• (Abr.) Laser guide stars employed at astronomical observatories provide artificial wavefront reference sources to help correct (in part) the impact of atmospheric turbulence on astrophysical observations. Following the recent commissioning of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) on UT4 at the VLT, we characterize the spectral signature of the uplink beams from the 22W lasers to assess the impact of laser scattering from the 4LGSF on science observations. We use the MUSE optical integral field spectrograph to acquire spectra at a resolution of R~3000 of the uplink laser beams over the wavelength range of 4750\AA\ to 9350\AA. We report the first detection of laser-induced Raman scattering by N2, O2, CO2, H2O and (tentatively) CH4 molecules in the atmosphere above the astronomical observatory of Cerro Paranal. In particular, our observations reveal the characteristic spectral signature of laser photons -- but 480\AA\ to 2210\AA\ redder than the original laser wavelength of 5889.959\AA\ -- landing on the 8.2m primary mirror of UT4 after being Raman-scattered on their way up to the sodium layer. Laser-induced Raman scattering is not unique to the observatory of Cerro Paranal, but common to any astronomical telescope employing a laser-guide-star (LGS) system. It is thus essential for any optical spectrograph coupled to a LGS system to handle thoroughly the possibility of a Raman spectral contamination via a proper baffling of the instrument and suitable calibrations procedures. These considerations are particularly applicable for the HARMONI optical spectrograph on the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope. At sites hosting multiple telescopes, laser collision prediction tools also ought to account for the presence of Raman emission from the uplink laser beam(s) to avoid the unintentional contamination of observations acquired with telescopes in the vicinity of a LGS system.
  • SPHERE is the high-contrast exoplanet imager and spectrograph installed at the Unit Telescope 3 of the Very Large Telescope. After more than two years of regular operations, we analyse statistically the performance of the adaptive optics system and its dependence on the atmospheric conditions above the Paranal observatory, as measured by the suite of dedicated instruments which are part of the Astronomical Site Monitor and as estimated by the SPHERE real-time calculator. We also explain how this information can be used to schedule the observations in order to yield the best data quality and to guide the astronomer when processing his/her data.
  • The major source of noise in high-contrast imaging is the presence of slowly evolving speckles that do not average with time. The temporal stability of the point-spread-function (PSF) is therefore critical to reach a high contrast with extreme adaptive optics (xAO) instruments. Understanding on which timescales the PSF evolves and what are the critical parameters driving the speckle variability allow to design an optimal observing strategy and data reduction technique to calibrate instrumental aberrations and reveal faint astrophysical sources. We have obtained a series of 52 min, AO-corrected, coronagraphically occulted, high-cadence (1.6Hz), H-band images of the star HR 3484 with the SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimeter High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch instrument on the VLT. This is a unique data set from an xAO instrument to study its stability on timescales as short as one second and as long as several tens of minutes. We find different temporal regimes of decorrelation. We show that residuals from the atmospheric turbulence induce a fast, partial decorrelation of the PSF over a few seconds, before a transition to a regime with a linear decorrelation with time, at a rate of several tens parts per million per second (ppm/s). We analyze the spatial dependence of this decorrelation, within the well-corrected radius of the adaptive optics system and show that the linear decorrelation is faster at short separations. Last, we investigate the influence of the distance to the meridian on the decorrelation.
  • In the present study we aim to investigate the circumstellar environment of the spectroscopic binary T Tauri star CS Cha. From unresolved mid- to far-infrared photometry it is predicted that CS Cha hosts a disk with a large cavity. In addition, SED modeling suggests significant dust settling, pointing towards an evolved disk that may show signs of ongoing or completed planet formation. We observed CS Cha with the high contrast imager VLT/SPHERE in polarimetric differential imaging mode to resolve the circumbinary disk in near infrared scattered light. These observations were followed-up by VLT/NACO L-band observations and complemented by archival VLT/NACO K-band and HST/WFPC2 I-band data. We resolve the compact circumbinary disk around CS Cha for the first time in scattered light. We find a smooth, low inclination disk with an outer radius of $\sim$55 au (at 165 pc). We do not detect the inner cavity but find an upper limit for the cavity size of $\sim$15 au. Furthermore, we find a faint co-moving companion with a projected separation of 210 au from the central binary outside of the circumbinary disk. The companion is detected in polarized light and shows an extreme degree of polarization (13.7$\pm$0.4 \% in J-band). The companion's J- and H-band magnitudes are compatible with masses of a few M$_\mathrm{Jup}$. However, K-, L- and I-band data draw this conclusion into question. We explore with radiative transfer modeling whether an unresolved circum-companion disk can be responsible for the high polarization and complex photometry. We find that the set of observations is best explained by a heavily extincted low mass ($\sim 20 \mathrm{M}_\mathrm{Jup}$) brown dwarf or high mass planet with an unresolved disk and dust envelope.
