• Atomically thin ferromagnetic and conducting electron systems are highly desired for spintronics, because they can be controlled with both magnetic and electric fields. We present (SrRuO3)1-(SrTiO3)5 superlattices and single-unit-cell-thick SrRuO3 samples that are capped with SrTiO3. We achieve samples of exceptional quality. In these samples, the electron systems comprise only a single RuO2 plane. We observe conductivity down to 50 mK, a ferromagnetic state with a Curie temperature of 25 K, and signals of magnetism persisting up to approximately 100 K.
  • Two-dimensional electron systems with fascinating properties exist in multilayers of standard semiconductors, on helium surfaces, and in oxides. Compared to the two-dimensional (2D) electron gases of semiconductors, the 2D electron systems in oxides are typically more strongly correlated and more sensitive to the microscopic structure of the hosting lattice. This sensitivity suggests that the oxide 2D systems are highly tunable by hydrostatic pressure. Here we explore the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the well-characterized 2D electron system formed at LaAlO$_{3}$ -SrTiO$_{3}$ interfaces[1] and measure a pronounced, unexpected response. Pressure of $\sim$2 GPa reversibly doubles the 2D carrier density $n_{s}$ at 4 K. Along with the increase of $n_{s}$, the conductivity and mobility are reduced under pressure. First-principles pressure simulations reveal the same behavior of the carrier density and suggest a possible mechanism of the mobility reduction, based on the dielectric properties of both materials and their variation under external pressure.
  • A superconducting phase with an extremely low carrier density of the order of 10^13 cm^-2 is present at LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interfaces. If depleted from charge carriers by means of a gate field, this superconducting phase undergoes a transition into a metallic/insulating state that is still characterized by a gap in the spectral density of states. Measuring and analyzing the critical field of this gap, we provide evidence that macroscopically phase-coherent Cooper pairs are present in the metallic/insulating state. This is characterized by fluctuating vortex-antivortex pairs, and not by individual, immobile Cooper pairs. The measurements furthermore yield the carrier-density dependence of the superconducting coherence length of the two-dimensional system.
  • The possible existence of short-channel effects in oxide field-effect transistors is investigated by exploring field-effect transistors with various gate lengths fabricated from LaAlO$_3$-SrTiO$_3$ heterostructures. The studies reveal the existence of channel-length modulation and drain-induced barrier lowering for gate lengths below 1 {\mu}m, with a characteristic behavior comparable to semiconducting devices. With the fabrication of field-effect transistors with gate lengths as small as 60 nm the results demonstrate the possibility to fabricate by electron-beam lithography functional devices based on complex oxides with characteristic lengths of several ten nanometers.
  • The emergence of magnetism in otherwise nonmagnetic compounds and its underlying mechanisms have become the subject of intense research. Here we demonstrate that the nonmagnetic oxygen vacancies are responsible for an unconventional magnetic state common for titanate interfaces and surfaces. Using an effective multiorbital modelling, we find that the presence of localized vacancies leads to an interplay of ferromagnetic order in the itinerant t2g band and complex magnetic oscillations in the orbitally-reconstructed eg-band, which can be tuned by gate fields at oxide interfaces. The magnetic phase diagram includes highly fragmented regions of stable and phase-separated magnetic states forming beyond nonzero critical defect concentrations.
  • The interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 hosts a two-dimensional electron system of itinerant carriers, although both oxides are band insulators. Interface ferromagnetism coexisting with superconductivity has been found and attributed to local moments. Experimentally, it has been established that Ti 3d electrons are confined to the interface. Using soft x-ray angle-resolved resonant photoelectron spectroscopy we have directly mapped the interface states in k-space. Our data demonstrate a charge dichotomy. A mobile fraction contributes to Fermi surface sheets, whereas a localized portion at higher binding energies is tentatively attributed to electrons trapped by O-vacancies in the SrTiO3. While photovoltage effects in the polar LaAlO3 layers cannot be excluded, the apparent absence of surface-related Fermi surface sheets could also be fully reconciled in a recently proposed electronic reconstruction picture where the built-in potential in the LaAlO3 is compensated by surface O-vacancies serving also as charge reservoir.
