• Betelgeuse is an M-type supergiant that presents a circularly polarized (Stokes V) signal in its line profiles, interpreted in terms of a surface magnetic field. The weak circular polarization signal has been monitored over 7.5 years in order to follow its evolution on different timescales, and eventually to determine its physical origin. Linear polarization measurements have also been obtained regularly in the last few years. We used both the ESPaDOnS and Narval spectropolarimeters to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectra, which were processed by means of the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) method. In order to ensure the reality of the very weak circular polarization, special care has been taken to limit instrumental effects. In addition, several tests were performed on the Stokes V signal to establish its stellar and Zeeman origin. We confirm the magnetic nature of the circular polarization, pointing to a surface magnetic field of the order of 1G. The Stokes V profiles present variations over different timescales, the most prominent one being close to the long secondary period (LSP; around 2000d for Betelgeuse) often invoked in red evolved stars. This long period is also dominant for all the other Stokes parameters. The circular polarization is tentatively modeled by means of magnetic field concentrations mimicking spots, showing in particular that the velocity associated with each "spot" also follows the long timescale, and that this signal is nearly always slightly redshifted. From the coupled variations of both linear and circular polarization signatures in amplitude, velocity and timescale, we favour giant convection cells as the main engine at the origin of polarization signatures and variations in all the Stokes parameters. This strengthens support for the hypothesis that large convective cells are at the origin of the LSP.
  • The goal of this work is to study the cool, active binary star $\sigma^2$ CrB, focussing on its magnetic field. We used Stokes $IV$ data from the twin spectropolarimeters Narval at the TBL and ESPaDOnS at the CFHT. The least-squares deconvolution multi-line technique was used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. We then applied a new binary Zeeman-Doppler imaging code to reconstruct simultaneously the magnetic topology and brightness distribution of both components. This analysis was carried out for two observational epochs in 2014 and 2017. A previously unconfirmed magnetic field of the primary star has been securely detected. The polarisation signatures of the secondary appear to have a systematically larger amplitude than that of the primary. This corresponds to a stronger magnetic field, for which the magnetic energy of the secondary exceeds that of the primary by a factor of 3.3-5.7. While the magnetic energy is similar for the secondary star in the two epochs, the magnetic energy is about twice as high in 2017 for the primary. The magnetic field topology of the two stars in the earlier epoch (2014) is very different. In the earlier epoch, the magnetic field at the visible pole appears to be of opposite polarity for the primary and secondary, suggesting linked magnetospheres. The apparent rotational periods of both $\sigma^2$ CrB components are longer than the orbital period, which we interpret as an evidence of a solar-like differential rotation. Despite their nearly identical fundamental parameters, the components of $\sigma^2$ CrB system exhibit different magnetic field properties. This indicates that the magnetic dynamo process is a very sensitive function of stellar parameters.
  • M dwarfs are the most numerous stars in our Galaxy with masses between approximately 0.5 and 0.1 solar mass. Many of them show surface activity qualitatively similar to our Sun and generate flares, high X-ray fluxes, and large-scale magnetic fields. Such activity is driven by a dynamo powered by the convective motions in their interiors. Understanding properties of stellar magnetic fields in these stars finds a broad application in astrophysics, including, e.g., theory of stellar dynamos and environment conditions around planets that may be orbiting these stars. Most stars with convective envelopes follow a rotation-activity relationship where various activity indicators saturate in stars with rotation periods shorter than a few days. The activity gradually declines with rotation rate in stars rotating more slowly. It is thought that due to a tight empirical correlation between X-ray and magnetic flux, the stellar magnetic fields will also saturate, to values around ~4kG. Here we report the detection of magnetic fields above the presumed saturation limit in four fully convective M-dwarfs. By combining results from spectroscopic and polarimetric studies we explain our findings in terms of bistable dynamo models: stars with the strongest magnetic fields are those in a dipole dynamo state, while stars in a multipole state cannot generate fields stronger than about four kilogauss. Our study provides observational evidence that dynamo in fully convective M dwarfs generates magnetic fields that can differ not only in the geometry of their large scale component, but also in the total magnetic energy.
