• We apply a formalism inspired by heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory with finite-range regularization to dynamical $2+1-$flavor CSSM/QCDSF/UKQCD Collaboration lattice QCD simulation results for the electric form factors of the octet baryons. The electric form factor of each octet baryon is extrapolated to the physical pseudoscalar masses, after finite-volume corrections have been applied, at six fixed values of $Q^2$ in the range 0.2-1.3 GeV$^2$. The extrapolated lattice results accurately reproduce the experimental form factors of the nucleon at the physical point, indicating that omitted disconnected quark loop contributions are small. Furthermore, using the results of a recent lattice study of the magnetic form factors, we determine the ratio $\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$. This quantity decreases with $Q^2$ in a way qualitatively consistent with recent experimental results.
  • We investigate implications of the use of the point-split axial vector current derived from a Wilson like fermionic action. We compute the corresponding renormalization factor nonperturbatively for one beta value. The axial charge gA calculated from this nonlocal current is found to be nearer to the physical value than computed with the local axial vector current -- computed both on the same lattice with the same action.
  • We present results on the pseudoscalar meson masses from a fully dynamical simulation of QCD+QED. We concentrate particularly on violations of isospin symmetry. We calculate the $\pi^+$-$\pi^0$ splitting and also look at other isospin violating mass differences. We have presented results for these isospin splittings in arXiv:1508.06401 [hep-lat]. In this paper we give more details of the techniques employed, discussing in particular the question of how much of the symmetry violation is due to QCD, arising from the different masses of the $u$ and $d$ quarks, and how much is due to QED, arising from the different charges of the quarks. This decomposition is not unique, it depends on the renormalisation scheme and scale. We suggest a renormalisation scheme in which Dashen's theorem for neutral mesons holds, so that the electromagnetic self-energies of the neutral mesons are zero, and discuss how the self-energies change when we transform to a scheme such as $\bar{MS}$, in which Dashen's theorem for neutral mesons is violated.
  • The Feynman-Hellmann (FH) relation offers an alternative way of accessing hadronic matrix elements through artificial modifications to the QCD Lagrangian. In particular, a FH-motivated method provides a new approach to calculations of disconnected contributions to matrix elements and high-momentum nucleon and pion form factors. Here we present results for the total nucleon axial charge, including a statistically significant non-negative total disconnected quark contribution of around $-5\%$ at an unphysically heavy pion mass. Extending the FH relation to finite-momentum transfers, we also present calculations of the pion and nucleon electromagnetic form factors up to momentum transfers of around 7-8 GeV$^2$. Results for the nucleon are not able to confirm the existence of a sign change for the ratio $\frac{G_E}{G_M}$, but suggest that future calculations at lighter pion masses will provide fascinating insight into this behaviour at large momentum transfers.
  • For Wilson and clover fermions traditional formulations of the axial vector current do not respect the continuum Ward identity which relates the divergence of that current to the pseudoscalar density. Here we propose to use a point-split or one-link axial vector current whose divergence exactly satisfies a lattice Ward identity, involving the pseudoscalar density and a number of irrelevant operators. We check in one-loop lattice perturbation theory with SLiNC fermion and gauge plaquette action that this is indeed the case including order $O(a)$ effects. Including these operators the axial Ward identity remains renormalisation invariant. First preliminary results of a nonperturbative check of the Ward identity are also presented.
  • The spin decomposition of the proton is a long-standing topic of much interest in hadronic physics. Lattice QCD has had much success in calculating the connected contributions to the quark spin. However, complete calculations, which necessarily involve gluonic and strange-quark contributions, still present some challenges. These "disconnected" contributions typically involve small signals hidden against large statistical backgrounds and rely on computationally intensive stochastic techniques. In this work we demonstrate how a Feynman-Hellmann approach may be used to calculate such quantities, by measuring shifts in the proton energy arising from artificial modifications to the QCD action. We find a statistically significant non-zero result for the disconnected quark spin contribution to the proton of about -5% at a pion mass of 470 MeV.