  • Emergent phenomena, including superconductivity and magnetism, found in the two-dimensional electron liquid (2-DEL) at the interface between the insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 distinguish this rich system from conventional two-dimensional electron gases at compound semiconductor interfaces. The origin of this 2-DEL, however, is highly debated with focus on the role of defects in the SrTiO3 while the LaAlO3 has been assumed perfect. Our experiments and first principles calculations show that the cation stoichiometry of the nominal LaAlO3 layer is key to 2-DEL formation: only Al-rich LaAlO3 results in a 2-DEL. While extrinsic defects including oxygen deficiency are known to render LaAlO3/SrTiO3 samples conducting, our results show that in the absence of such extrinsic defects, an interface 2-DEL can form. Its origin is consistent with an intrinsic electronic reconstruction occurring to counteract a polarization catastrophe. This work provides a roadmap for identifying other interfaces where emergent behaviors await discovery.
  • Electric power may, in principle, be generated in a highly efficient manner from heat created by focused solar irradiation, chemical combustion, or nuclear decay by means of thermionic energy conversion. As the conversion efficiency of the thermionic process tends to be degraded by electron space charges, the efficiencies of thermionic generators have amounted to only a fraction of those fundamentally possible. We show that this space-charge problem can be resolved by shaping the electric potential distribution of the converter such that the static electron space-charge clouds are transformed into an output current. Although the technical development of practical generators will require further substantial efforts, we conclude that a highly efficient transformation of heat to electric power may well be achieved.
  • With infrared ellipsometry, x-ray diffraction, and electric transport measurements we investigated the electric-field-effect on the confined electrons at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. We obtained evidence that the localization of the electrons at low temperature and negative gate voltage is induced, or at least strongly enhanced, by a pyroelectric phase transition in SrTiO3 which strongly reduces the lattice polarizability and the subsequent Coulomb screening. In particular, we show that the charge localisation and the polar order of SrTiO3 both develop below about 50 K and exhibit similar, unipolar hysteresis loops as a function of the gate voltage. Our findings suggest that the pyroelectric order also plays an important role in the quantum phase transition at very low temperatures where superconductivity is suppressed by an electric field.
  • We show that oxygen vacancies at titanate interfaces induce a complex multiorbital reconstruction which involves a lowering of the local symmetry and an inversion of t2g and eg orbitals resulting in the occupation of the eg orbitals of Ti atoms neighboring the O vacancy. The orbital reconstruction depends strongly on the clustering of O vacancies and can be accompanied by a magnetic splitting between the local eg orbitals with lobes directed towards the vacancy and interface dxy orbitals. The reconstruction generates a two-dimensional interface magnetic state not observed in bulk SrTiO3. Using generalized gradient approximation (LSDA) with intra-atomic Coulomb repulsion (GGA+U), we find that this magnetic state is common for titanate surfaces and interfaces.
  • A two-dimensional electron liquid is formed at the n-type interface between SrTiO3 and LaAlO3. Here we report on Kelvin probe microscopy measurements of the electronic compressibility of this electron system. The electronic compressibility is found to be negative for carrier densities of \approx10^13/cm^2. At even smaller densities, a metal-to-insulator transition occurs. These local measurements corroborate earlier measurements of the electronic compressibility of LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interfaces obtained by measuring the capacitance of macroscopic metal-LaAlO3-SrTiO3 capacitors.
  • Using LaAlO$_3$-SrTiO$_3$ bilayers, we have fabricated field-effect devices that utilize the two-dimensional electron liquid generated at the bilayers' {\textit n}-type interfaces as drain-source channels and the LaAlO$_3$ layers as gate dielectrics. With gate voltages well below 1\,V, the devices are characterized by voltage gain and current gain. The devices were operated at temperatures up to 100\,{\deg}C.
  • Ferromagnetism and superconductivity are in most cases adverse. However, recent experiments reveal that they coexist at interfaces of LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. We analyze the magnetic state within density functional theory and provide evidence that magnetism is not an intrinsic property of the two-dimensional electron liquid at the interface. We demonstrate that the robust ferromagnetic state is induced by the oxygen vacancies in SrTiO3- or in the LaAlO3-layer. This allows for the notion that areas with increased density of oxygen vacancies produce ferromagnetic puddles and account for the previous observation of a superparamagnetic behavior in the superconducting state.