  • There is a large change in surface rotation rates of sun-like stars on the pre-main sequence and early main sequence. Since these stars have dynamo driven magnetic fields, this implies a strong evolution of their magnetic properties over this time period. The spin-down of these stars is controlled by interactions between stellar winds and magnetic fields, thus magnetic evolution in turn plays an important role in rotational evolution. We present here the second part of a study investigating the evolution of large-scale surface magnetic fields in this critical time period. We observed stars in open clusters and stellar associations with known ages between 120 and 650 Myr, and used spectropolarimetry and Zeeman Doppler Imaging to characterize their large-scale magnetic field strength and geometry. We report 15 stars with magnetic detections here. These stars have masses from 0.8 to 0.95 Msun, rotation periods from 0.326 to 10.6 days, and we find large-scale magnetic field strengths from 8.5 to 195 G with a wide range of geometries. We find a clear trend towards decreasing magnetic field strength with age, and a power-law decrease in magnetic field strength with Rossby number. There is some tentative evidence for saturation of the large-scale magnetic field strength at Rossby numbers below 0.1, although the saturation point is not yet well defined. Comparing to younger classical T Tauri stars, we support the hypothesis that differences in internal structure produce large differences in observed magnetic fields, however for weak lined T Tauri stars this is less clear.
  • Based on optical high-resolution spectra obtained with CFHT/ESPaDOnS, we present new measurements of activity and magnetic field proxies of 442 low-mass K5-M7 dwarfs. The objects were analysed as potential targets to search for planetary-mass companions with the new spectropolarimeter and high-precision velocimeter, SPIRou. We have analysed their high-resolution spectra in an homogeneous way: circular polarisation, chromospheric features, and Zeeman broadening of the FeH infrared line. The complex relationship between these activity indicators is analysed: while no strong connection is found between the large-scale and small-scale magnetic fields, the latter relates with the non-thermal flux originating in the chromosphere. We then examine the relationship between various activity diagnostics and the optical radial-velocity jitter available in the literature, especially for planet host stars. We use this to derive for all stars an activity merit function (higher for quieter stars) with the goal of identifying the most favorable stars where the radial-velocity jitter is low enough for planet searches. We find that the main contributors to the RV jitter are the large-scale magnetic field and the chromospheric non-thermal emission. In addition, three stars (GJ 1289, GJ 793, and GJ 251) have been followed along their rotation using the spectropolarimetric mode, and we derive their magnetic topology. These very slow rotators are good representatives of future SPIRou targets. They are compared to other stars where the magnetic topology is also known. The poloidal component of the magnetic field is predominent in all three stars.
  • Magnetic activity and rotation are known to be intimately linked for low-mass stars. Understanding rotation evolution over the stellar lifetime is therefore an important goal within stellar astrophysics. In recent years, there has been increased focus on how the complexity of the stellar magnetic field affects the rate of angular momentum-loss from a star. This is a topic that Zeeman-Doppler imaging (ZDI), a technique that is capable of reconstructing the large-scale magnetic field topology of a star, can uniquely address. Using a potential field source surface model, we estimate the open flux, mass loss-rate and angular momentum-loss rates for a sample of 66 stars that have been mapped with ZDI. We show that the open flux of a star is predominantly determined by the dipolar component of its magnetic field for our choice of source surface radius. We also show that, on the main sequence, the open flux, mass- and angular momentum-loss rates increase with decreasing Rossby number. The exception to this rule is stars less massive than $0.3M_{\odot}$. Previous work suggests that low mass M dwarfs may possess either strong, ordered and dipolar fields or weak and complex fields. This range of field strengths results in a large spread of angular momentum-loss rates for these stars and has important consequences for their spin down behaviour. Additionally, our models do not predict a transition in the mass-loss rates at the so called wind dividing line noted from Ly$\alpha$ studies.