  • We compute the electric dipole moment d_n of the neutron from a fully dynamical simulation of lattice QCD with 2+1 flavors of clover fermions and nonvanishing theta term. The latter is rotated into the pseudoscalar density in the fermionic action using the axial anomaly. To make the action real, the vacuum angle theta is taken to be purely imaginary. The physical value of d_n is obtained by analytic continuation. We find d_n = -3.8(2)(9) x 10^{-16} [theta e cm], which, when combined with the experimental limit on d_n, leads to the upper bound theta < 7.6 x 10^{-11}.
  • Experimental tests of QCD through its predictions for the strange-quark content of the proton have been drastically restricted by our lack of knowledge of the violation of charge symmetry (CSV). We find unexpectedly tiny CSV in the proton's electromagnetic form factors by performing the first extraction of these quantities based on an analysis of lattice QCD data. The resulting values are an order of magnitude smaller than current bounds on proton strangeness from parity violating electron-proton scattering experiments. This result paves the way for a new generation of experimental measurements of the proton's strange form factors to challenge the predictions of QCD.
  • A novel method for nonperturbative renormalization of lattice operators is introduced, which lends itself to the calculation of renormalization factors for nonsinglet as well as singlet operators. The method is based on the Feynman-Hellmann relation, and involves computing two-point correlators in the presence of generalized background fields arising from introducing additional operators into the action. As a first application, and test of the method, we compute the renormalization factors of the axial vector current $A_\mu$ and the scalar density $S$ for both nonsinglet and singlet operators for $N_f=3$ flavors of SLiNC fermions. For nonsinglet operators, where a meaningful comparison is possible, perfect agreement with recent calculations using standard three-point function techniques is found.
  • We perform a Nf = 2 + 1 lattice QCD simulation to determine the quark spin fractions of hadrons using the Feynman-Hellmann theorem. By introducing an external spin operator to the fermion action, the matrix elements relevant for quark spin fractions are extracted from the linear response of the hadron energies. Simulations indicate that the Feynman-Hellmann method offers statistical precision that is comparable to the standard three-point function approach, with the added benefit that it is less susceptible to excited state contamination. This suggests that the Feynman-Hellmann technique offers a promising alternative for calculations of quark line disconnected contributions to hadronic matrix elements. At the SU(3)-flavour symmetry point, we find that the connected quark spin fractions are universally in the range 55-70% for vector mesons and octet and decuplet baryons. There is an indication that the amount of spin suppression is quite sensitive to the strength of SU(3) breaking.
  • We present physical results for a variety of light hadronic quantities obtained via a combined analysis of three 2+1 flavour domain wall fermion ensemble sets. For two of our ensemble sets we used the Iwasaki gauge action with beta=2.13 (a^-1=1.75(4) GeV) and beta=2.25 (a^-1=2.31(4) GeV) and lattice sizes of 24^3 x 64 and 32^3 x 64 respectively, with unitary pion masses in the range 293(5)-417(10) MeV. The extent L_s for the 5^th dimension of the domain wall fermion formulation is L_s=16 in these ensembles. In this analysis we include a third ensemble set that makes use of the novel Iwasaki+DSDR (Dislocation Suppressing Determinant Ratio) gauge action at beta = 1.75 (a^-1=1.37(1) GeV) with a lattice size of 32^3 x 64 and L_s=32 to reach down to partially-quenched pion masses as low as 143(1) MeV and a unitary pion mass of 171(1) MeV, while retaining good chiral symmetry and topological tunneling. We demonstrate a significant improvement in our control over the chiral extrapolation, resulting in much improved continuum predictions for the above quantities. The main results of this analysis include the pion and kaon decay constants, f_\pi=127(3)_{stat}(3)_{sys} MeV and f_K = 152(3)_{stat}(2)_{sys} MeV respectively (f_K/f_\pi = 1.199(12)_{stat}(14)_{sys}); the average up/down quark mass and the strange-quark mass in the MSbar-scheme at 3 GeV, m_{ud}(MSbar, 3 GeV) = 3.05(8)_{stat}(6)_{sys} MeV and m_s(MSbar, 3 GeV) = 83.5(1.7)_{stat}(1.1)_{sys}; the neutral kaon mixing parameter in the MSbar-scheme at 3 GeV, B_K(MSbar,3 GeV) = 0.535(8)_{stat}(13)_{sys}, and in the RGI scheme, \hat B_K = 0.758(11)_{stat}(19)_{sys}; and the Sommer scales r_1 = 0.323(8)_{stat}(4)_{sys} fm and r_0 = 0.480(10)_{stat}(4)_{sys} (r_1/r_0 = 0.673(11)_{stat}(3)_{sys}). We also obtain values for the SU(2) ChPT effective couplings, \bar{l_3} = 2.91(23)_{stat}(7)_{sys}$ and \bar{l_4} = 3.99(16)_{stat}(9)_{sys}.
