• As many-body Floquet theory becomes more popular, it is important to find ways to connect theory with experiment. Theoretical calculations can have a periodic driving field that is always on, but experiment cannot. Hence, we need to know how long a driving field is needed before the system starts to look like the periodically driven Floquet system. We answer this question here for noninteracting band electrons in the infinite-dimensional limit by studying the properties of the system under pulsed driving fields and illustrating how they approach the Floquet limit. Our focus is on determining the minimal pulse lengths needed to recover the qualitative and semiquantitative Floquet theory results.
  • In a large transverse field, there is an energy cost associated with flipping spins along the axis of the field. This penalty can be employed to relate the transverse-field Ising model in a large field to the XY model in no field (when measurements are performed at the right stroboscopic times). We describe the details for how this relationship works and, in particular, we also show under what circumstances it fails. We examine wavefunction overlap between the two models and observables, such as spin-spin Green's functions. In general, the mapping is quite robust at short times, but will ultimately fail if the run time becomes too long. There is also a trade-off between the length of time one can run a simulation out to and the time jitter of the stroboscopic measurements that must be balanced when planning to employ this mapping.
  • We present a theory for charge and heat transport parallel to the interfaces of a multilayer (ML) in which the interfacing gives rise the redistribution of the electronic charges. The ensuing electrical field couples self-consistently to the itinerant electrons, so that the properties of the ML crucially depend on an interplay between the on-site Coulomb forces and the long range electrostatic forces. The ML is described by the Falicov-Kimball model and the self-consistent solution is obtained by iterating simultaneously the DMFT and the Poisson equations. This yields the reconstructed charge profile, the electrical potential, the planar density of states, the transport function, and the transport coefficients of the device. We find that a heterostructure built of two Mott-Hubbard insulators exhibits, in a large temperature interval, a linear conductivity and a large temperature-independent thermopower. The charge and energy currents are confined to the central part of the ML. Our results indicate that correlated multilayers have the potential for applications; by tuning the band shift and the Coulomb correlation on the central planes, we can bring the chemical potential in the immediate proximity of the Mott-Hubbard gap edge and optimize the transport properties of the device. In such a heterostructure, a small gate voltage can easily induce a MI transition. This switching does not involve the diffusion of electrons over macroscopic distances and it is much faster than in ordinary semiconductors. Furthermore, the right combination of strongly correlated materials with small ZT can produce, theoretically at least, a heterostructure with a large ZT.
  • One of the challenges for fermionic cold atom experiments in optical lattices is to cool the systems to low enough temperature that they can form quantum degenerate ordered phases. In particular, there has been significant work in trying to find the antiferromagnetic phase transition of the Hubbard model in three dimensions, without success. Here, we attack this problem from a different angle by enhancing the ordering temperature via an increase in the degeneracy of the atomic species trapped in the optical lattice. In addition to developing the general theory, we also discuss some potential systems where one might be able to achieve these results experimentally.
  • We examine the exact equation of motion for the relaxation of populations of strongly correlated electrons after a nonequilibrium excitation by a pulsed field, and prove that the populations do not change when the Green's functions have no average time dependence. We show how the average time dependence enters into the equation of motion to lowest order and describe what governs the relaxation process of the electron populations in the long-time limit. While this result may appear, on the surface, to be required by any steady-state solution, the proof is nontrivial, and provides new critical insight into how nonequilibrium populations relax, which goes beyond the assumption that they thermalize via a simple relaxation rate determined by the imaginary part of the self-energy, or that they can be described by a quasi-equilibrium condition with a Fermi-Dirac distribution and a time-dependent temperature. We also discuss the implications of this result to approximate theories, which may not satisfy the exact relation in the equation of motion.
  • We examine the time evolution of an asymmetric Hubbard dimer, which has a different on-site interaction on the two sites. The Hamiltonian has a time-dependent hopping term, which can be employed to describe an electric field (which creates a Hamiltonian with complex matrix elements), or it can describe a modulation of the lattice (which has real matrix elements). By examining the symmetries under spin and pseudospin, we show that the former case involves at most a 3 x 3 block---it can be mapped onto the time evolution of a time-independent Hamiltonian, so the dynamics can be evaluated analytically and exactly (by solving a nontrivial cubic equation). We also show that the latter case reduces to at most 2 x 2 blocks, and hence the time evolution for a single Trotter step can be determined exactly, but the time evolution generically requires a Trotter product.
  • In this review, we develop the formalism employed to describe charge-density-wave insulators in pump/probe experiments using ultra short driving pulses of light. The theory emphasizes exact results in the simplest model for a charge-density wave insulator (given by a noninteracting systems with two bands and a gap) and by employing nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory to solve the Falicov-Kimball model in its ordered phase. We show both how to develop the formalism and how the solutions behave. Care is taken to describe the details behind these calculations and to show how to verify their accuracy via sum-rule constraints.