  • Debris disks are the intrinsic by-products of the star and planet formation processes. Most likely due to instrumental limitations and their natural faintness, little is known about debris disks around low-mass stars, especially when it comes to spatially resolved observations. We present new VLT/SPHERE IRDIS Dual-Polarization Imaging (DPI) observations in which we detect the dust ring around the M2 spectral type star TWA\,7. Combined with additional Angular Differential Imaging observations we aim at a fine characterization of the debris disk and setting constraints on the presence of low-mass planets. We model the SPHERE DPI observations and constrain the location of the small dust grains, as well as the spectral energy distribution of the debris disk, using the results inferred from the observations, and perform simple N-body simulations. We find that the dust density distribution peaks at 25 au, with a very shallow outer power-law slope, and that the disk has an inclination of 13 degrees with a position angle of 90 degrees East of North. We also report low signal-to-noise detections of an outer belt at a distance of ~52 au from the star, of a spiral arm in the Southern side of the star, and of a possible dusty clump at 3.9 au. These findings seem to persist over timescales of at least a year. Using the intensity images, we do not detect any planets in the close vicinity of the star, but the sensitivity reaches Jovian planet mass upper limits. We find that the SED is best reproduced with an inner disk at 7 au and another belt at 25 au. We report the detections of several unexpected features in the disk around TWA\,7. A yet undetected 100 M$_\oplus$ planet with a semi-major axis at 20-30 au could possibly explain the outer belt as well as the spiral arm. We conclude that stellar winds are unlikely to be responsible for the spiral arm.
  • The nearby and young M star AU Mic is surrounded by a debris disk in which we previously identified a series of large-scale arch-like structures that have never been seen before in any other debris disk and that move outward at high velocities. We initiated a monitoring program with the following objectives: 1) track the location of the structures and better constrain their projected speeds, 2) search for new features emerging closer in, and ultimately 3) understand the mechanism responsible for the motion and production of the disk features. AU Mic was observed at 11 different epochs between August 2014 and October 2017 with the IR camera and spectrograph of SPHERE. These high-contrast imaging data were processed with a variety of angular, spectral, and polarimetric differential imaging techniques to reveal the faintest structures in the disk. We measured the projected separations of the features in a systematic way for all epochs. We also applied the very same measurements to older observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with the visible cameras STIS and ACS. The main outcomes of this work are 1) the recovery of the five southeastern broad arch-like structures we identified in our first study, and confirmation of their fast motion (projected speed in the range 4-12 km/s); 2) the confirmation that the very first structures observed in 2004 with ACS are indeed connected to those observed later with STIS and now SPHERE; 3) the discovery of two new very compact structures at the northwest side of the disk (at 0.40" and 0.55" in May 2015) that move to the southeast at low speed; and 4) the identification of a new arch-like structure that might be emerging at the southeast side at about 0.4" from the star (as of May 2016). Abridged.
  • HD95086 (A8V, 17Myr) hosts a rare planetary system for which a multi-belt debris disk and a giant planet of 4-5MJup have been directly imaged. Our study aims to characterize the physical and orbital properties of HD95086b, search for additional planets at short and wide orbits and image the cold outer debris belt in scattered light. We used HARPS at the ESO 3.6m telescope to monitor the radial velocity of HD95086 over 2 years and investigate the existence of giant planets at less than 3au orbital distance. With the IRDIS dual-band imager and the IFS integral field spectrograph of SPHERE at VLT, we imaged the faint circumstellar environment beyond 10au at six epochs between 2015 and 2017. We do not detect additional giant planets around HD95086. We identified the nature (bound companion or background contaminant) of all point-like sources detected in the IRDIS field of view. None of them correspond to the ones recently discovered near the edge of the cold outer belt by ALMA. HD95086b is resolved for the first time in J-band with IFS. Its near-infrared spectral energy distribution is well fitted by a few dusty and/or young L7-L9 dwarf spectral templates. The extremely red 1-4um spectral distribution is typical of low-gravity objects at the L/T spectral type transition. The planet's orbital motion is resolved between January 2015 and May 2017. Together with past NaCo measurements properly re-calibrated, our orbital fitting solutions favor a retrograde low to moderate-eccentricity orbit e=0.2 (0.0 to 0.5), with a semi-major axis 52au corresponding to orbital periods of 288$ yrs and an inclination that peaks at i = 141deg, which is compatible with a planet-disk coplanar configuration. Finally, we report the detection in polarimetric differential imaging of the cold outer debris belt between 100 and 300au, consistent in radial extent with recent ALMA 1.3mm resolved observations.