  • Using an SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion in the quark mass, we determine the QCD component of the neutron-proton, Sigma and Xi mass splittings of the baryon octet due to up-down (and strange) quark mass differences. Provided the average quark mass is kept constant, the expansion coefficients in our procedure can be determined from computationally cheaper simulations with mass degenerate sea quarks and partially quenched valence quarks. Full details and numerical results are given in ref 1.
  • Using an SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion in the quark mass, we determine the QCD component of the nucleon, Sigma and Xi mass splittings of the baryon octet due to up-down (and strange) quark mass differences in terms of the kaon mass splitting. Provided the average quark mass is kept constant, the expansion coefficients in our procedure can be determined from computationally cheaper simulations with mass degenerate sea quarks and partially quenched valence quarks. Both the linear and quadratic terms in the SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion are considered; it is found that the quadratic terms only change the result by a few percent, indicating that the expansion is highly convergent.
  • We investigate the perturbative and nonperturbative renormalization of composite operators in lattice QCD restricting ourselves to operators that are bilinear in the quark fields (quark-antiquark operators). These include operators which are relevant to the calculation of moments of hadronic structure functions. The nonperturbative computations are based on Monte Carlo simulations with two flavors of clover fermions and utilize the Rome-Southampton method also known as the RI-MOM scheme. We compare the results of this approach with various estimates from lattice perturbation theory, in particular with recent two-loop calculations.
  • A proposal by L\"uscher enables one to compute the scattering phases of elastic two-body systems from the energy levels of the lattice Hamiltonian in a finite volume. In this work we generalize the formalism to S--, P-- and D--wave meson and baryon resonances, and general total momenta. Employing nonvanishing momenta has several advantages, among them making a wider range of energy levels accessible on a single lattice volume and shifting the level crossing to smaller values of $m_\pi L$.
  • By introducing an additional operator into the action and using the Feynman-Hellmann theorem we describe a method to determine both the quark line connected and disconnected terms of matrix elements. As an illustration of the method we calculate the gluon contribution (chromo-electric and chromo-magnetic components) to the nucleon mass.
  • It is shown that the strong volume-dependence of the axial charge of the nucleon seen in lattice QCD calculations can be understood quantitatively in terms of the pion-induced interactions between neighbouring nucleons. The associated wave function renormalization leads to an increased suppression of the axial charge as the strength of the interaction increases, either because of a decrease in lattice size or in pion mass.
  • We present the first determination of charge symmetry violation (CSV) in the spin-dependent parton distribution functions of the nucleon. This is done by determining the first two Mellin moments of the spin-dependent parton distribution functions of the octet baryons from N_f = 2 + 1 lattice simulations. The results are compared with predictions from quark models of nucleon structure. We discuss the contribution of partonic spin CSV to the Bjorken sum rule, which is important because the CSV contributions represent the only partonic corrections to the Bjorken sum rule.