  • We report the results of an extended spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri star TAP 26, carried out within the MaTYSSE programme with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Applying Zeeman-Doppler Imaging to our observations, concentrating in 2015 November and 2016 January and spanning 72 d in total, 16 d in 2015 November and 13 d in 2016 January, we reconstruct surface brightness and magnetic field maps for both epochs and demonstrate that both distributions exhibit temporal evolution not explained by differential rotation alone. We report the detection of a hot Jupiter (hJ) around TAP 26 using three different methods, two using Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI) and one Gaussian-Process Regression (GPR), with a false-alarm probability smaller than 6.10^-4. However, as a result of the aliasing related to the observing window, the orbital period cannot be uniquely determined; the orbital period with highest likelihood is 10.79 +/- 0.14 d followed by 8.99 +/- 0.09 d. Assuming the most likely period, and that the planet orbits in the stellar equatorial plane, we obtain that the planet has a minimum mass M.sin(i) of 1.66 +/- 0.31 M_Jup and orbits at 0.0968 +/- 0.0032 au from its host star. This new detection suggests that disc type II migration is efficient at generating newborn hJs, and that hJs may be more frequent around young T Tauri stars than around mature stars (or that the MaTYSSE sample is biased towards hJ-hosting stars).
  • Magnetic fields are essential ingredients of many physical processes in the interiors and envelopes of cool stars. Yet their direct detection and characterisation is notoriously difficult, requiring high-quality observations and advanced analysis techniques. Significant progress has been recently achieved by several types of direct magnetic field studies on the surfaces of cool active stars. In particular, complementary techniques of the field topology mapping with polarisation data and total magnetic flux measurements from intensity spectra have been systematically applied to different classes of active stars leading to interesting and occasionally controversial results. In this paper we summarise the current status of direct magnetic field studies of cool stars, and investigations of surface inhomogeneities caused by the field, based on the material presented at the Cool Stars 19 splinter session.
  • We present a spectropolarimetric snapshot survey of solar-type planet hosting stars. In addition to 14 planet-hosting stars observed as part of the BCool magnetic snapshot survey, we obtained magnetic observations of a further 19 planet-hosting solar-type stars in order to see if the presence of close-in planets had an effect on the measured surface magnetic field (|B$_{\ell}$|). Our results indicate that the magnetic activity of this sample is congruent with that of the overall BCool sample. The effects of the planetary systems on the magnetic activity of the parent star, if any, are too subtle to detect compared to the intrinsic dispersion and correlations with rotation, age and stellar activity proxies in our sample. Four of the 19 newly observed stars, two of which are subgiants, have unambiguously detected magnetic fields and are future targets for Zeeman Doppler Mapping.
  • We report results of an extended spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri star V830 Tau and its recently-detected newborn close-in giant planet. Our observations, carried out within the MaTYSSE programme, were spread over 91d, and involved the ESPaDOnS and Narval spectropolarimeters linked to the 3.6m Canada-France-Hawaii, the 2m Bernard Lyot and the 8-m Gemini-North Telescopes. Using Zeeman-Doppler Imaging, we characterize the surface brightness distributions, magnetic topologies and surface differential rotation of V830 Tau at the time of our observations, and demonstrate that both distributions evolve with time beyond what is expected from differential rotation. We also report that near the end of our observations, V830 Tau triggered one major flare and two weaker precursors, showing up as enhanced red-shifted emission in multiple spectral activity proxies. With 3 different filtering techniques, we model the radial velocity (RV) activity jitter (of semi-amplitude 1.2km/s) that V830 Tau generates, successfully retrieve the 68m/s RV planet signal hiding behind the jitter, further confirm the existence of V830 Tau b and better characterize its orbital parameters. We find that the method based on Gaussian-process regression performs best thanks to its higher ability at modelling not only the activity jitter, but also its temporal evolution over the course of our observations, and succeeds at reproducing our RV data down to a rms precision of 35m/s. Our result provides new observational constraints on scenarios of star / planet formation and demonstrates the scientific potential of large-scale searches for close-in giant planets around T Tauri stars.