  • A large number of systems harboring a debris disk show evidence for a double belt architecture. One hypothesis for explaining the gap between the belts is the presence of one or more planets dynamically carving it. This work aims to investigate this scenario in systems harboring two components debris disks. All the targets in the sample were observed with the SPHERE instrument which performs high-contrast direct imaging. Positions of the inner and outer belts were estimated by SED fitting of the infrared excesses or, when available, from resolved images of the disk. Very few planets have been observed so far in debris disks gaps and we intended to test if such non-detections depend on the observational limits of the present instruments. This aim is achieved by deriving theoretical predictions of masses, eccentricities and semi-major axes of planets able to open the observed gaps and comparing such parameters with detection limits obtained with SPHERE. The relation between the gap and the planet is due to the chaotic zone around the orbit of the planet. The radial extent of this zone depends on the mass ratio between the planet and the star, on the semi-major axis and on the eccentricity of the planet and it can be estimated analytically. We apply the formalism to the case of one planet on a circular or eccentric orbit. We then consider multi-planetary systems: 2 and 3 equal-mass planets on circular orbits and 2 equal-mass planets on eccentric orbits in a packed configuration. We then compare each couple of values (M,a), derived from the dynamical analysis of single and multiple planetary models, with the detection limits obtained with SPHERE. Our results show that the apparent lack of planets in gaps between double belts could be explained by the presence of a system of two or more planets possibly of low mass and on an eccentric orbits whose sizes are below the present detection limits.
  • We present observations of the known edge-on debris disk around HIP 79977 (HD 146897, F star in Upper Sco, 123 pc), taken with the ZIMPOL differential polarimeter of the SPHERE instrument in the Very Broad Band filter ($\lambda_c=735$ nm, $\Delta\lambda=290$ nm) with a spatial resolution of about 25 mas. We measure the polarization flux along and perpendicular to the disk spine of the highly inclined disk for projected separations between 0.2" (25 AU) and 1.6" (200 AU) and investigate the diagnostic potential of such data with model simulations. The polarized flux contrast ratio for the disk is $F_{pol}/F_\ast= (5.5 \pm 0.9) 10^{-4}$. The surface brightness reaches a maximum of 16.2 mag arcsec$^{-2}$ at a separation of $0.2"-0.5"$ along the disk spine with a maximum surface brightness contrast of 7.64 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. The polarized flux has a minimum near the star $<0.2"$ because no or only little polarization is produced by forward or backward scattering in the disk section lying in front of or behind the star. The data are modeled as a circular dust belt with an inclination $i=85(\pm 1.5)^\circ$ and a radius between $r_0$ = 60 AU and 90 AU. The radial density dependence is described by $(r/r_0)^{\alpha}$ with a steep power law index $\alpha=5$ inside $r_0$ and a more shallow index $\alpha=-2.5$ outside $r_0$. The scattering asymmetry factor lies between $g$ = 0.2 and 0.6 adopting a scattering angle-dependence for the fractional polarization as for Rayleigh scattering. Our data are qualitatively very similar to the case of AU Mic and they confirm that edge-on debris disks have a polarization minimum at a position near the star and a maximum near the projected separation of the main debris belt. The comparison of the polarized flux contrast ratio $F_{pol}/F_{\ast}$ with the fractional infrared excess provides strong constraints on the scattering albedo of the dust.
