• MoTe$_2$ is an exfoliable transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) which crystallizes in three symmetries, the semiconducting trigonal-prismatic $2H-$phase, the semimetallic $1T^{\prime}$ monoclinic phase, and the semimetallic orthorhombic $T_d$ structure. The $2H-$phase displays a band gap of $\sim 1$ eV making it appealing for flexible and transparent optoelectronics. The $T_d-$phase is predicted to possess unique topological properties which might lead to topologically protected non-dissipative transport channels. Recently, it was argued that it is possible to locally induce phase-transformations in TMDs, through chemical doping, local heating, or electric-field to achieve ohmic contacts or to induce useful functionalities such as electronic phase-change memory elements. The combination of semiconducting and topological elements based upon the same compound, might produce a new generation of high performance, low dissipation optoelectronic elements. Here, we show that it is possible to engineer the phases of MoTe$_2$ through W substitution by unveiling the phase-diagram of the Mo$_{1-x}$W$_x$Te$_2$ solid solution which displays a semiconducting to semimetallic transition as a function of $x$. We find that only $\sim 8$ \% of W stabilizes the $T_d-$phase at room temperature. Photoemission spectroscopy, indicates that this phase possesses a Fermi surface akin to that of WTe$_2$.
  • We report the use of time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission to map the bound, unoccupied electronic structure of the weakly coupled graphene/Ir(111) system. The energy, dispersion, and lifetime of the lowest three image-potential states are measured. In addition, the weak interaction between Ir and graphene permits observation of resonant transitions from an unquenched Shockley-type surface state of the Ir substrate to graphene/Ir image-potential states. The image-potential-state lifetimes are comparable to those of mid-gap clean metal surfaces. Evidence of localization of the excited electrons on single-atom-layer graphene islands is provided by coverage-dependent measurements.