  • The magnetic geometry of the surface magnetic fields of more than 55 cool stars have now been mapped using spectropolarimetry. In order to better understand these observations, we compare the magnetic field topology at different surface scale sizes of observed and simulated cool stars. For ease of comparison between the high-resolution non-potential magnetofrictional simulations and the relatively low-resolution observations, we filter out the small-scale field in the simulations using a spherical harmonics decomposition. We show that the large-scale field topologies of the solar-based simulations produce values of poloidal/toroidal fields and fractions of energy in axisymmetric modes that are similar to the observations. These global non-potential evolution model simulations capture key magnetic features of the observed solar-like stars through the processes of surface flux transport and magnetic flux emergence. They do not, however, reproduce the magnetic field of M-dwarfs or stars with dominantly toroidal field. Furthermore, we analyse the magnetic field topologies of individual spherical harmonics for the simulations and discover that the dipole is predominately poloidal, while the quadrupole shows the highest fraction of toroidal fields. Magnetic field structures smaller than a quadrupole display a fixed ratio between the poloidal and toroidal magnetic energies.
  • Zeeman Doppler imaging has successfully mapped the large-scale magnetic fields of stars over a large range of spectral types, rotation periods and ages. When observed over multiple epochs, some stars show polarity reversals in their global magnetic fields. On the Sun, polarity reversals are a feature of its activity cycle. In this paper, we examine the magnetic properties of stars with existing chromospherically determined cycle periods. Previous authors have suggested that cycle periods lie on multiple branches, either in the cycle period-Rossby number plane or the cycle period-rotation period plane. We find some evidence that stars along the active branch show significant average toroidal fields that exhibit large temporal variations while stars exclusively on the inactive branch remain dominantly poloidal throughout their entire cycle. This lends credence to the idea that different shear layers are in operation along each branch. There is also evidence that the short magnetic polarity switches observed on some stars are characteristic of the inactive branch while the longer chromospherically determined periods are characteristic of the active branch. This may explain the discrepancy between the magnetic and chromospheric cycle periods found on some stars. These results represent a first attempt at linking global magnetic field properties obtained form ZDI and activity cycles.
  • In this paper we show how tomographic imaging (Zeeman Doppler Imaging, ZDI) can be used to characterize stellar activity and magnetic field topologies, ultimately allowing to filter out the radial velocity (RV) activity jitter of M-dwarf moderate rotators. This work is based on spectropolarimetric observations of a sample of five weakly-active early M-dwarfs (GJ 205, GJ 358, GJ 410, GJ479, GJ 846) with HARPS-Pol and NARVAL. These stars have v sin i and RV jitters in the range 1-2 km/s and 2.7-10.0 m/s rms respectively. Using a modified version of ZDI applied to sets of phase-resolved Least-Squares- Decon- volved (LSD) profiles of unpolarized spectral lines, we are able to characterize the distribution of active regions at the stellar surfaces. We find that darks spots cover less than 2% of the total surface of the stars of our sample. Our technique is e cient at modeling the rotationally mod- ulated component of the activity jitter, and succeeds at decreasing the amplitude of this com- ponent by typical factors of 2-3 and up to 6 in optimal cases. From the rotationally modulated time-series of circularly polarized spectra and with ZDI, we also reconstruct the large-scale magnetic field topology. These fields suggest that bi-stability of dynamo processes observed in active M dwarfs may also be at work for moderately active M dwarfs. Comparing spot distributions with field topologies suggest that dark spots causing activity jitter concentrate at the magnetic pole and/or equator, to be confirmed with future data on a larger sample.
