, an S-index of 0.41 +/- 0.01, and marked white-light flares releasing up to 6e38 erg in the Kepler-band. During the second X-ray observation, we found a three-times elevated -- yet decaying -- level of X-ray emission, which might be due to an X-ray flare. The high level of magnetic activity is compatible with the previously reported absence of solar-like oscillations in the giant, whose atmosphere, however, undergoes tidally-induced oscillations imposed by the changing configuration of the dwarf-binary. We found that the driving force exciting these oscillations is comparable to the disturbances produced by a typical hot Jupiter, making the system a potential test bed to study the effects of tidal interactions also present in planetary systems.
  • We study the chromosphere and corona of the ultra-fast rotator AB Dor A at high temporal and spectral resolution using simultaneous observations with XMM-Newton in the X-rays, VLT/UVES in the optical, and the ATCA in the radio. Our optical spectra have a resolving power of ~50 000 with a time cadence of ~1 min. Our observations continuously cover more than one rotational period and include both quiescent periods and three flaring events of different strengths. From the X-ray observations we investigated the variations in coronal temperature, emission measure, densities, and abundance. We interpreted our data in terms of a loop model. From the optical data we characterise the flaring chromospheric material using numerous emission lines that appear in the course of the flares. A detailed analysis of the line shapes and line centres allowed us to infer physical characteristics of the flaring chromosphere and to coarsely localise the flare event on the star. We specifically used the optical high-cadence spectra to demonstrate that both, turbulent and Stark broadening are present during the first ten minutes of the first flare. Also, in the first few minutes of this flare, we find short-lived (one to several minutes) emission subcomponents in the H{\alpha} and Ca ii K lines, which we interpret as flare-connected shocks owing to their high intrinsic velocities. Combining the space-based data with the results of our optical spectroscopy, we derive flare-filling factors. Finally, comparing X-ray, optical broadband, and line emission, we find a correlation for two of the three flaring events, while there is no clear correlation for one event. Also, we do not find any correlation of the radio data to any other observed data.
  • Protostellar jets are tightly connected to the accretion process and regulate the angular momentum balance of accreting star-disk systems. The DG Tau jet is one of the best-studied protostellar jets and contains plasma with temperatures ranging over three orders of magnitude within the innermost 50 AU of the jet. We present new Hubble Space Telescope (HST) far ultraviolet (FUV) long-slit spectra spatially resolving the C IV emission (T~1e5 K) from the jet for the first time, and quasi-simultaneous HST observations of optical forbidden emission lines ([O I], [N II], [S II] and [O III]) and fluorescent H2 lines. The C IV emission peaks at 42 AU from the stellar position and has a FWHM of 52 AU along the jet. Its deprojected velocity of around 200 km/s decreases monotonically away from the driving source. In addition, we compare our HST data with the X-ray emission from the DG Tau jet. We investigate the requirements to explain the data by an initially hot jet compared to local heating. Both scenarios indicate a mass loss by the T~1e5 K jet of ~1e-9 Msun/year, i.e., between the values for the lower temperature jet (T~1e4 K) and the hotter X-ray emitting part (T>1e6 K). However, a simple initially hot wind requires a large launching region (~1 AU), and we therefore favor local heating.
  • Young stellar objects often drive powerful bipolar outflows which evolve on time scales of a few years. An increasing number of these outflows has been detected in X-rays implying the existence of million degree plasma almost co-spatial with the lower temperature gas observed in the optical and near-IR. The details of the heating and cooling processes of the X-ray emitting part of these so-called Herbig-Haro objects are still ambiguous, e.g., whether the cooling is dominated by expansion, radiation or thermal conduction. We present a second epoch Chandra observation of the first X-ray detected Herbig-Haro object (HH 2) and derive the proper-motion of the X-ray emitting plasma and its cooling history. We argue that the most likely explanation for the constancy of the X-ray luminosity, the alignment with the optical emission and the proper-motion is that the cooling is dominated by radiative losses leading to cooling times exceeding a decade. We explain that a strong shock caused by fast material ramming into slower gas in front of it about ten years ago can explain the X-ray emission while being compatible with the available multi-wavelength data of HH 2.
