• Using isochronous mass spectrometry at the experimental storage ring CSRe in Lanzhou, the masses of $^{82}$Zr and $^{84}$Nb were measured for the first time with an uncertainty of $\sim 10$ keV, and the masses of $^{79}$Y, $^{81}$Zr, and $^{83}$Nb were re-determined with a higher precision. %The latter differ significantly from their literature values. The latter are significantly less bound than their literature values. Our new and accurate masses remove the irregularities of the mass surface in this region of the nuclear chart. Our results do not support the predicted island of pronounced low $\alpha$ separation energies for neutron-deficient Mo and Tc isotopes, making the formation of Zr-Nb cycle in the $rp$-process unlikely. The new proton separation energy of $^{83}$Nb was determined to be 490(400)~keV smaller than that in the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2012. This partly removes the overproduction of the $p$-nucleus $^{84}$Sr relative to the neutron-deficient molybdenum isotopes in the previous $\nu p$-process simulations.
  • The $^{11}$C($\alpha$, p) reaction is an important $\alpha$-induced reaction competing with $\beta$-limited hydrogen-burning processes in high-temperature explosive stars. We directly measured its reaction cross sections both for the ground-state transition ($\alpha$, $p_{0}$) and the excited-state transitions ($\alpha$, $p_{1}$) and ($\alpha$, $p_{2}$) at relevant stellar energies 1.3 - 4.5 MeV by an extended thick-target method featuring time of flight for the first time. We revised the reaction rate by numerical integration including the ($\alpha$, $p_{1}$) and ($\alpha$, $p_{2}$) contributions and also low-lying resonances of ($\alpha$, $p_{0}$) using both the present and the previous experimental data which were totally neglected in the previous compilation works. The present total reaction rate lies between the previous ($\alpha$, $p_{0}$) rate and the total rate of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculation, which is consistent with the relevant explosive hydrogen-burning scenarios such as the $\nu p$-process.
  • The extent of nucleosynthesis in models of type I X-ray bursts and the associated impact on the energy released in these explosive events are sensitive to nuclear masses and reaction rates around the $^{64}$Ge waiting point. Using the well known mass of $^{64}$Ge, the recently measured $^{65}$As mass, and large-scale shell model calculations, we have determined new thermonuclear rates of the $^{64}$Ge($p$,$\gamma$)$^{65}$As and $^{65}$As($p$,$\gamma$)$^{66}$Se reactions with reliable uncertainties. The new reaction rates differ significantly from previously published rates. Using the new data we analyze the impact of the new rates and the remaining nuclear physics uncertainties on the $^{64}$Ge waiting point in a number of representative one-zone X-ray burst models. We find that in contrast to previous work, when all relevant uncertainties are considered, a strong $^{64}$Ge $rp$-process waiting point cannot be ruled out. The nuclear physics uncertainties strongly affect X-ray burst model predictions of the synthesis of $^{64}$Zn, the synthesis of nuclei beyond $A=64$, energy generation, and burst light curve. We also identify key nuclear uncertainties that need to be addressed to determine the role of the $^{64}$Ge waiting point in X-ray bursts. These include the remaining uncertainty in the $^{65}$As mass, the uncertainty of the $^{66}$Se mass, and the remaining uncertainty in the $^{65}$As($p$,$\gamma$)$^{66}$Se reaction rate, which mainly originates from uncertain resonance energies.
  • Revolution frequency measurements of individual ions in storage rings require sophisticated timing detectors. One of common approaches for such detectors is the detection of secondary electrons released from a thin foil due to penetration of the stored ions. A new method based on the analysis of intensities of secondary electrons was developed which enables determination of the charge of each ion simultaneously with the measurement of its revolution frequency. Although the mass-over-charge ratios of $^{51}$Co$^{27+}$ and $^{34}$Ar$^{18+}$ ions are almost identical, and therefore, the ions can not be resolved in a storage ring, by applying the new method the mass excess of the short-lived $^{51}$Co is determined for the first time to be ME($^{51}$Co)=-27342(48) keV. Shell-model calculations in the $fp$-shell nuclei compared to the new data indicate the need to include isospin-nonconserving forces.