  • A two dimensional electronic system with novel electronic properties forms at the interface between the insulators LaAlO$_3$ and SrTiO$_3$. Samples fabricated until now have been found to be either magnetic or superconducting, depending on growth conditions. We combine transport measurements with high-resolution magnetic torque magnetometry and report here evidence of magnetic ordering of the two-dimensional electron liquid at the interface. The magnetic ordering exists from well below the superconducting transition to up to 200 K, and is characterized by an in-plane magnetic moment. Our results suggest that there is either phase separation or coexistence between magnetic and superconducting states. The coexistence scenario would point to an unconventional superconducting phase in the ground state.
  • The evolution of the atomic structure of LaAlO3 grown on SrTiO3 was investigated using surface x-ray diffraction in conjunction with model-independent, phase-retrieval algorithms between two and five monolayers film thickness. A depolarizing buckling is observed between cation and oxygen positions in response to the electric field of polar LaAlO3, which decreases with increasing film thickness. We explain this in terms of competition between elastic strain energy, electrostatic energy, and electronic reconstructions. The findings are qualitatively reproduced by density-functional theory calculations. Significant cationic intermixing across the interface extends approximately three monolayers for all film thicknesses. The interfaces of films thinner than four monolayers therefore extend to the surface, which might affect conductivity.
  • We report on a metal-insulator transition in the LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface electron system, of which the carrier density is tuned by an electric gate field. Below a critical carrier density n_c ranging from 0.5-1.5 * 10^13/cm^2, LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interfaces, forming drain-source channels in field-effect devices are non-ohmic. The differential resistance at zero channel bias diverges within a 2% variation of the carrier density. Above n_c, the conductivity of the ohmic channels has a metal-like temperature dependence, while below n_c conductivity sets in only above a threshold electric field. For a given thickness of the LaAlO3 layer, the conductivity follows a sigma_0 ~(n - n_c)/n_c characteristic. The metal-insulator transition is found to be distinct from that of the semiconductor 2D systems.
  • Novel electronic systems forming at oxide interfaces comprise a class of new materials with a wide array of potential applications. A high mobility electron system forms at the LaAlO$_3$/SrTiO$_3$ interface and, strikingly, both superconducts and displays indications of hysteretic magnetoresistance. An essential step for device applications is establishing the ability to vary the electronic conductivity of the electron system by means of a gate. We have fabricated metallic top gates above a conductive interface to vary the electron density at the interface. By monitoring capacitance and electric field penetration, we are able to tune the charge carrier density and establish that we can completely deplete the metallic interface with small voltages. Moreover, at low carrier densities, the capacitance is significantly enhanced beyond the geometric capacitance for the structure. In the same low density region, the metallic interface overscreens an external electric field. We attribute these observations to a negative compressibility of the electronic system at the interface. Similar phenomena have been observed previously in semiconducting two-dimensional electronic systems. The observed compressibility result is consistent with the interface containing a system of mobile electrons in two dimensions.
  • Using the metal-insulator transition that takes place as a function of carrier density at the LaAlO$_3$-SrTiO$_3$ interface, oxide diodes have been fabricated with room-temperature breakdown voltages of up to 200 V. With applied voltage, the capacitance of the diodes changes by a factor of 150. The diodes are robust and operate at temperatures up to 270 C.
  • Using tunneling spectroscopy we have measured the spectral density of states of the mobile, two-dimensional electron system generated at the LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface. As shown by the density of states the interface electron system differs qualitatively, first, from the electron systems of the materials defining the interface and, second, from the two-dimensional electron gases formed at interfaces between conventional semiconductors.