  • We describe different approximations associated with employing a constant matrix element for the coupling of light to multiband electrons in the context of time-resolved angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TR-ARPES). In particular, we demonstrate that the constant matrix approximation only holds for one of the coordinate representations, and changing to other bases, requires including nonconstant corrections to the matrix element. We also discuss some simplifying approximations, where a constant matrix element is employed in multiple bases, and the consequences of this further approximation (especially with respect to the TR-ARPES signal no longer being nonnegative). We also discuss issues related to gauge invariance of the final spectra.
  • Recent developments in the techniques of ultrafast pump-probe photoemission have made possible the search for collective modes in strongly correlated systems out of equilibrium. Including inelastic scattering processes and a retarded interaction, we simulate time- and angle- resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) to study the amplitude mode of a d-wave superconductor, a collective mode excited through the nonlinear light-matter coupling to the pump pulse. We find that the amplitude mode oscillations of the d-wave order parameter occur in phase at a single frequency that is twice the quasi-steady-state maximum gap size after pumping. We comment on the necessary conditions for detecting the amplitude mode in trARPES experiments.
  • We review recent work on the theory for pump/probe photoemission spectroscopy of electron-phonon mediated superconductors in both the normal and the superconducting states. We describe the formal developments that allow one to solve the Migdal-Eliashberg theory in nonequilibrium for an ultrashort laser pumping field, and explore the solutions which illustrate the relaxation as energy is transferred from electrons to phonons. We focus on exact results emanating from sum rules and approximate numerical results which describe rules of thumb for relaxation processes. In addition, in the superconducting state, we describe how Higg's oscillations can be excited due to the nonlinear coupling with the electric field and how pumping the system can enhance superconductivity.
  • We determine the exact time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy for a nesting driven charge-density-wave (described by the spinless Falicov-Kimball model within dynamical mean-field theory). The pump-probe experiment involves two light pulses: the first is an ultrashort intense pump pulse that excites the system into nonequilibrium, and the second is a lower amplitude higher frequency probe pulse that photoexcites electrons. We examine three different cases: the strongly correlated metal, the quantum-critical charge density wave and the critical Mott insulator. Our results show that the quantum critical charge density wave has an ultra efficient relaxation channel that allows electrons to be de-excited during the pump pulse, resulting in little net excitation. In contrast, the metal and the Mott insulator show excitations that are closer to what one expects from these systems. In addition, the pump field produces spectral band narrowing, peak sharpening, and a spectral gap reduction, all of which rapidly return to their field free values after the pump is over.
  • We develop a generalized gradient expansion of the inhomogeneous dynamical mean-field theory method for determining properties of ultracold atoms in a trap. This approach goes beyond the well-known local density approximation and at higher temperatures, in the normal phase, it shows why the local density approximation works so well, since the local density and generalized gradient approximations are essentially indistinguishable from each other (and from the exact solution within full inhomogeneous dynamical mean-field theory). But because the generalized gradient expansion only involves nearest-neighbor corrections, it does not work as well at low temperatures, when the systems enter into ordered phases. This is primarily due to the problem that ordered phases often satisfy some global constraints which determine the spatial ordering pattern, and the local density and generalized gradient approximations are not able to impose those kinds of constraints; they also overestimate the tendency to order. The theory is applied to phase separation of different mass fermionic mixtures represented by the Falicov-Kimball model and to determining the entropy per particle of a fermionic system represented by the Hubbard model. The generalized gradient approximation is a useful diagnostic for the accuracy of the local density approximation---when both methods agree, they are likely accurate, when they disagree, neither is likely to be correct.
  • In complex materials various interactions play important roles in determining the material properties. Angle Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARPES) has been used to study these processes by resolving the complex single particle self energy $\Sigma(E)$ and quantifying how quantum interactions modify bare electronic states. However, ambiguities in the measurement of the real part of the self energy and an intrinsic inability to disentangle various contributions to the imaginary part of the self energy often leave the implications of such measurements open to debate. Here we employ a combined theoretical and experimental treatment of femtosecond time-resolved ARPES (tr-ARPES) and show how measuring the population dynamics using tr-ARPES can be used to separate electron-boson interactions from electron-electron interactions. We demonstrate the analysis of a well-defined electron-boson interaction in the unoccupied spectrum of the cuprate Bi$_{2}$Sr$_{2}$CaCu$_{2}$O$_{8+x}$ characterized by an excited population decay time constant $\tau_{QP}$ that maps directly to a discrete component of the equilibrium self energy not readily isolated by static ARPES experiments.