  • The substellar companion HD206893b has recently been discovered by direct imaging of its disc-bearing host star with the SPHERE instrument. We investigate the atypical properties of the companion, which has the reddest near-infrared colours among all known substellar objects, either orbiting a star or isolated, and we provide a comprehensive characterisation of the host star-disc-companion system. We conducted a follow-up of the companion with adaptive optics imaging and spectro-imaging with SPHERE, and a multiinstrument follow-up of its host star. We obtain a R=30 spectrum from 0.95 to 1.64 micron of the companion and additional photometry at 2.11 and 2.25 micron. We carried out extensive atmosphere model fitting for the companions and the host star in order to derive their age, mass, and metallicity. We found no additional companion in the system in spite of exquisite observing conditions resulting in sensitivity to 6MJup (2MJup) at 0.5" for an age of 300 Myr (50 Myr). We detect orbital motion over more than one year and characterise the possible Keplerian orbits. We constrain the age of the system to a minimum of 50 Myr and a maximum of 700 Myr, and determine that the host-star metallicity is nearly solar. The comparison of the companion spectrum and photometry to model atmospheres indicates that the companion is an extremely dusty late L dwarf, with an intermediate gravity (log g 4.5-5.0) which is compatible with the independent age estimate of the system. Though our best fit corresponds to a brown dwarf of 15-30 MJup aged 100-300 Myr, our analysis is also compatible with a range of masses and ages going from a 50 Myr 12MJup planetary-mass object to a 50 MJup Hyades-age brown dwarf...
  • July 5, 2017 astro-ph.EP
    The SHINE program is a large high-contrast near-infrared survey of 600 young, nearby stars. It is aimed at searching for and characterizing new planetary systems using VLT/SPHERE's unprecedented high-contrast and high-angular resolution imaging capabilities. It also intends at placing statistical constraints on the occurrence and orbital properties of the giant planet population at large orbits as a function of the stellar host mass and age to test planet formation theories. We use the IRDIS dual-band imager and the IFS integral field spectrograph of SPHERE to acquire high-constrast coronagraphic differential near-infrared images and spectra of the young A2 star HIP65426. It is a member of the ~17 Myr old Lower Centaurus-Crux association. At a separation of 830 mas (92 au projected) from the star, we detect a faint red companion. Multi-epoch observations confirm that it shares common proper motion with HIP65426. Spectro-photometric measurements extracted with IFS and IRDIS between 0.95 and 2.2um indicate a warm, dusty atmosphere characteristic of young low surface-gravity L5-L7 dwarfs. Hot-start evolutionary models predict a luminosity consistent with a 6-12 MJup, Teff=1300-1600 K and R=1.5 RJup giant planet. Finally, the comparison with Exo-REM and PHOENIX BT-Settl synthetic atmosphere models gives consistent effective temperatures but with slightly higher surface gravity solutions of log(g)=4.0-5.0 with smaller radii (1.0-1.3 RJup). Given its physical and spectral properties, HIP65426b occupies a rather unique placement in terms of age, mass and spectral-type among the currently known imaged planets. It represents a particularly interesting case to study the presence of clouds as a function of particle size, composition, and location in the atmosphere, to search for signatures of non-equilibrium chemistry, and finally to test the theory of planet formation and evolution.
  • We present the Vortex Image Processing (VIP) library, a python package dedicated to astronomical high-contrast imaging. Our package relies on the extensive python stack of scientific libraries and aims to provide a flexible framework for high-contrast data and image processing. In this paper, we describe the capabilities of VIP related to processing image sequences acquired using the angular differential imaging (ADI) observing technique. VIP implements functionalities for building high-contrast data processing pipelines, encompass- ing pre- and post-processing algorithms, potential sources position and flux estimation, and sensitivity curves generation. Among the reference point-spread function subtraction techniques for ADI post-processing, VIP includes several flavors of principal component analysis (PCA) based algorithms, such as annular PCA and incremental PCA algorithm capable of processing big datacubes (of several gigabytes) on a computer with limited memory. Also, we present a novel ADI algorithm based on non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), which comes from the same family of low-rank matrix approximations as PCA and provides fairly similar results. We showcase the ADI capabilities of the VIP library using a deep sequence on HR8799 taken with the LBTI/LMIRCam and its recently commissioned L-band vortex coronagraph. Using VIP we investigated the presence of additional companions around HR8799 and did not find any significant additional point source beyond the four known planets. VIP is available at http://github.com/vortex-exoplanet/VIP and is accompanied with Jupyter notebook tutorials illustrating the main functionalities of the library.