  • The interface properties of high-temperature cuprate superconductors have been of interest for many years, and play an essential role in Josephson junctions, superconducting cables, and microwave electronics. In particular, the maximum critical current achievable in high-Tc wires and tapes is well known to be limited by the presence of grain boundaries, regions of mismatch between crystallites with misoriented crystalline axes. In studies of single, artificially fabricated grain boundaries the striking observation has been made that the critical current Jc of a grain boundary junction depends exponentially on the misorientation angle. Until now microscopic understanding of this apparently universal behavior has been lacking. We present here the results of a microscopic evaluation based on a construction of fully 3D YBCO grain boundaries by molecular dynamics. With these structures, we calculate an effective tight-binding Hamiltonian for the d-wave superconductor with a grain boundary. The critical current is then shown to follow an exponential suppression with grain boundary angle. We identify the buildup of charge inhomogeneities as the dominant mechanism for the suppression of the supercurrent.
  • With infrared ellipsometry and transport measurements we investigated the electrons at the interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. We obtained a sheet carrier density of Ns~5-9x 10E13 cm^-2, an effective mass of m*~3m_e, and a strongly frequency dependent mobility. The latter are similar as in bulk SrTi1-xNbxO3 and therefore suggestive of polaronic correlations of the confined carriers. We also determined the vertical density profile which has a strongly asymmetric shape with a rapid initial decay over the first 2 nm and a pronounced tail that extends to about 11 nm.
  • The so-called "polar catastrophe", a sudden electronic reconstruction taking place to compensate for the interfacial ionic polar discontinuity, is currently considered as a likely factor to explain the surprising conductivity of the interface between the insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. We applied optical second harmonic generation, a technique that a priori can detect both mobile and localized interfacial electrons, to investigating the electronic polar reconstructions taking place at the interface. As the LaAlO3 film thickness is increased, we identify two abrupt electronic rearrangements: the first takes place at a thickness of 3 unit cells, in the insulating state; the second occurs at a thickness of 4-6 unit cells, i.e., just above the threshold for which the samples become conducting. Two possible physical scenarios behind these observations are proposed. The first is based on an electronic transfer into localized electronic states at the interface that acts as a precursor of the conductivity onset. In the second scenario, the signal variations are attributed to the strong ionic relaxations taking place in the LaAlO3 layer.
  • The conducting interface of LaAlO$_3$/SrTiO$_3$ heterostructures has been studied by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. From the Ti~2$p$ signal and its angle-dependence we derive that the thickness of the electron gas is much smaller than the probing depth of 4 nm and that the carrier densities vary with increasing number of LaAlO$_3$ overlayers. Our results point to an electronic reconstruction in the LaAlO$_3$ overlayer as the driving mechanism for the conducting interface and corroborate the recent interpretation of the superconducting ground state as being of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless type.
  • Conventional two-dimensional electron gases are realized by engineering the interfaces between semiconducting compounds. In 2004, Ohtomo and Hwang discovered that an electron gas can be also realized at the interface between large gap insulators made of transition metal oxides [1]. This finding has generated considerable efforts to clarify the underlying microscopic mechanism. Of particular interest is the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 system, because it features especially striking properties. High carrier mobility [1], electric field tuneable superconductivity [2] and magnetic effects [3], have been found. Here we show that an orbital reconstruction is underlying the generation of the electron gas at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 n-type interface. Our results are based on extensive investigations of the electronic properties and of the orbital structure of the interface using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. In particular we find that the degeneracy of the Ti 3d states is fully removed, and that the Ti 3dxy levels become the first available states for conducting electrons.
  • Interfaces between complex oxides are emerging as one of the most interesting playgrounds in condensed matter physics. In this special setting, in which translational symmetry is artificially broken, a variety of novel electronic phases can be promoted. Theoretical studies predict complex phase diagrams and suggest the key role of the carrier density in determining the systems ground states. A particularly fascinating system is the interface between the insulators LaAlO$_{3}$ and SrTiO$_{3}$, which displays conductivity with high mobility. Recently two possible ground states have been experimentally identified: a magnetic state and a two dimensional (2D) superconducting condensate. In this Letter we use the electric field effect to explore the phase diagram of the system. The electrostatic tuning of the carrier density allows an on/off switching of superconductivity and drives a quantum phase transition (QPT) between a 2D superconducting state and an insulating state (2D-QSI). Analyses of the magnetotransport properties in the insulating state are consistent with weak localisation and do not provide evidence for magnetism. The electric field control of superconductivity demonstrated here opens the way to the development of novel mesoscopic superconducting circuits