  • We use X-ray observations of the nearby binaries 61 Cyg A/B (K5V and K7V) and Alpha Cen A/B (G2V and K1V) to study the long-term evolution of magnetic activity in weakly to moderately active G + K dwarfs over nearly a decade. Specifically we search for X-ray activity cycles and related coronal changes and compare them to the solar behavior. For 61 Cyg A we find a regular coronal activity cycle analog to its 7.3 yr chromospheric cycle. The X-ray brightness variations are with a factor of three significantly lower than on the Sun, yet the changes of coronal properties resemble the solar behavior with larger variations occurring in the respective hotter plasma components. 61 Cyg B does not show a clear cyclic coronal trend so far, but the X-ray data matches the more irregular chromospheric cycle. Both Alpha Cen stars exhibit significant long-term X-ray variability. Alpha Cen A shows indications for cyclic variability of an order of magnitude with a period of about 12-15 years; the Alpha Cen B data suggests an X-ray cycle with an amplitude of about six to eight and a period of 8-9 years. The sample stars exhibit X-ray luminosities ranging between Lx < 1x10^26 - 3x10^27 erg s^-1 in the 0.2-2.0 keV band and have coronae dominated by cool plasma with variable average temperatures of around 1.0-2.5 MK. We find that coronal activity cycles are apparently a common phenomenon in older, slowly rotating G and K stars. The spectral changes of the coronal X-ray emission over the cycles are solar-like in all studied targets.
  • The G0V dwarf TrES-2A, which is transited by a hot Jupiter, is one of the main short-cadence targets of the Kepler telescope and, therefore, among the photometrically best-studied planetary systems known today. Given the near-grazing geometry of the planetary orbit, TrES-2 offers an outstanding opportunity to search for changes in its orbital geometry. Our study focuses on the secular change in orbital inclination reported in previous studies. We present a joint analysis of the first four quarters of Kepler photometry together with the publicly available ground-based data obtained since the discovery of TrES-2b in 2006. We use a common approach based on the latest information regarding the visual companion of TrES-2A and stellar limb darkening to further refine the orbital parameters. We find that the Kepler observations rule out a secular inclination change of previously claimed order as well as variations of the transit timing, however, they also show slight indication for further variability in the inclination which remains marginally significant.
  • High-energy irradiation of exoplanets has been identified to be a key influence on the stability of these planets' atmospheres. So far, irradiation-driven mass-loss has been observed only in two Hot Jupiters, and the observational data remain even more sparse in the super-earth regime. We present an investigation of the high-energy emission in the CoRoT-7 system, which hosts the first known transiting super-earth. To characterize the high-energy XUV radiation field into which the rocky planets CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c are immersed, we analyzed a 25 ks XMM-Newton observation of the host star. Our analysis yields the first clear (3.5 sigma) X-ray detection of CoRoT-7. We determine a coronal temperature of ca. 3 MK and an X-ray luminosity of 3*10^28 erg/s. The level of XUV irradiation on CoRoT-7b amounts to ca. 37000 erg/cm^2/s. Current theories for planetary evaporation can only provide an order-of-magnitude estimate for the planetary mass loss; assuming that CoRoT-7b has formed as a rocky planet, we estimate that CoRoT-7b evaporates at a rate of about 1.3*10^11 g/s and has lost ca. 4-10 earth masses in total.
  • A type stars are expected to be X-ray dark, yet weak emission has been detected from several objects in this class. We present new Chandra/HRC-I observations of the A5 V star \beta{} Pictoris. It is clearly detected with a flux of 9+-2 10^{-4} counts/s. In comparison with previous data this constrains the emission mechanism and we find that the most likely explanation is an optically thin, collisionally dominated, thermal emission component with a temperature around 1.1 MK. We interpret this component as a very cool and dim corona, with \log L_X/L_{bol}=-8.2 (0.2-2.0 keV). Thus, it seems that \beta{} Pictoris shares more characteristics with cool stars than previously thought.