  • R Aqr is a symbiotic binary system consisting of a mira variable, a hot companion with a spectacular jet outflow, and an extended emission line nebula. We have used R Aqr as test target for the visual camera subsystem ZIMPOL, which is part of the new extreme adaptive optics (AO) instrument SPHERE at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). We compare our observations with data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and illustrate the complementarity of the two instruments. We determine from the Halpha emission the position, size, geometric structure, and line fluxes of the jet source and the clouds in the innermost region (<2") of R Aqr and determine Halpha emissivities mean density, mass, recombination time scale, and other cloud parameters. Our data resolve for the first time the R Aqr binary and we measure for the jet source a relative position 46+/-1 mas West of the mira. The central jet source is the strongest Halpha component. North east and south west from the central source there are many clouds with very diverse structures. We see in the SW a string of bright clouds arranged in a zig-zag pattern and, further out, more extended bubbles. In the N and NE we see a bright, very elongated filamentary structure and faint perpendicular "wisps" further out. Some jet clouds are also detected in the ZIMPOL [OI] and He I filters, as well as in the HST line filters for Halpha, [OIII], [NII], and [OI]. We determine jet cloud parameters and find a very well defined anti-correlation between cloud density and distance to the central binary. Future Halpha observations will provide the orientation of the orbital plane of the binary and allow detailed hydrodynamical investigations of this jet outflow and its interaction with the wind of the red giant companion.
  • The debris disk of HIP73145 has been detected in scattered light in the near-IR, and at far-IR wavelengths before, but no substructure has been seen so far. Detection of such substructures in combination with detailed modeling can hint at the presence of perturbing planetary bodies, or reveal other mechanisms acting to replenish gas and dust reservoirs and forming structures such as spirals or rings. We obtained multiwavelength images with SPHERE in the near-IR in the H2 and H3 bands with the IRDIS camera and a 0.95-1.35 micron spectral cube with the IFS. Data were acquired in pupil-tracking mode, thus allowing for angular differential imaging. The SPHERE standard suite of angular differential imaging algorithms was applied. ALMA Band 6 observations complement the SPHERE data. We detect a bright ring of scattered light plus more structures inside, at least one of them forming a secondary, concentric ring with the first. This is the first detection of this disk in total-intensity scattered light. A second object is detected in the field at high contrast but concluded to be a background star. Forward modeling yields information on the primary parameters of the disk and confirms that the detected substructures are not due to the data analysis approach, which sometimes leads to spurious structures. We detect a series of concentric rings in the disk around HIP73145. This is one of the rare cases where multiple components are necessary to fit the SED and are also detected in scattered light. The presence of such ring structures somewhat questions the nature of the object as a pure debris disk, but the gas and dust content would presumably offer sufficient explanations for such structures to form.
  • We present the first scattered-light images of the debris disk around 49 ceti, a ~40 Myr A1 main sequence star at 59 pc, famous for hosting two massive dust belts as well as large quantities of atomic and molecular gas. The outer disk is revealed in reprocessed archival Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS F110W images, as well as new coronagraphic H band images from the Very Large Telescope SPHERE instrument. The disk extends from 1.1" (65 AU) to 4.6" (250 AU), and is seen at an inclination of 73degr, which refines previous measurements at lower angular resolution. We also report no companion detection larger than 3 M_Jup at projected separations beyond 20 AU from the star (0.34"). Comparison between the F110W and H-band images is consistent with a grey color of 49 ceti's dust, indicating grains larger than >2microns. Our photometric measurements indicate a scattering efficiency / infrared excess ratio of 0.2-0.4, relatively low compared to other characterized debris disks. We find that 49 ceti presents morphological and scattering properties very similar to the gas-rich HD 131835 system. From our constraint on the disk inclination we find that the atomic gas previously detected in absorption must extend to the inner disk, and that the latter must be depleted of CO gas. Building on previous studies, we propose a schematic view of the system describing the dust and gas structure around 49 ceti and hypothetic scenarios for the gas nature and origin.
  • The recent discovery of an earth-like planet around Proxima Centauri has drawn much attention to this star and its environment. We performed a series of observations of Proxima Centauri using SPHERE, the planet finder instrument installed at the ESO Very Large Telescope UT3, using its near infrared modules, IRDIS and IFS. No planet was directly detected but we set upper limits on the mass up to 7 au exploiting the AMES-COND models. Our IFS observations reveal that no planet more massive than ~6-7 M Jup can be present within 1 au. The dual band imaging camera IRDIS also enables us to probe larger separations than the other techniques like the radial velocity or astrometry. We obtained mass limits of the order of 4 M Jup at separations of 2 au or larger representing the most stringent mass limits at separations larger than 5 au available at the moment. We also did an attempt to estimate the radius of possible planets around Proxima using the reflected light. Since the residual noise for this observations are dominated by photon noise and thermal background, longer exposures in good observing conditions could further improve the achievable contrast limit.
