• We determine the intrinsic, 3-dimensional shape distribution of star-forming galaxies at 0<z<2.5, as inferred from their observed projected axis ratios. In the present-day universe star-forming galaxies of all masses 1e9 - 1e11 Msol are predominantly thin, nearly oblate disks, in line with previous studies. We now extend this to higher redshifts, and find that among massive galaxies (M* > 1e10 Msol) disks are the most common geometric shape at all z < 2. Lower-mass galaxies at z>1 possess a broad range of geometric shapes: the fraction of elongated (prolate) galaxies increases toward higher redshifts and lower masses. Galaxies with stellar mass 1e9 Msol (1e10 Msol) are a mix of roughly equal numbers of elongated and disk galaxies at z~1 (z~2). This suggests that galaxies in this mass range do not yet have disks that are sustained over many orbital periods, implying that galaxies with present-day stellar mass comparable to that of the Milky Way typically first formed such sustained stellar disks at redshift z~1.5-2. Combined with constraints on the evolution of the star formation rate density and the distribution of star formation over galaxies with different masses, our findings imply that, averaged over cosmic time, the majority of stars formed in disks.
  • We analyze the star-forming and structural properties of 45 massive (log(M/Msun)>10) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2<z<3 to explore whether they are progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z~2. The optical/NIR and far-IR Spitzer/Herschel colors indicate that most compact SFGs are heavily obscured. Nearly half (47%) host an X-ray bright AGN. In contrast, only about 10% of other massive galaxies at that time host AGNs. Compact SFGs have centrally-concentrated light profiles and spheroidal morphologies similar to quiescent galaxies, and are thus strikingly different from other SFGs. Most compact SFGs lie either within the SFR-M main sequence (65%) or below (30%), on the expected evolutionary path towards quiescent galaxies. These results show conclusively that galaxies become more compact before they lose their gas and dust, quenching star formation. Using extensive HST photometry from CANDELS and grism spectroscopy from the 3D-HST survey, we model their stellar populations with either exponentially declining (tau) star formation histories (SFHs) or physically-motivated SFHs drawn from semi-analytic models (SAMs). SAMs predict longer formation timescales and older ages ~2 Gyr, which are nearly twice as old as the estimates of the tau models. While both models yield good SED fits, SAM SFHs better match the observed slope and zero point of the SFR-M main sequence. Some low-mass compact SFGs (log(M/Msun)=10-10.6) have younger ages but lower sSFRs than that of more massive galaxies, suggesting that the low-mass galaxies reach the red sequence faster. If the progenitors of compact SFGs are extended SFGs, state-of-the-art SAMs show that mergers and disk instabilities are both able to shrink galaxies, but disk instabilities are more frequent (60% versus 40%) and form more concentrated galaxies. We confirm this result via high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations.
  • We present the redshift lower limit of z>0.6035 for the very-high-energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) emitting blazar PKS 1424+240 (PG 1424+240). This limit is inferred from Lyman beta and gamma absorption observed in the far-ultraviolet spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. No VHE-detected blazar has shown solid spectroscopic evidence of being more distant. At this distance, VHE observations by VERITAS are shown to sample historically large gamma-ray opacity values at 500 GeV, extending beyond tau=4 for low-level models of the extragalactic background light (EBL) and beyond tau=5 for high-levels. The majority of the z=0.6035 absorption-corrected VHE spectrum appears to exhibit a lower flux than an extrapolation of the contemporaneous LAT power-law fit beyond 100 GeV. However, the highest energy VERITAS point is the only point showing agreement with this extrapolation, possibly implying the overestimation of the gamma-ray opacity or the onset of an unexpected VHE spectral feature. A curved log parabola is favored when fitting the full range of gamma-ray data (0.5 to 500 GeV). While fitting the absorption-corrected VHE data alone results in a harder differential power law than that from the full range, the indices derived using three EBL models are consistent with the physically motivated limit set by Fermi acceleration processes.
