• Recent ALMA observations present mounting evidence for the presence of exocometary gas released within Kuiper belt analogues around nearby main sequence stars. This represents a unique opportunity to study their ice reservoir at the younger ages when volatile delivery to planets is most likely to occur. We here present the detection of CO J=2-1 emission co-located with dust emission from the cometary belt in the 440 Myr-old Fomalhaut system. Through spectro-spatial filtering, we achieve a 5.4$\sigma$ detection and determine that the ring's sky-projected rotation axis matches that of the star. The CO mass derived ($0.65-42 \times10^{-7}$ M$_{\oplus}$) is the lowest of any circumstellar disk detected to date, and must be of exocometary origin. Using a steady state model, we estimate the CO+CO$_2$ mass fraction of exocomets around Fomalhaut to be between 4.6-76%, consistent with Solar System comets and the two other belts known to host exocometary gas. This is the first indication of a similarity in cometary compositions across planetary systems that may be linked to their formation scenario and is consistent with direct ISM inheritance. In addition, we find tentative evidence that $(49\pm 27)$% of the detected flux originates from a region near the eccentric belt's pericentre. If confirmed, the latter may be explained through a recent impact event or CO pericentre glow due to exocometary release within a steady state collisional cascade. In the latter scenario, we show how the azimuthal dependence of the CO release rate leads to asymmetries in gas observations of eccentric exocometary belts.
  • HD 142527A is one of the most studied Herbig Ae/Be stars with a transitional disk, as it has the largest imaged gap in any protoplanetary disk: the gas is cleared from 30 to 90 AU. The HD142527 system is also unique in that it has a stellar companion with a small mass compared to the mass of the primary star. This factor of ~20 in mass ratio between the two objects makes this binary system different from any other YSO. The HD142527 system could therefore provide a valuable test bed. This low-mass stellar object may be responsible for both the gap and dust trapping observed by ALMA at longer distances. We observed this system with the NACO and GPI instruments using the aperture masking technique. Aperture masking is ideal for providing high dynamic range even at very small angular separations. We present the spectral energy distribution for HD142527A and B. Brightness of the companion is now known from the R band up to the M' band. We also followed the orbital motion of HD 142527B over a period of more than two years. The SED of the companion is compatible with a T=3000+/-100K object in addition to a 1700K blackbody environment (likely a circus-secondary disk). From evolution models, we find that it is compatible with an object of mass 0.13+/-0.03Msun, radius 0.90+/-0.15Rsun, and age $1.0^{+1.0}_{-0.75}$Myr. This age is significantly younger than the age previously estimated for HD142527A. Computations to constrain the orbital parameters found a semi major axis of $140^{+120}_{-70}$mas, an eccentricity of 0.5+/-0.2, an inclination of 125+/-15 degrees, and a position angle of the right ascending node of -5+/-40 degrees. Inclination and position angle of the ascending node are in agreement with an orbit coplanar with the inner disk, not coplanar with the outer disk. Despite its high eccentricity, it is unlikely that HD142527B is responsible for truncating the inner edge of the outer disk.
  • We describe a "super-Earth"-size ($2.30\pm0.15R_{\oplus}$) planet transiting an early K-type dwarf star in the Campaign 4 field observed by the K2 mission. The host star, EPIC 210363145, was identified as a member of the approximately 120-Myr-old Pleiades cluster based on its kinematics and photometric distance. It is rotationally variable and exhibits near-ultraviolet emission consistent with a Pleiades age, but its rotational period is ~20 d and its spectrum contains no H$\alpha$ emission nor the Li I absorption expected of Pleiades K dwarfs. Instead, the star is probably an interloper that is unaffiliated with the cluster, but younger (< 1 Gyr) than the typical field dwarf. We ruled out a false positive transit signal produced by confusion with a background eclipsing binary by adaptive optics imaging and a statistical calculation. Doppler radial velocity measurements limit the companion mass to <2 times that of Jupiter. Screening of the lightcurves of 1014 potential Pleiades candidate stars uncovered no additional planets. An injection-and-recovery experiment using the K2 Pleiades lightcurves with simulated planets, assuming a planet population like that in the Kepler prime field, predicts only 0.8-1.8 detections (vs. ~20 in an equivalent Kepler sample). The absence of Pleiades planet detections can be attributed to the much shorter monitoring time of K2 (80 days vs. 4 years), increased measurement noise due to spacecraft motion, and the intrinsic noisiness of the stars.
  • Directly detecting thermal emission from young extrasolar planets allows measurement of their atmospheric composition and luminosity, which is influenced by their formation mechanism. Using the Gemini Planet Imager, we discovered a planet orbiting the \$sim$20 Myr-old star 51 Eridani at a projected separation of 13 astronomical units. Near-infrared observations show a spectrum with strong methane and water vapor absorption. Modeling of the spectra and photometry yields a luminosity of L/LS=1.6-4.0 x 10-6 and an effective temperature of 600-750 K. For this age and luminosity, "hot-start" formation models indicate a mass twice that of Jupiter. This planet also has a sufficiently low luminosity to be consistent with the "cold- start" core accretion process that may have formed Jupiter.