  • Whether BP Piscium (BP Psc) is either a pre-main sequence T Tauri star at d ~ 80 pc, or a post-main sequence G giant at d ~ 300 pc is still not clear. As a first-ascent giant, it is the first to be observed with a molecular and dust disk. Alternatively, BP Psc would be among the nearest T Tauri stars with a protoplanetary disk (PPD). We investigate whether the disk geometry resembles typical PPDs, by comparing polarimetric images with radiative transfer models. Our VLT/SPHERE/ZIMPOL observations allow us to perform Polarimetric Differential Imaging; Reference Star Differential Imaging; and Richardson-Lucy deconvolution. We present the first visible light polarization and intensity images of the disk of BP Psc. Our deconvolution confirms the disk shape as detected before, mainly showing the southern side of the disk. In polarized intensity the disk is imaged at larger detail and also shows the northern side, giving it the typical shape of high inclination flared disks. We explain the observed disk features by retrieving the large-scale geometry with MCMax radiative transfer modeling, which yields a strongly flared model, atypical for disks of T Tauri stars.
  • In 2015, we initiated a survey of Scorpius-Centaurus A-F stars that are predicted to host warm-inner and cold-outer belts of debris similar to the case of the system HR~8799. The survey aims to resolve the disks and detect planets responsible for the disk morphology. In this paper, we study the F-type star HIP~67497 and present a first-order modelisation of the disk in order to derive its main properties. We used the near-infrared integral field spectrograph (IFS) and dual-band imager IRDIS of VLT/SPHERE to obtain angular-differential imaging observations of the circumstellar environnement of HIP~67497. We removed the stellar halo with PCA and TLOCI algorithms. We modeled the disk emission with the GRaTeR code. We resolve a ring-like structure that extends up to $\sim$450 mas ($\sim$50 au) from the star in the IRDIS and IFS data. It is best reproduced by models of a non-eccentric ring with an inclination of $80\pm1^{\circ}$, a position angle of $-93\pm1^{\circ}$, and a semi-major axis of $59\pm3$ au. We also detect an additional, but fainter, arc-like structure with a larger extension (0.65 arcsec) South of the ring that we model as a second belt of debris at $\sim$130 au. We detect 10 candidate companions at separations $\geq$1''. We estimate the mass of putative perturbers responsible for the disk morphology and compare it to our detection limits. Additional data are needed to find those perturbers, and to relate our images to large-scale structures seen with HST/STIS.
  • We studied the well known circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 97048 with high angular resolution to reveal undetected structures in the disk, which may be indicative of disk evolutionary processes such as planet formation. We used the IRDIS near-IR subsystem of the extreme adaptive optics imager SPHERE at the ESO/VLT to study the scattered light from the circumstellar disk via high resolution polarimetry and angular differential imaging. We imaged the disk in unprecedented detail and revealed four ring-like brightness enhancements and corresponding gaps in the scattered light from the disk surface with radii between 39 au and 341 au. We derived the inclination and position angle as well as the height of the scattering surface of the disk from our observational data. We found that the surface height profile can be described by a single power law up to a separation ~270 au. Using the surface height profile we measured the scattering phase function of the disk and found that it is well consistent with theoretical models of compact dust aggregates. We discuss the origin of the detected features and find that low mass (< 1 M_Jup) nascent planets are a possible explanation.
  • Context: Extended circumstellar emission has been detected within a few 100 milli-arcsec around > 10% of nearby main sequence stars using near-infrared interferometry. Follow-up observations using other techniques, should they yield similar results or non-detections, can provide strong constraints on the origin of the emission. They can also reveal the variability of the phenomenon. Aims: We aim to demonstrate the persistence of the phenomenon over time scales of a few years and to search for variability of our previously detected excesses. Methods: Using VLTI/PIONIER in H band we have carried out multi-epoch observations of the stars for which a near-infrared excess was previously detected with the same observing technique and instrument. The detection rates and distribution of the excesses from our original survey and the follow-up observations are compared statistically. A search for variability of the excesses in our time series is carried out based on the level of the broadband excesses. Results: In 12 of 16 follow-up observations, an excess is re-detected with a significance of > 2 sigma, and in 7 of 16 follow-up observations significant excess (> 3 sigma) has been re-detected. We statistically demonstrate with very high confidence that the phenomenon persists for the majority of the systems. We also present the first detection of potential variability in two sources. Conclusions: We conclude that the phenomenon responsible for the excesses persists over time scales of a few years for the majority of the systems. However, we also find that variability intrinsic to a target can cause it to have no significant excess at the time of a specific observation.