  • We present the first results from the new Bolshoi N-body cosmological LCDM simulation that uses cosmological parameters favored by current observations. The Bolshoi simulation was done in a volume 250Mpc on a side using 8billion particles with mass and force resolution adequate to follow subhalos down to a completeness limit of Vcirc=50km/ s circular velocity. Using excellent statistics of halos and subhalos (10M at every moment and 50M over the whole history) we present accurate approximations for statistics such as the halo mass function, the concentrations for distinct halos and subhalos, abundance of halos as function of their circular velocity, the abundance and the spatial distribution of subhalos. We find that at high redshifts the concentration falls to a minimum of about 3.8 and then rises slightly for higher values of halo mass. We find that while the Sheth-Tormen approximation for the mass function of halos found by spherical overdensity is accurate at low redshifts, it over-predicts the abundance of halos by nearly an order of magnitude by z=10. We find that the number of subhalos scales with the circular velocity of the host halo as Vhost**0.5, and that subhalos have nearly the same radial distribution as dark matter particles at radii 0.3-2 times the host halo virial radius. The subhalo velocity function n(>V) behaves as V**(-3). We give normalization of this relation for different masses and redshifts. Finally, we use an abundance-matching procedure to assign r-band luminosities to dark matter halos as a function of halo Vcirc, and find that the luminosity-velocity relation is in remarkably good agreement with the observed Tully-Fisher relation for galaxies in the range 50-200km/s.
  • We present the quantitative rest-frame B morphological evolution and galaxy merger fractions at 0.2 < z < 1.2 as observed by the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). We use the Gini coefficent and M_20 to identify major mergers and classify galaxy morphology for a volume-limited sample of 3009 galaxies brighter than 0.4 L_B^*, assuming pure luminosity evolution of 1.3 M_B per unit redshift. We find that the merger fraction remains roughly constant at 10 +/- 2% for 0.2 < z < 1.2. The fraction of E/S0/Sa increases from 21+/- 3% at z ~ 1.1 to 44 +/- 9% at z ~ 0.3, while the fraction of Sb-Ir decreases from 64 +/- 6% at z ~ 1.1 to 47 +/- 9% at z ~ 0.3. The majority of z < 1.2 Spitzer MIPS 24 micron sources with L(IR) > 10^11 L_sun are disk galaxies, and only ~ 15% are classified as major merger candidates. Edge-on and dusty disk galaxies (Sb-Ir) are almost a third of the red sequence at z ~ 1.1, while E/S0/Sa makeup over 90% of the red sequence at z ~ 0.3. Approximately 2% of our full sample are red mergers. We conclude (1) the galaxy merger rate does not evolve strongly between 0.2 < z < 1.2; (2) the decrease in the volume-averaged star-formation rate density since z ~ 1 is a result of declining star-formation in disk galaxies rather than a disappearing population of major mergers; (3) the build-up of the red sequence at z < 1 can be explained by a doubling in the number of spheroidal galaxies since z ~ 1.2.
  • We apply a new approach to quantifying galaxy morphology and identifying galaxy mergers to the rest-frame far-ultraviolet images of 82 z ~ 4 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and 55 1.2 < z < 1.8 emission-line galaxies in the GOODS and Ultra Deep Fields. We compare the distributions of the Gini coefficient (G), second-order moment of the brightest 20% of galaxy light (M20), and concentration (C) for high-redshift and low-redshift galaxies with average signal to noise per pixel > 2.5 and Petrosian radii > 0.3 arcsec. Ten of the 82 LBGs have M20 >= -1.1 and possess bright double or multiple nuclei, implying a major-merger fraction of star-forming galaxies ~ 10-25% at M_{FUV} < -20, depending on our incompleteness corrections. Galaxies with bulge-like morphologies (G >= 0.55, M20 < -1.6) make up ~ 30% of the z ~ 4 LBG sample, while the remaining ~ 50% have G and M20 values higher than expected for smooth bulges and disks and may be star-forming disks, minor-mergers or post-mergers. The star-forming z ~ 1.5 galaxy sample has a morphological distribution which is similar to the UDF z ~ 4 LBGs, with an identical fraction of major-merger candidates but fewer spheroids. The observed morphological distributions are roughly consistent with current hierarchical model predictions for the major-merger rates and minor-merger induced starbursts at z ~ 1.5 and ~4. We also examine the rest-frame FUV-NUV and FUV-B colors as a function of morphology and find no strong correlations at either epoch.