  • Aims: We demonstrate the universal character of the quiet-Sun chromosphere among inactive stars (solar-type and giants). By assessing the main physical processes, we shed new light on some common observational phenomena. Methods: We discuss measurements of the solar Mt. Wilson S-index, obtained by the Hamburg Robotic Telescope around the extreme minimum year 2009, and compare the established chromospheric basal Ca II K line flux to the Mt. Wilson S-index data of inactive ("flat activity") stars, including giants. Results: During the unusually deep and extended activity minimum of 2009, the Sun reached S-index values considerably lower than in any of its previously observed minima. In several brief periods, the Sun coincided exactly with the S-indices of inactive ("flat", presumed Maunder Minimum-type) solar analogues of the Mt. Wilson sample; at the same time, the solar visible surface was also free of any plages or remaining weak activity regions. The corresponding minimum Ca II K flux of the quiet Sun and of the presumed Maunder Minimum-type stars in the Mt. Wilson sample are found to be identical to the corresponding Ca II K chromospheric basal flux limit. Conclusions: We conclude that the quiet-Sun chromosphere is a universal phenomenon among inactive stars. Its mixed-polarity magnetic field, generated by a local, "fast" turbulent dynamo finally provides a natural explanation for the minimal soft X-ray emission observed for inactive stars. Given such a local dynamo also works for giant chromospheres, albeit on larger length scales, i.e., l ~ R/g, with R and g as stellar radius and surface gravity, respectively, the existence of giant spicular phenomena and the guidance of mechanical energy toward the acceleration zone of cool stellar winds along flux-tubes have now become traceable.
  • We report simultaneous observations of the nearby flare star Proxima Centauri with VLT/UVES and XMM-Newton over three nights in March 2009. Our optical and X-ray observations cover the star's quiescent state, as well as its flaring activity and allow us to probe the stellar atmospheric conditions from the photosphere into the chromosphere, and then the corona during its different activity stages. Using the X-ray data, we investigate variations in coronal densities and abundances and infer loop properties for an intermediate-sized flare. The optical data are used to investigate the magnetic field and its possible variability, to construct an emission line list for the chromosphere, and use certain emission lines to construct physical models of Proxima Centauri's chromosphere. We report the discovery of a weak optical forbidden Fe xiii line at 3388 AA during the more active states of Proxima Centauri. For the intermediate flare, we find two secondary flare events that may originate in neighbouring loops, and discuss the line asymmetries observed during this flare in H i, He i, and Ca ii lines. The high time-resolution in the H alpha line highlights strong temporal variations in the observed line asymmetries, which re-appear during a secondary flare event. We also present theoretical modelling with the stellar atmosphere code PHOENIX to construct flaring chromospheric models.
  • Protostars are actively accreting matter and they drive spectacular, dynamic outflows, which evolve on timescales of years. X-ray emission from these jets has been detected only in a few cases and little is known about its time evolution. We present a new Chandra observation of L1551 IRS 5's jet in the context of all available X-ray data of this object. Specifically, we perform a spatially resolved spectral analysis of the X-ray emission and find that (a) the total X-ray luminosity is constant over almost one decade, (b) the majority of the X-rays appear to be always located close to the driving source, (c) there is a clear trend in the photon energy as a function of the distance to the driving source indicating that the plasma is cooler at larger distances and (d) the X-ray emission is located in a small volume which is unresolved perpendicular to the jet axis by Chandra. A comparison of our X-ray data of the L1551 IRS 5 jet both with models as well as X-ray observations of other protostellar jets shows that a base/standing shock is a likely and plausible explanation for the apparent constancy of the observed X-ray emission. Internal shocks are also consistent with the observed morphology if the supply of jet material by the ejection of new blobs is sufficiently constant. We conclude that the study of the X-ray emission of protostellar jet sources allows us to diagnose the innermost regions close to the acceleration region of the outflows.
  • Close-in, giant planets are expected to influence their host stars via tidal or magnetic interaction. But are these effects strong enough in suitable targets known so far to be observed with today's instrumentation? The upsilon And system, an F8V star with a Hot Jupiter, was claimed to undergo cyclic changes in chromospheric activity indicators with its innermost planet's period. We want to investigate the stellar chromospheric and coronal activity over several months. We therefore monitored the star in X-rays as well as at optical wavelengths to test coronal and chromospheric activity indicators for planet-induced variability, making use of the Chandra X-ray Observatory as well as the echelle spectrographs FOCES and HRS at Calar Alto (Spain) and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (Texas, US). The stellar activity level is low, as seen both in X-rays as in Ca II line fluxes; the chromospheric data show variability with the stellar rotation period. We do not find activity variations in X-rays or in the optical which can be traced back to the planet. Gaining observational evidence for star-planet interactions in X-rays remains challenging.