  • Debris disks offer valuable insights into the latest stages of circumstellar disk evolution, and can possibly help us to trace the outcomes of planetary formation processes. In the age range 10 to 100\,Myr, most of the gas is expected to have been removed from the system, giant planets (if any) must have already been formed, and the formation of terrestrial planets may be on-going. Pluto-sized planetesimals, and their debris released in a collisional cascade, are under their mutual gravitational influence, which may result into non-axisymmetric structures in the debris disk. High angular resolution observations are required to investigate these effects and constrain the dynamical evolution of debris disks. Furthermore, multi-wavelength observations can provide information about the dust dynamics by probing different grain sizes. Here we present new VLT/SPHERE and ALMA observations of the debris disk around the 40\,Myr-old solar-type star HD\,61005. We resolve the disk at unprecedented resolution both in the near-infrared (in scattered and polarized light) and at millimeter wavelengths. Thanks to the new observations, we propose a solution for both the radial and azimuthal distribution of the dust grains in the debris disk. We find that the disk has a moderate eccentricity ($e \sim 0.1$) and that the dust density is two times larger at the pericenter compared to the apocenter. With no giant planets detected in our observations, we investigate alternative explanations besides planet-disk interactions to interpret the inferred disk morphology. We postulate that the morphology of the disk could be the consequence of a massive collision between $\sim$\,1000\,km-sized bodies at $\sim$\,61\,au. If this interpretation holds, it would put stringent constraints on the formation of massive planetesimals at large distances from the star.
  • Transition disks correspond to a short stage between the young protoplanetary phase and older debris phase. Along this evolutionary sequence, the gas component disappears leaving room for a dust-dominated environment where already-formed planets signpost their gravitational perturbations. We endeavor to study the very inner region of the well-known and complex debris, but still gas-rich disk, around HD 141569A using the exquisite high-contrast capability of SPHERE at the VLT. Recent near-infrared (IR) images suggest a relatively depleted cavity within ~200 au, while former mid-IR data indicate the presence of dust at separations shorter than ~100 au. We obtained multi-wavelength images in the near-IR in J, H2, H3 and Ks bands with the IRDIS camera and a 0.95-1.35 micrometers spectral data cube with the IFS. Data were acquired in pupil-tracking mode, thus allowing for angular differential imaging. We discovered several new structures inside 1", of which the most prominent is a bright ring with sharp edges (semi-major axis: 0.4") featuring a strong north-south brightness asymmetry. Other faint structures are also detected from 0.4" to 1" in the form of concentric ringlets and at least one spiral arm. Finally, the VISIR data at 8.6 micrometers suggests the presence of an additional dust population closer in. Besides, we do not detect companions more massive than 1-3 mass of Jupiter. The performance of SPHERE allows us to resolve the extended dust component, which was previously detected at thermal and visible wavelengths, into very complex patterns with strong asymmetries ; the nature of these asymmetries remains to be understood. Scenarios involving shepherding by planets or dust-gas interactions will have to be tested against these observations.
  • Context. It has recently been proposed that the surface composition of icy main-belt asteroids (B-,C-,Cb-,Cg-,P-,and D-types) may be consistent with that of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CPIDPs). Aims. In the light of this new association, we re-examine the surface composition of a sample of asteroids belonging to the Themis family in order to place new constraints on the formation and evolution of its parent body. Methods. We acquired NIR spectral data for 15 members of the Themis family and complemented this dataset with existing spectra in the visible and mid-infrared ranges to perform a thorough analysis of the composition of the family. Assuming end-member minerals and particle sizes (<2\mum) similar to those found in CPIDPs, we used a radiative transfer code adapted for light scattering by small particles to model the spectral properties of these asteroids. Results. Our best-matching models indicate that most objects in our sample possess a surface composition that is consistent with the composition of CP IDPs.We find ultra-fine grained Fe-bearing olivine glasses to be among the dominant constituents. We further detect the presence of minor fractions of Mg-rich crystalline silicates. The few unsuccessfully matched asteroids may indicate the presence of interlopers in the family or objects sampling a distinct compositional layer of the parent body. Conclusions. The composition inferred for the Themis family members suggests that the parent body accreted from a mixture of ice and anhydrous silicates (mainly amorphous) and subsequently underwent limited heating. By comparison with existing thermal models that assume a 400km diameter progenitor, the accretion process of the Themis parent body must have occurred relatively late (>4Myr after CAIs) so that only moderate internal heating occurred in its interior, preventing aqueous alteration of the outer shell.