  • We report the discovery of a wide co-moving substellar companion to the nearby ($D=67.5\pm1.1$ pc) A3V star $\zeta$ Delphini based on imaging and follow-up spectroscopic observations obtained during the course of our Volume-limited A-Star (VAST) multiplicity survey. $\zeta$ Del was observed over a five-year baseline with adaptive optics, revealing the presence of a previously-unresolved companion with a proper motion consistent with that of the A-type primary. The age of the $\zeta$ Del system was estimated as $525\pm125$ Myr based on the position of the primary on the colour-magnitude and temperature-luminosity diagrams. Using intermediate-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, the spectrum of $\zeta$ Del B is shown to be consistent with a mid-L dwarf (L$5\pm2$), at a temperature of $1650\pm200$ K. Combining the measured near-infrared magnitude of $\zeta$ Del B with the estimated temperature leads to a model-dependent mass estimate of $50\pm15$ M$_{\rm Jup}$, corresponding to a mass ratio of $q=0.019\pm0.006$. At a projected separation of $910\pm14$ au, $\zeta$ Del B is among the most widely-separated and extreme-mass ratio substellar companions to a main-sequence star resolved to-date, providing a rare empirical constraint of the formation of low-mass ratio companions at extremely wide separations.
  • We present an analysis of the orbital motion of the four sub-stellar objects orbiting HR8799. Our study relies on the published astrometric history of this system augmented with an epoch obtained with the Project 1640 coronagraph + Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) installed at the Palomar Hale telescope. We first focus on the intricacies associated with astrometric estimation using the combination of an Extreme Adaptive Optics system (PALM-3000), a coronagraph and an IFS. We introduce two new algorithms. The first one retrieves the stellar focal plane position when the star is occulted by a coronagraphic stop. The second one yields precise astrometric and spectro-photometric estimates of faint point sources even when they are initially buried in the speckle noise. The second part of our paper is devoted to studying orbital motion in this system. In order to complement the orbital architectures discussed in the literature, we determine an ensemble of likely Keplerian orbits for HR8799bcde, using a Bayesian analysis with maximally vague priors regarding the overall configuration of the system. While the astrometric history is currently too scarce to formally rule out coplanarity, HR8799d appears to be misaligned with respect to the most likely planes of HR8799bce orbits. This misalignment is sufficient to question the strictly coplanar assumption made by various authors when identifying a Laplace resonance as a potential architecture. Finally, we establish a high likelihood that HR8799de have dynamical masses below 13 M_Jup using a loose dynamical survival argument based on geometric close encounters. We illustrate how future dynamical analyses will further constrain dynamical masses in the entire system.
  • With a combination of adaptive optics imaging and a multi-epoch common proper motion search, we have conducted a large volume-limited (D $\le$ 75 pc) multiplicity survey of A-type stars, sensitive to companions beyond 30 au. The sample for the Volume-limited A-STar (VAST) survey consists of 435 A-type stars: 363 stars were observed with adaptive optics, 228 stars were searched for wide common proper motion companions and 156 stars were measured with both techniques. The projected separation coverage of the VAST survey extends from 30 to 45,000 au. A total of 137 stellar companions were resolved, including 64 new detections from the VAST survey, and the companion star fraction, projected separation distribution and mass ratio distribution were measured. The separation distribution forms a log-normal distribution similar to the solar-type binary distribution, but with a peak shifted to a significantly wider value of 387 (+132,-98) au. Integrating the fit to the distribution over the 30 to 10,000 au observed range, the companion star fraction for A-type stars is estimated as 33.8%+-2.6%. The mass ratio distribution of closer (<125 au) binaries is distinct from that of wider systems, with a flat distribution for close systems and a distribution that tends towards smaller mass ratios for wider binaries. Combining this result with previous spectroscopic surveys of A-type stars gives an estimate of the total companion star fraction of 68.9%+-7.0%. The most complete assessment of higher order multiples was estimated from the 156-star subset of the VAST sample with both adaptive optics and common proper motion measurements, combined with a literature search for companions, yielding a lower limit on the frequency of single, binary, triple, quadruple and quintuple A-type star systems of 56.4 (-4.0,+3.8), 32.1 (-3.5,+3.9), 9.0 (-1.8,+2.8), 1.9 (-0.6,+1.8) and 0.6 (-0.2,+1.4) per cent, respectively.