  • The long-term monitoring of magnetic cycles in cool stars is a key diagnostic in understanding how dynamo generation and amplification of magnetic fields occur in stars similar in structure to the Sun. We investigate the temporal evolution of a possible magnetic cycle, determined from its large-scale field, of 61 Cyg A over its activity cycle using spectropolarimetric observations and compare it to the solar case. We use Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI) to reconstruct the large-scale magnetic geometry over multiple observational epochs spread over a time span of nine years. We investigate the time evolution of the different components of the large-scale field and compare it with the evolution of its chromospheric activity by measuring the flux in three different chromospheric indicators: Ca II H&K, H-alpha and Ca II infra red triplet lines. We also compare our results with the star's coronal activity using XMM-Newton observations. The large-scale magnetic geometry of 61 Cyg A exhibits polarity reversals in both poloidal and toroidal field components, in phase with the chromospheric activity cycle. We also detect weak solar-like differential rotation with a shear level similar to the Sun. During our observational time span of nine years, 61 Cyg A exhibits solar-like variations in its large-scale field geometry as it evolves from minimum activity to maximum activity and vice versa. During its activity minimum in epoch 2007.59, ZDI reconstructs a simple dipolar geometry which becomes more complex close to activity maximum in epoch 2010.55. The radial field flips polarity and reverts back to a simple geometry in epoch 2013.61. The field is strongly dipolar and the evolution of the dipole component of the field is reminiscent of the solar behaviour. The polarity reversal of the large-scale field indicates a magnetic cycle that is in phase with the chromospheric and coronal cycle.
  • We report magnetic field measurements for Kappa1~Cet, a proxy of the young Sun when life arose on Earth. We carry out an analysis of the magnetic properties determined from spectropolarimetric observations and reconstruct its large-scale surface magnetic field to derive the magnetic environment, stellar winds and particle flux permeating the interplanetary medium around Kappa1~Cet. Our results show a closer magnetosphere and mass-loss rate of Mdot = 9.7 x 10^{-13} Msol/yr, i.e., a factor 50 times larger than the current solar wind mass-loss rate, resulting in a larger interaction via space weather disturbances between the stellar wind and a hypothetical young-Earth analogue, potentially affecting the planet's habitability. Interaction of the wind from the young Sun with the planetary ancient magnetic field may have affected the young Earth and its life conditions
  • The surface rotation rates of young solar-type stars vary rapidly with age from the end of the pre-main sequence through the early main sequence. Important changes in the dynamos operating in these stars may result from this evolution, which should be observable in their surface magnetic fields. Here we present a study aimed at observing the evolution of these magnetic fields through this critical time period. We observed stars in open clusters and stellar associations of known ages, and used Zeeman Doppler Imaging to characterize their complex magnetic large-scale fields. Presented here are results for 15 stars, from 5 associations, with ages from 20 to 250 Myr, masses from 0.7 to 1.2 solar masses, and rotation periods from 0.4 to 6 days. We find complex large-scale magnetic field geometries, with global average strengths from 14 to 140 G. There is a clear trend towards decreasing average large-scale magnetic field strength with age, and a tight correlation between magnetic field strength and Rossby number. Comparing the magnetic properties of our zero-age main sequence sample to those of both younger and older stars, it appears that the magnetic evolution of solar-type stars during the pre-main sequence is primarily driven by structural changes, while it closely follows the stars' rotational evolution on the main sequence.
  • (shortened for arXiv) We aim to progress towards more efficient exoplanet detection around active stars by optimizing the use of Doppler Imaging in radial velocity measurements. We propose a simple method to simultaneously extract a brightness map and a set of orbital parameters through a tomographic inversion technique derived from classical Doppler mapping. Based on the maximum entropy principle, the underlying idea is to determine the set of orbital parameters that minimizes the information content of the resulting Doppler map. We carry out a set of numerical simulations to perform a preliminary assessment of the robustness of our method, using an actual Doppler map of the very active star HR 1099 to produce a realistic synthetic data set for various sets of orbital parameters of a single planet in a circular orbit. Using a simulated time-series of 50 line profiles affected by a peak-to-peak activity jitter of 2.5 km/s, we are able in most cases to recover the radial velocity amplitude, orbital phase and orbital period of an artificial planet down to a radial velocity semi-amplitude of the order of the radial velocity scatter due to the photon noise alone (about 50 m/s in our case). One noticeable exception occurs when the planetary orbit is close to co-rotation, in which case significant biases are observed in the reconstructed radial velocity amplitude, while the orbital period and phase remain robustly recovered. The present method constitutes a very simple way to extract orbital parameters from heavily distorted line profiles of active stars, when more classical radial velocity detection methods generally fail. It is easily adaptable to most existing Doppler Imaging codes, paving the way towards a systematic search for close-in planets orbiting young, rapidly-rotating stars.