  • Recent work proposed a variant on Ramsey interferometry for coupled spin-$1/2$ systems that directly measures the retarded spin-spin Green's function. We expand on that work by investigating nonequilibrium retarded spin-spin Green's functions within the transverse-field Ising model. We derive the lowest four spectral moments to understand the short-time behavior and we employ a Lehmann-like representation to determine the spectral behavior. We simulate a Ramsey protocol for a nonequilibrium quantum spin system that consists of a coherent superposition of the ground state and diabatically excited higher-energy states via a temporally ramped transverse magnetic field. We then apply the Ramsey spectroscopy protocol to the final Hamiltonian, which has a constant transverse field. The short-time behavior directly relates to Lieb-Robinson bounds for the transport of many-body correlations, while the long-time behavior relates to the excitation spectra of the Hamiltonian. Compressive sensing is employed in the data analysis to efficiently extract that spectra.
  • We model the bang-bang optimization protocol as a shortcut to adiabaticity in the ground-state preparation of an ion-trap-based quantum simulator. Compared to a locally adiabatic evolution, the bang-bang protocol produces a somewhat lower ground-state probability, but its implementation is so much simpler than the locally adiabatic approach, that it remains an excellent choice to use for maximizing ground-state preparation in systems that cannot be solved with conventional computers. We describe how one can optimize the shortcut and provide specific details for how it can be implemented with current ion-trap-based quantum simulators.
  • Using the Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh formalism, we employ nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory to exactly solve for the nonlinear response of an electron-mediated charge-density-wave-ordered material. We examine both the dc current and the order parameter of the conduction electrons as the ordered system is driven by the electric field. Although the formalism we develop applies to all models, for concreteness, we examine the charge-density-wave phase of the Falicov-Kimball model, which displays a number of anomalous behaviors including the appearance of subgap density of states as the temperature increases. These subgap states should have a significant impact on transport properties, particularly the nonlinear response of the system to a large dc electric field.
  • The goal of adiabatic ground-state preparation is to start a simple quantum system in its ground state and adiabatically evolve the Hamiltonian to a complex one, maintaining the ground state throughout the evolution. In ion-trap-based quantum simulations, coherence times are too short to allow for adiabatic evolution for large chains, so the system evolves diabatically, creating excitations to higher energy states. Because the probability for diabatic excitation depends exponentially on the excitation energy and because the thermal distribution also depends exponentially on the excitation energy, we investigate whether the diabatic excitation can create a thermal distribution; as this could serve as an alternative for creating thermal states of complex quantum systems without requiring contact with a heat bath. In this work, we explore this relationship and determine situations where diabatic excitation can approximately create such a thermal state.
  • Theoretical models of spins coupled to bosons provide a simple setting for studying a broad range of important phenomena in many-body physics, from virtually mediated interactions to decoherence and thermalization. In many atomic, molecular, and optical systems, such models also underlie the most successful attempts to engineer strong, long-ranged interactions for the purpose of entanglement generation. Especially when the coupling between the spins and bosons is strong---such that it cannot be treated perturbatively---the properties of such models are extremely challenging to calculate theoretically. Here, exact analytical expressions for nonequilibrium spin-spin correlation functions are derived for a specific model of spins coupled to bosons. The spatial structure of the coupling between spins and bosons is completely arbitrary, and thus the solution can be applied to systems in any number of dimensions. The explicit and nonperturbative inclusion of the bosons enables the study of entanglement generation (in the form of spin squeezing) even when the bosons are driven strongly and near-resonantly, and thus provides a quantitative view of the breakdown of adiabatic elimination that inevitably occurs as one pushes towards the fastest entanglement generation possible. The solution also helps elucidate the effect of finite temperature on spin squeezing. The model considered is relevant to a variety of atomic, molecular, and optical systems, such as atoms in cavities or trapped ions. As an explicit example, the results are used to quantify phonon effects in trapped ion quantum simulators, which are expected to become increasingly important as these experiments push towards larger numbers of ions.
  • One of the goals in quantum simulation is to adiabatically generate the ground state of a complicated Hamiltonian by starting with the ground state of a simple Hamiltonian and slowly evolving the system to the complicated one. If the evolution is adiabatic and the initial and final ground states are connected due to having the same symmetry, then the simulation will be successful. But in most experiments, adiabatic simulation is not possible because it would take too long, and the system has some level of diabatic excitation. In this work, we quantify the extent of the diabatic excitation even if we do not know {\it a priori} what the complicated ground state is. Since many quantum simulator platforms, like trapped ions, can measure the probabilities to be in a product state, we describe techniques that can employ these measurements to estimate the probability of being in the ground state of the system after the diabatic evolution. These techniques do not require one to know any properties about the Hamiltonian itself, nor to calculate its eigenstate properties. All the information is derived by analyzing the product-state measurements as functions of time.