  • We report on the successful science verification phase of a new observing mode at the Keck interferometer, which provides a line-spread function width and sampling of 150km/s at K'-band, at a current limiting magnitude of K'~7mag with spatial resolution of lam/2B ~2.7mas and a measured differential phase stability of unprecedented precision (3mrad at K=5mag, which represents 3uas on sky or a centroiding precision of 10^-3). The scientific potential of this mode is demonstrated by the presented observations of the circumstellar disk of the evolved Be-star 48Lib. In addition to indirect methods such as multi-wavelength spectroscopy and polaritmetry, the here described spectro-interferometric astrometry provides a new tool to directly constrain the radial density structure in the disk. We resolve for the first time several Pfund emission lines, in addition to BrGam, in a single interferometric spectrum, and with adequate spatial and spectral resolution and precision to analyze the radial disk structure in 48Lib. The data suggest that the continuum and Pf-emission originates in significantly more compact regions, inside of the BrGam emission zone. Thus, spectro-interferometric astrometry opens the opportunity to directly connect the different observed line profiles of BrGam and Pfund in the total and correlated flux to different disk radii. The gravitational potential of a rotationally flattened Be star is expected to induce a one-armed density perturbation in the circumstellar disk. Such a slowly rotating disk oscillation has been used to explain the well known periodic V/R spectral profile variability in these stars, as well as the observed V/R cycle phase shifts between different disk emission lines. The differential line properties and linear constraints set by our data lend support to the existence of a radius-dependent disk density perturbation.
  • We present near-infrared observations of T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be stars with a spatial resolution of a few milli-arcseconds and a spectral resolution of ~2000. Our observations spatially resolve gas and dust in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, and spectrally resolve broad-linewidth emission from the Brackett gamma transition of hydrogen gas. We use the technique of spectro-astrometry to determine centroids of different velocity components of this gaseous emission at a precision orders of magnitude better than the angular resolution. In all sources, we find the gaseous emission to be more compact than or distributed on similar spatial scales to the dust emission. We attempt to fit the data with models including both dust and Brackett gamma-emitting gas, and we consider both disk and infall/outflow morphologies for the gaseous matter. In most cases where we can distinguish between these two models, the data show a preference for infall/outflow models. In all cases, our data appear consistent with the presence of some gas at stellocentric radii of ~0.01 AU. Our findings support the hypothesis that Brackett gamma emission generally traces magnetospherically driven accretion and/or outflows in young star/disk systems.
  • We classify 329 late-type giants within 1 parsec of Sgr A*, using the adaptive optics integral field spectrometer SINFONI on the VLT. These observations represent the deepest spectroscopic data set so far obtained for the Galactic Center, reaching a 50% completeness threshold at the approximate magnitude of the helium-burning red clump (Ks ~ 15.5 mag.). Combining our spectroscopic results with NaCo H and Ks photometry, we construct an observed Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, which we quantitatively compare to theoretical distributions of various star formation histories of the inner Galaxy, using a chi-squared analysis. Our best-fit model corresponds to continuous star formation over the last 12 Gyr with a top-heavy initial mass function (IMF). The similarity of this IMF to the IMF observed for the most recent epoch of star formation is intriguing and perhaps suggests a connection between recent star formation and the stars formed throughout the history of the Galactic Center.
  • We use the Chandra X-ray Observatory to analyze interactions of the blast wave and the inhomogeneous interstellar medium on the western limb of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. This field of view includes an initial interaction between the blast wave and a large cloud, as well as the encounter of the shock front and the shell that surrounds the cavity of the supernova progenitor. Uniquely, the X-rays directly trace the shock front in the dense cloud, where we measure temperature kT = 0.03 keV. We find kT~0.2 keV in regions where reflected shocks further heat previously-shocked material. Applying one-dimensional models to these interactions, we determine the original blast wave velocity v_bw~330 km/s in the ambient medium. We do not detect strong evidence for instabilities or non-equilibrium conditions on the arcsecond scales we resolve. These sensitive, high-resolution data indicate no exceptional abundance variations in this region of the Cygnus Loop.
  • We present millimeter wavelength detections of three faint sources that are most likely high-redshift starburst galaxies. For one of the sources, which was previously discovered with SCUBA at 850 mu m, we present a detection with the IRAM interferometer at 240 GHz (1.25 mm) that shows the object unresolved at an angular resolution of 2.''5, and coincident within 1'' with a radio source and a galaxy detected in the near-infrared. The two other sources were discovered in a deep 250 GHz (1.2 mm) survey with the Max-Planck Millimeter Bolometer (MAMBO) array at the IRAM 30m telescope. Both have fluxes of ~4 mJy and radio counterparts with a 1.4 GHz flux density of ~75 muJy. Their radio-to-mm flux ratios suggest redshifts larger than 2. Both sources are faint in the optical and near-infrared, one showing a 20.5 mag K-band counterpart. From our data and that available in the literature, we estimate the redshift distribution of twenty-two faint mm and sub-mm sources and conclude that the majority of them are likely to be at z>2.