  • The "Binarity and Magnetic Interactions in various classes of stars" (BinaMIcS) project is based on two large programs of spectropolarimetric observations with ESPaDOnS at CFHT and Narval at TBL. Three samples of spectroscopic binaries with two spectra (SB2) are observed: known cool magnetic binaries, the few known hot magnetic binaries, and a survey sample of hot binaries to search for additional hot magnetic binaries. The goal of BinaMIcS is to understand the complex interplay between stellar magnetism and binarity. To this aim, we will characterise and model the magnetic fields, magnetospheric structure and coupling of both components of hot and cool close binary systems over a significant range of evolutionary stages, to confront current theories and trigger new ones. First results already provided interesting clues, e.g. about the origin of magnetism in hot stars.
  • Surface rotation rates of young solar-type stars display drastic changes at the end of the pre-main sequence through the early main sequence. This may trigger corresponding changes in the magnetic dynamos operating in these stars, which ought to be observable in their surface magnetic fields. We present here the first results of an observational effort aimed at characterizing the evolution of stellar magnetic fields through this critical phase. We observed stars from open clusters and associations, which range from 20 to 600 Myr, and used Zeeman Doppler Imaging to characterize their complex magnetic fields. We find a clear trend towards weaker magnetic fields for older ages, as well as a tight correlation between magnetic field strength and Rossby number over this age range. Comparing to results for younger T Tauri stars, we observe a very significant change in magnetic strength and geometry, as the radiative core develops during the late pre-main sequence.
  • Spectropolarimetric observations have been used to map stellar magnetic fields, many of which display strong bands of azimuthal fields that are toroidal. A number of explanations have been proposed to explain how such fields might be generated though none are definitive. In this paper, we examine the toroidal fields of a sample of 55 stars with magnetic maps, with masses in the range 0.1-1.5$\,{\rm M}_\odot$. We find that the energy contained in toroidal fields has a power law dependence on the energy contained in poloidal fields. However the power index is not constant across our sample, with stars less and more massive than 0.5$\,{\rm M}_\odot$ having power indices of 0.72$\pm$0.08 and 1.25$\pm$0.06 respectively. There is some evidence that these two power laws correspond to stars in the saturated and unsaturated regimes of the rotation-activity relation. Additionally, our sample shows that strong toroidal fields must be generated axisymmetrically. The latitudes at which these bands appear depend on the stellar rotation period with fast rotators displaying higher latitude bands than slow rotators. The results in this paper present new constraints for future dynamo studies.
  • We analyse the magnetic activity characteristics of the planet hosting Sun-like star, HD 1237, using HARPS spectro-polarimetric time-series data. We find evidence of rotational modulation of the magnetic longitudinal field measurements consistent with our ZDI analysis, with a period of 7 days. We investigate the effect of customising the LSD mask to the line depths of the observed spectrum and find that it has a minimal effect on shape of the extracted Stokes V profile but does result in a small increase in the S/N ($\sim$ 7%). We find that using a Milne-Eddington solution to describe the local line profile provides a better fit to the LSD profiles in this slowly rotating star, which also impacts the recovered ZDI field distribution. We also introduce a fit-stopping criterion based on the information content (entropy) of the ZDI maps solution set. The recovered magnetic field maps show a strong (+90 G) ring-like azimuthal field distribution and a complex radial field dominating at mid latitudes ($\sim$45 degrees). Similar magnetic field maps are recovered from data acquired five months apart. Future work will investigate how this surface magnetic field distribution impacts the coronal magnetic field and extended environment around this planet-hosting star.