  • QCD lattice simulations yield hadron masses as functions of the quark masses. From the gradients of the hadron masses the sigma terms can then be determined. We consider here dynamical 2+1 flavour simulations, in which we start from a point of the flavour symmetric line and then keep the singlet or average quark mass fixed as we approach the physical point. This leads to highly constrained fits for hadron masses in a multiplet. The gradient of this path for a hadron mass then gives a relation between the light and strange sigma terms. A further relation can be found from the change in the singlet quark mass along the flavour symmetric line. This enables light and strange sigma terms to be estimated for the baryon octet.
  • The calculation of baryon wave functions at small inter-quark separations is an ongoing effort within the QCDSF collaboration. In this update on normalization constants and distribution amplitudes of the nucleon and its negative parity partner, N* (1535), we present new lattice data which helps us controlling finite size effects. We use new chiral perturbation theory results to perform the extrapolation to the physical point.
  • We determine the quark contributions to the nucleon spin Delta s, Delta u and Delta d as well as their contributions to the nucleon mass, the sigma-terms. This is done by computing both, the quark line connected and disconnected contributions to the respective matrix elements, using the non-perturbatively improved Sheikholeslami-Wohlert Wilson Fermionic action. We simulate n_F=2 mass degenerate sea quarks with a pion mass of about 285 MeV and a lattice spacing a = 0.073 fm. The renormalization of the matrix elements involves mixing between contributions from different quark flavours. The pion-nucleon sigma-term is extrapolated to physical quark masses exploiting the sea quark mass dependence of the nucleon mass. We obtain the renormalized value sigma_{piN}=38(12) MeV at the physical point and the strangeness fraction f_{Ts}=sigma_s/m_N=0.012(14)(+10-3) at our larger than physical sea quark mass. For the strangeness contribution to the nucleon spin we obtain in the MSbar scheme at the renormalization scale of 2.71 GeV Delta s = -0.020(10)(2).
  • We calculate the disconnected contribution to the form factor for the semileptonic decay of a D-meson into a final state, containing a flavor singlet eta meson. We use QCDSF n_f=2+1 configurations at the flavor symmetric point m_u=m_d=m_s and the partially quenched approximation for the relativistic charm quark. Several acceleration and noise reduction techniques for the stochastic estimation of the disconnected loop are tested.
  • QCD lattice simulations with 2+1 flavours (when two quark flavours are mass degenerate) typically start at rather large up-down and strange quark masses and extrapolate first the strange quark mass and then the up-down quark mass to its respective physical value. Here we discuss an alternative method of tuning the quark masses, in which the singlet quark mass is kept fixed. Using group theory the possible quark mass polynomials for a Taylor expansion about the flavour symmetric line are found, first for the general 1+1+1 flavour case and then for the 2+1 flavour case. This ensures that the kaon always has mass less than the physical kaon mass. This method of tuning quark masses then enables highly constrained polynomial fits to be used in the extrapolation of hadron masses to their physical values. Numerical results for the 2+1 flavour case confirm the usefulness of this expansion and an extrapolation to the physical pion mass gives hadron mass values to within a few percent of their experimental values. Singlet quantities remain constant which allows the lattice spacing to be determined from hadron masses (without necessarily being at the physical point). Furthermore an extension of this programme to include partially quenched results is given.
  • We report on recent results of the QCDSF/UKQCD Collaboration on investigations of baryon structure using configurations generated with N_f=2+1 dynamical flavours of O(a) improved Wilson fermions. With the strange quark mass as an additional dynamical degree of freedom in our simulations we avoid the need for a partially quenched approximation when investigating the properties of particles containing a strange quark, e.g. the hyperons. In particular, we will focus on the nucleon and hyperon axial charges and quark momentum fractions.
  • The QCDSF collaboration has investigated the distribution amplitudes and wavefunction normalization constants of the nucleon and its parity partner, the $N^* (1535)$. We report on recent progress in the calculation of these quantities on configurations with two dynamical flavors of $\mathcal{O}(a)$-improved Wilson fermions. New data at pion masses of approximately 270 MeV helps in significantly reducing errors in the extrapolation to the physical point.