  • One of the challenges with quantum simulation in ion traps is that the effective spin-spin exchange couplings are not uniform across the lattice. This can be particularly important in Penning trap realizations where the presence of an ellipsoidal boundary at the edge of the trap leads to dislocations in the crystal. By adding an additional anharmonic potential to better control interion spacing, and a triangular shaped rotating wall potential to reduce the appearance of dislocations, one can achieve better uniformity of the ionic positions. In this work, we calculate the axial phonon frequencies and the spin-spin interactions driven by a spin-dependent optical dipole force, and discuss what effects the more uniform ion spacing has on the spin simulation properties of Penning trap quantum simulators. Indeed, we find the spin-spin interactions behave more like a power law for a wide range of parameters.
  • Generating big data pervades much of physics. But some problems, which we call extreme data problems, are too large to be treated within big data science. The nonequilibrium quantum many-body problem on a lattice is just such a problem, where the Hilbert space grows exponentially with system size and rapidly becomes too large to fit on any computer (and can be effectively thought of as an infinite-sized data set). Nevertheless, much progress has been made with computational methods on this problem, which serve as a paradigm for how one can approach and attack extreme data problems. In addition, viewing these physics problems from a computer-science perspective leads to new approaches that can be tried to solve them more accurately and for longer times. We review a number of these different ideas here.
  • The control of physical properties of solids with short laser pulses is an intriguing prospect of ultrafast materials science. Continuous-wave high-frequency laser driving with circular polarization was predicted to induce a light-matter coupled new state possessing a quasi-static band structure with an energy gap and a quantum Hall effect, coined "Floquet topological insulator". Whereas the envisioned Floquet topological insulator requires well separated Floquet bands and therefore high-frequency pumping, a natural follow-up question regards the creation of Floquet-like states in graphene with realistic pump laser pulses. Here we predict that with short low-frequency laser pulses attainable in pump-probe experiments, states with local spectral gaps at the Dirac points and novel pseudospin textures can be achieved in graphene using circular light polarization. We demonstrate that time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy can track these states by measuring sizeable energy gaps and quasi-Floquet energy bands that form on femtosecond time scales. By analyzing Floquet energy level crossings and snapshots of pseudospin textures near the Dirac points, we identify transitions to new states with optically induced nontrivial changes of sublattice mixing that can lead to Berry curvature corrections of electrical transport and magnetization.
  • Ultracold mixtures of different atomic species have great promise for realizing novel many-body phenomena. In a binary mixture of femions with a large mass difference and repulsive interspecies interactions, a disordered Mott insulator phase can occur. This phase displays an incompressible total density, although the relative density remain compressible. We use strong-coupling and Monte Carlo calculations to show that this phase exists for a broad parameter region for ultracold gases confined in a harmonic trap on a three-dimensional optical lattice, for experimentally accessible values of the trap parameters.
  • The Coulomb repulsion between ions in a linear Paul trap give rise to anharmonic terms in the potential energy when expanded about the equilibrium positions. We examine the effect of these anharmonic terms on the accuracy of a quantum simulator made from trapped ions. To be concrete, we consider a linear chain of $\text{Yb}^{171+}$ ions stabilized close to the zigzag transition. We find that for typical experimental temperatures, frequencies change by no more than a factor of $0.01\%$ due to the anharmonic couplings. Furthermore, shifts in the effective spin-spin interactions (driven by a spin-dependent optical dipole force) also tend to be small for detunings to the blue of the transverse center-of-mass frequency. However, detuning the spin interactions near other frequencies can lead to nonnegligible anharmonic contributions to the effective spin-spin interactions. We also examine an odd behavior exhibited by the harmonic spin-spin interactions for a range of intermediate detunings, where nearest neighbor spins with a larger spatial separation on the ion chain interact more strongly than nearest neighbors with a smaller spatial separation.
  • We develop the theory to describe the equilibrium ion positions and phonon modes for a trapped ion quantum simulator in an oblate Paul trap that creates two-dimensional Coulomb crystals in a triangular lattice. By coupling the internal states of the ions to laser beams propagating along the symmetry axis, we study the effective Ising spin-spin interactions that are mediated via the axial phonons and are less sensitive to ion micromotion. We find that the axial mode frequencies permit the programming of Ising interactions with inverse power law spin-spin couplings that can be tuned from uniform to $r^{-3}$ with DC voltages. Such a trap could allow for interesting new geometrical configurations for quantum simulations on moderately sized systems including frustrated magnetism on triangular lattices or Aharonov-Bohm effects on ion tunneling. The trap also incorporates periodic boundary conditions around loops which could be employed to examine time crystals.