• We present a detailed study of Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of a newly discovered Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) supernova remnant (SNR), SNR J0533-7202. This object follows a horseshoe morphology, with a size 37 pc x 28 pc (1-pc uncertainty in each direction). It exhibits a radio spectrum with the intrinsic synchrotron spectral index of alpha= -0.47+-0.06 between 73 and 6 cm. We report detections of regions showing moderately high fractional polarisation at 6 cm, with a peak value of 36+-6% and a mean fractional polarisation of 12+-7%. We also estimate an average rotation measure across the remnant of -591 rad m^-2. The current lack of deep X-ray observation precludes any conclusion about high-energy emission from the remnant. The association with an old stellar population favours a thermonuclear supernova origin of the remnant.
  • NGC 7793 - S26 is an extended source (350 pc $\times$ 185 pc) previously studied in the radio, optical and x-ray domains. It has been identified as a micro-quasar which has inflated a super bubble. We used Integral Field Spectra from the Wide Field Spectrograph on the ANU 2.3 m telescope to analyse spectra between 3600--7000 \AA. This allowed us to derive fluxes and line ratios for selected nebular lines. Applying radiative shock model diagnostics, we estimate shock velocities, densities, radiative ages and pressures across the object. We show that S26 is just entering its radiative phase, and that the northern and western regions are dominated by partially-radiative shocks due to a lower density ISM in these directions. We determine a velocity of expansion along the jet of 330 km s$^{-1}$, and a velocity of expansion of the bubble in the minor axis direction of 132 km s$^{-1}$. We determine the age of the structure to be $4.1\times10^5$ yr, and the jet energy flux to be $ (4-10)\times10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$ The jet appears to be collimated within $\sim0.25$ deg, and to undergo very little precession. If the relativistic $\beta \sim 1/3$, then some 4 M$_{\odot}$ of relativistic matter has already been processed through the jet. We conclude that the central object in S26 is probably a Black Hole with a mass typical of the ultra-luminous X-ray source population which is currently consuming a fairly massive companion through Roche Lobe accretion.
  • The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is rich in supernova remnants (SNRs) which can be investigated in detail with radio, optical and X-ray observations. SNR J0453-6829 is an X-ray and radio-bright remnant in the LMC, within which previous studies revealed the presence of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN), making it one of the most interesting SNRs in the Local Group of galaxies. We study the emission of SNR J0453-6829 to improve our understanding of its morphology, spectrum, and thus the emission mechanisms in the shell and the PWN of the remnant. We obtained new radio data with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and analysed archival XMM-Newton observations of SNR J0453-6829. We studied the morphology of SNR J0453-6829 from radio, optical and X-ray images and investigated the energy spectra in the different parts of the remnant. Our radio results confirm that this LMC SNR hosts a typical PWN. The prominent central core of the PWN exhibits a radio spectral index alpha_Core of -0.04+/-0.04, while in the rest of the SNR shell the spectral slope is somewhat steeper with alpha_Shell = -0.43+/-0.01. We detect regions with a mean polarisation of P ~ (12+/-4)% at 6 cm and (9+/-2)% at 3 cm. The full remnant is of roughly circular shape with dimensions of (31+/-1) pc x (29+/-1) pc. The spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton EPIC and RGS spectra allowed us to derive physical parameters for the SNR. Somewhat depending on the spectral model, we obtain for the remnant a shock temperature of around 0.2 keV and estimate the dynamical age to 12000-15000 years. Using a Sedov model we further derive an electron density in the X-ray emitting material of 1.56 cm^-3, typical for LMC remnants, a large swept-up mass of 830 solar masses, and an explosion energy of 7.6 x 10^50 erg. These parameters indicate a well evolved SNR with an X-ray spectrum dominated by emission from the swept-up material.
  • We present two new catalogues of radio-continuum sources in the field of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). These catalogues contain sources found at 4800 MHz (lambda=6 cm) and 8640 MHz (lambda=3 cm). Some 457 sources have been detected at 3 cm with 601 sources at 6 cm created from new high-sensitivity and resolution radio-continuum images of the SMC from Crawford et al. (2011).
  • We report the ATCA and ROSAT detection of Supernova Remnant (SNR) J0529--6653 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) which is positioned in the projected vicinity of the known radio pulsar PSR B0529-66. In the radio-continuum frequencies, this LMC object follows a typical SNR structure of a shell morphology with brightened regions in the south-west. It exhibits an almost circular shape of D=33 x 31 pc (1 pc uncertainty in each direction) and radio spectral index of alpha=-0.68$+-$0.03 - typical for mid-age SNRs. We also report detection of polarised regions with a peak value of 17+-7% at 6 cm. An investigation of ROSAT images produced from merged PSPC data reveals the presence of extended X-ray emission coincident with the radio emission of the SNR. In X-rays, the brightest part is in the north-east. We discuss various scenarios in regards to the SNR-PSR association with emphasis on the large age difference, lack of a pulsar trail and no prominent point-like radio or X-ray source.
  • We present a new catalogue of radio-continuum sources in the field of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). This catalogue contains sources previously not found in 2370 MHz ({\lambda}=13 cm) with sources found at 1400 MHz ({\lambda}=20 cm) and 843 MHz ({\lambda}=36 cm). 45 sources have been detected at 13 cm, with 1560 sources at 20 cm created from new high sensitivity and resolution radio-continuum images of the SMC at 20 cm from Paper I . We also created a 36 cm catalogue to which we listed 1689 radio-continuum sources.