  • All the 16F levels are unbound by proton emission. To date the four low-lying 16F levels below 1 MeV have been experimentally identified with well established spin-parity values and excitation energies with an accuracy of 4 - 6 keV. However, there are still considerable discrepancies for their level widths. The present work aims to explore these level widths through an independent method. The angular distributions of the 15N(7Li, 6Li)16N reaction leading to the first four states in 16N were measured using a high-precision Q3D magnetic spectrograph. The neutron spectroscopic factors and the asymptotic normalization coefficients for these states in 16N were then derived based on distorted wave Born approximation analysis. The proton widths of the four low-lying resonant states in 16F were obtained according to charge symmetry of strong interaction.
  • Fluorine is a key element for nucleosynthetic studies since it is extremely sensitive to the physical conditions within stars. The astrophysical site to produce fluorine is suggested to be asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In these stars the 15N(n, g)16N reaction could affect the abundance of fluorine by competing with 15N(a, g)19F. The 15N(n, g)16N reaction rate depends directly on the neutron spectroscopic factors of the low-lying states in 16N. The angular distributions of the 15N(7Li, 6Li)16N reaction populating the ground state and the first three excited states in 16N are measured using a Q3D magnetic spectrograph and are used to derive the spectroscopic factors of these states based on distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) analysis. The spectroscopic factors of these four states are extracted to be 0.96+-0.09, 0.69+-0.09, 0.84+-0.08 and 0.65+-0.08, respectively. Based on the new spectroscopic factors we derive the 15N(n,g)16N reaction rate. The accuracy and precision of the spectroscopic factors are enhanced due to the first application of high-precision magnetic spectrograph for resolving the closely-spaced 16N levels which can not be achieved in most recent measurement. The present result demonstrates that two levels corresponding to neutron transfers to the 2s1/2 orbit in 16N are not so good single-particle levels although 15N is a closed neutron-shell nucleus. This finding is contrary to the shell model expectation. The present work also provides an independent examination to shed some light on the existing discrepancies in the spectroscopic factors and the 15N(n, g)16N rate.
  • The evolution of massive stars with very low-metallicities depends critically on the amount of CNO nuclides which they produce. The $^{12}$N($p$,\,$\gamma$)$^{13}$O reaction is an important branching point in the rap-processes, which are believed to be alternative paths to the slow 3$\alpha$ process for producing CNO seed nuclei and thus could change the fate of massive stars. In the present work, the angular distribution of the $^2$H($^{12}$N,\,$^{13}$O)$n$ proton transfer reaction at $E_{\mathrm{c.m.}}$ = 8.4 MeV has been measured for the first time. Based on the Johnson-Soper approach, the square of the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for the virtual decay of $^{13}$O$_\mathrm{g.s.}$ $\rightarrow$ $^{12}$N + $p$ was extracted to be 3.92 $\pm$ 1.47 fm$^{-1}$ from the measured angular distribution and utilized to compute the direct component in the $^{12}$N($p$,\,$\gamma$)$^{13}$O reaction. The direct astrophysical S-factor at zero energy was then found to be 0.39 $\pm$ 0.15 keV b. By considering the direct capture into the ground state of $^{13}$O, the resonant capture via the first excited state of $^{13}$O and their interference, we determined the total astrophysical S-factors and rates of the $^{12}$N($p$,\,$\gamma$)$^{13}$O reaction. The new rate is two orders of magnitude slower than that from the REACLIB compilation. Our reaction network calculations with the present rate imply that $^{12}$N($p,\,\gamma$)$^{13}$O will only compete successfully with the $\beta^+$ decay of $^{12}$N at higher ($\sim$two orders of magnitude) densities than initially predicted.