  • The large-scale magnetic field of solar-type stars reconstructed from their spectropolarimetric observations provide important insight into their underlying dynamo processes.We aim to investigate the temporal variability of the large-scale surface magnetic field and chromospheric activity of a young solar analogue, the G0 dwarf HN Peg.The large-scale surface magnetic field topology is reconstructed using Zeeman Doppler Imaging at six observational epochs covering seven years.We also investigated the chromospheric activity variations by measuring the flux in the line cores of the three chromospheric activity indicators: Ca II H&K, H alpha, and the Ca II IRT lines.The magnetic topology of HN Peg shows a complex and variable geometry. While the radial field exhibits a stable positive polarity magnetic region at the poles at each observational epoch, the azimuthal field is strongly variable in strength, where a strong band of positive polarity magnetic field is present at equatorial latitudes. This field disappears during the middle of our time span, reappearing again during the last two epochs of observations. The mean magnetic field derived from the magnetic maps also follow a similar trend to the toroidal field, with the field strength at a minimum in epoch 2009.54. Summing the line of sight magnetic field over the visible surface at each observation, HN Peg exhibits a weak longitudinal magnetic field ranging from -14 G to 13 G, with no significant long-term trend, although there is significant rotational variability within each epoch. Those chromospheric activity indicators exhibit more long-term variations over the time span of observations, where the minimal is observed in Epoch 2008.71.
  • Stellar flares, winds and coronal mass ejections form the space weather. They are signatures of the magnetic activity of cool stars and, since activity varies with age, mass and rotation, the space weather that extra-solar planets experience can be very different from the one encountered by the solar system planets. How do stellar activity and magnetism influence the space weather of exoplanets orbiting main-sequence stars? How do the environments surrounding exoplanets differ from those around the planets in our own solar system? How can the detailed knowledge acquired by the solar system community be applied in exoplanetary systems? How does space weather affect habitability? These were questions that were addressed in the splinter session "Cool stars and Space Weather", that took place on 9 Jun 2014, during the Cool Stars 18 meeting. In this paper, we present a summary of the contributions made to this session.
  • We report results of a spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri star LkCa4 within the MaTYSSE programme, involving ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Despite an age of only 2Myr and a similarity with prototypical classical T Tauri stars, LkCa4 shows no evidence for accretion and probes an interesting transition stage for star and planet formation. Large profile distortions and Zeeman signatures are detected in the unpolarized and circularly-polarized lines of LkCa4 using Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD), indicating the presence of brightness inhomogeneities and magnetic fields at the surface of LkCa4. Using tomographic imaging, we reconstruct brightness and magnetic maps of LkCa4 from sets of unpolarized and circularly-polarized LSD profiles. The large-scale field is strong and mainly axisymmetric, featuring a ~2kG poloidal component and a ~1kG toroidal component encircling the star at equatorial latitudes - the latter making LkCa4 markedly different from classical TTauri stars of similar mass and age. The brightness map includes a dark spot overlapping the magnetic pole and a bright region at mid latitudes - providing a good match to the contemporaneous photometry. We also find that differential rotation at the surface of LkCa4 is small, typically ~5.5x weaker than that of the Sun, and compatible with solid-body rotation. Using our tomographic modelling, we are able to filter out the activity jitter in the RV curve of LkCa4 (of full amplitude 4.3km/s) down to a rms precision of 0.055km/s. Looking for hot Jupiters around young Sun-like stars thus appears feasible, even though we find no evidence for such planets around LkCa4.
  • Important insights into the formation, structure, evolution and environment of all types of stars can be obtained through the measurement of their winds and possible magnetospheres. However, this has hardly been done up to now mainly because of the lack of UV instrumentation available for long periods of time. To reach this aim, we have designed UVMag, an M-size space mission equipped with a high-resolution spectropolarimeter working in the UV and visible spectral range. The UV domain is crucial in stellar physics as it is very rich in atomic and molecular lines and contains most of the flux of hot stars. Moreover, covering the UV and visible spectral domains at the same time will allow us to study the star and its environment simultaneously. Adding polarimetric power to the spectrograph will multiply tenfold the capabilities of extracting information on stellar magnetospheres, winds, disks, and magnetic fields. Examples of science objectives that can be reached with UVMag are presented for pre-main sequence, main sequence and evolved stars. They will cast new light onto stellar physics by addressing many exciting and important questions. UVMag is currently undergoing a Research and Technology study and will be proposed at the forthcoming ESA call for M-size missions. This spectropolarimeter could also be installed on a large UV and visible observatory (e.g. NASA's LUVOIR project) within a suite of instruments.