  • We report on new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) supernova remnant (SNR) J0550-6823 (DEM L328). This object is a typical horseshoe SNR with a diameter of 373" x 282" +- 4" (90 x 68 +- 1), making it one of the largest known SNRs in the Local Group. We estimate a relatively steep radio spectral index of alpha = -0.79 +- 0.27. However, its stronger than expected polarisation of 50% +- 10% is atypical for older and more evolved SNRs. We also note a strong correlation between [Oiii] and radio images, classifying this SNR as oxygen dominant.
  • We present and discuss new high-sensitivity and resolution radio-continuum images of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at lambda=20 cm (nu=1.4 GHz). The new images were created by merging 20-cm radiocontinuum archival data, from the Australian Telescope Compact Array and the Parkes radio-telescope. Our images span from ~10'' to ~150'' in resolution and sensitivity of r.m.s.>=0.5 mJy/beam. These images will be used in future studies of the SMC's intrinsic sources and its overall extended structure.
  • Aims: IKT 16 is an X-ray and radio-faint supernova remnant (SNR) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). A previous X-ray study of this SNR found a hard X-ray source near its centre. Using all available archival and proprietary XMM-Newton data, alongside new multi-frequency radio-continuum surveys and optical observations at H-alpha and forbidden [SII] and [OIII] lines, we aim to constrain the properties of the SNR and discover the nature of the hard source within. Methods: We combine XMM-Newton datasets to produce the highest quality X-ray image of IKT 16 to date. We use this, in combination with radio and optical images, to conduct a multi-wavelength morphological analysis of the remnant. We extract separate spectra from the SNR and the bright source near its centre, and conduct spectral fitting of both regions. Results: We find IKT 16 to have a radius of 37+-3 pc, with the bright source located 8+-2 pc from the centre. This is the largest known SNR in the SMC. The large size of the remnant suggests it is likely in the Sedov-adiabatic phase of evolution. Using a Sedov model to fit the SNR spectrum, we find an electron temperature kT of 1.03+-0.12 keV and an age of 14700 yr. The absorption found requires the remnant to be located deep within the SMC. The bright source is fit with a power law with index 1.58+-0.07, and is associated with diffuse radio emission extending towards the centre of the SNR. We argue that this source is likely to be the neutron star remnant of the supernova explosion, and infer its transverse kick velocity to be 580+-100 km/s. The X-ray and radio properties of this source strongly favour a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) origin.
  • We present a detailed study and results of new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of supernova remnant, SNR J0527-6549. This Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) ob ject follows a typical supernova remnant (SNR) horseshoe morphology with a diameter of D=(66x58)+-1 pc which is among the largest SNRs in the LMC. Its relatively large size indicates older age while a steeper than expected radio spectral index of aplha=-0.92+-0.11 is more typical for younger and energetic SNRs. Also, we report detections of regions with a high order of polarization at a peak value of ~54+-17% at 6 cm.
  • We report the extragalactic radio-continuum detection of 15 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) from recent Australia Telescope Compact Array+Parkes mosaic surveys. These detections were supplemented by new and high resolution radio, optical and IR observations which helped to resolve the true nature of the objects. Four of the PNe are located in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and 11 are located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Based on Galactic PNe the expected radio flux densities at the distance of the LMC/SMC are up to ~2.5 mJy and ~2.0 mJy at 1.4 GHz, respectively. We find that one of our new radio PNe in the SMC has a flux density of 5.1 mJy at 1.4 GHz, several times higher than expected. We suggest that the most luminous radio PN in the SMC (N S68) may represent the upper limit to radio peak luminosity because it is ~3 times more luminous than NGC 7027, the most luminous known Galactic PN. We note that the optical diameters of these 15 MCs PNe vary from very small (~0.08 pc or 0.32"; SMP L47) to very large (~1 pc or 4"; SMP L83). Their flux densities peak at different frequencies, suggesting that they may be in different stages of evolution. We briefly discuss mechanisms that may explain their unusually high radio-continuum flux densities. We argue that these detections may help solve the "missing mass problem" in PNe whose central stars were originally 1-8 Msun. We explore the possible link between ionised halos ejected by the central stars in their late evolution and extended radio emission. Because of their higher than expected flux densities we tentatively call this PNe (sub)sample - "Super PNe".
  • We present the 100 strongest 1.4 GHz point sources from a new mosaic image in the direction of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The observations making up the mosaic were made over a ten year period and were combined with Parkes single dish data at 1.4 GHz to complete the image for short spacing. An initial list of co-identifications within 10" at 0.843, 4.8 and 8.6 GHz consisted of 2682 sources. Elimination of extended objects and artifact noise allowed the creation of a refined list containing 1988 point sources. Most of these are presumed to be background objects seen through the LMC; a small portion may represent compact H II regions, young SNRs and radio planetary nebulae. For the 1988 point sources we find a preliminary average spectral index of -0.53 and present a 1.4 GHz image showing source location in the direction of the LMC.
  • We present preliminary results from spectral observations of four candidate radio sources co-identified with known planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). These were made using the Radcliffe 1.9-meter telescope in Sutherland, South Africa. These radio PNe were originally found in Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) surveys of the SMC at 1.42 and 2.37 GHz, and were further confirmed by new high resolution ATCA images at 6 and 3 cm (4"/2"). Optical PNe and radio candidates are within 2" and may represent a subpopulation of selected radio bright objects. Nebular ionized masses of these objects may be 2.6 MSol or greater, supporting the existence of PNe progenitor central stars with masses up to 8 MSol.