  • [Abridged] Context. The young systems PZ Tel and HD 1160, hosting known low-mass companions, were observed during the commissioning of the new planet finder SPHERE with several imaging and spectroscopic modes. Aims. We aim to refine the physical properties and architecture of both systems. Methods. We use SPHERE commissioning data and REM observations, as well as literature and unpublished data from VLT/SINFONI, VLT/NaCo, Gemini/NICI, and Keck/NIRC2. Results. We derive new photometry and confirm the nearly daily photometric variability of PZ Tel A. Using literature data spanning 38 yr, we show that the star also exhibits a long-term variability trend. The 0.63-3.8 mic SED of PZ Tel B allows us to revise its properties: spectral type M7+/-1, Teff=2700+/-100 K, log(g)<4.5 dex, log(L/L_Sun)=-2.51+/-0.10 dex, and mass 38-72 MJ. The 1-3.8 mic SED of HD 1160 B suggests a massive brown dwarf or a low-mass star with spectral type M5.5-7.0, Teff=3000+/-100 K, [M/H]=-0.5-0.0 dex, log(L/L_Sun)=-2.81+/-0.10 dex, and mass 39-168 MJ. We confirm the deceleration and high eccentricity (e>0.66) of PZ Tel B. For e<0.9, the inclination, longitude of the ascending node, and time of periastron passage are well constrained. The system is seen close to an edge-on geometry. We reject other brown dwarf candidates outside 0.25" for both systems, and massive giant planets (>4 MJ) outside 0.5" for the PZ Tel system. We also show that K1-K2 color can be used with YJH low-resolution spectra to identify young L-type companions, provided high photometric accuracy (<0.05 mag) is achieved. Conclusions. SPHERE opens new horizons in the study of young brown dwarfs and giant exoplanets thanks to high-contrast imaging capabilities at optical and near-infrared wavelengths, as well as high signal-to-noise spectroscopy in the near-infrared from low (R~30-50) to medium resolutions (R~350).
  • GJ758 B is a brown dwarf companion to a nearby (15.76 pc) solar-type, metal-rich (M/H = +0.2 dex) main-sequence star (G9V) that was discovered with Subaru/HiCIAO in 2009. From previous studies, it has drawn attention as being the coldest (~600K) companion ever directly imaged around a neighboring star. We present new high-contrast data obtained during the commissioning of the SPHERE instrument at the VLT. The data was obtained in Y-, J-, H-, and Ks-bands with the dual-band imaging (DBI) mode of IRDIS, providing a broad coverage of the full near-infrared (near-IR) range at higher contrast and better spectral sampling than previously reported. In this new set of high-quality data, we report the re-detection of the companion, as well as the first detection of a new candidate closer-in to the star. We use the new 8 photometric points for an extended comparison of GJ758 B with empirical objects and 4 families of atmospheric models. From comparison to empirical object, we estimate a T8 spectral type, but none of the comparison object can accurately represent the observed near-IR fluxes of GJ758 B. From comparison to atmospheric models, we attribute a Teff = 600K $\pm$ 100K, but we find that no atmospheric model can adequately fit all the fluxes of GJ758 B. The photometry of the new candidate companion is broadly consistent with L-type objects, but a second epoch with improved photometry is necessary to clarify its status. The new astrometry of GJ758 B shows a significant proper motion since the last epoch. We use this result to improve the determination of the orbital characteristics using two fitting approaches, Least-Square Monte Carlo and Markov Chain Monte Carlo. Finally, we analyze the sensitivity of our data to additional closer-in companions and reject the possibility of other massive brown dwarf companions down to 4-5 AU. [abridged]