• Broad absorption lines (BALs) in the spectra of quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) originate from outflowing winds along our line of sight; winds are thought to originate from the inner regions of the QSO accretion disk, close to the central supermassive black hole (SMBH). Winds likely play a role in galaxy evolution and aid the accretion mechanism onto the SMBH. BAL equivalent widths can change on typical timescales from months to years; such variability is generally attributed to changes in the covering factor and/or in the ionization level of the gas. We investigate BAL variability, focusing on BAL disappearance. We analyze multi-epoch spectra of more than 1500 QSOs -the largest sample ever used for such a study- observed by different programs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-I/II/III (SDSS), and search for disappearing C IV BALs. The spectra rest-frame time baseline ranges from 0.28 to 4.9 yr; the source redshifts range from 1.68 to 4.27. We detect 73 disappearing BALs in the spectra of 67 sources. This corresponds to 3.9% of disappearing BALs, and 5.1% of our BAL QSOs exhibit at least one disappearing BAL. We estimate the average lifetime of a BAL along our line of sight (~ 80-100 yr), which appears consistent with the accretion disk orbital time at distances where winds are thought to originate. We inspect properties of the disappearing BALs and compare them to the properties of our main sample. We also investigate the existence of a correlation in the variability of multiple troughs in the same spectrum, and find it persistent at large velocity offsets between BAL pairs, suggesting that a mechanism extending on a global scale is necessary to explain the phenomenon. We select a more reliable sample of disappearing BALs following Filiz Ak et al. (2012), where a subset of our sample was analyzed, and compare the findings from the two works, obtaining generally consistent results.
  • Previous studies suggest that the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) may be fundamentally related to host-galaxy stellar mass ($M_\star$). To investigate this SMBH growth-$M_\star$ relation in detail, we calculate long-term SMBH accretion rate as a function of $M_\star$ and redshift [$\overline{\rm BHAR}(M_\star, z)$] over ranges of $\log(M_\star/M_\odot)=\text{9.5--12}$ and $z=\text{0.4--4}$. Our $\overline{\rm BHAR}(M_\star, z)$ is constrained by high-quality survey data (GOODS-South, GOODS-North, and COSMOS), and by the stellar mass function and the X-ray luminosity function. At a given $M_\star$, $\overline{\rm BHAR}$ is higher at high redshift. This redshift dependence is stronger in more massive systems (for $\log(M_\star/M_\odot)\approx 11.5$, $\overline{\rm BHAR}$ is three decades higher at $z=4$ than at $z=0.5$), possibly due to AGN feedback. Our results indicate that the ratio between $\overline{\rm BHAR}$ and average star formation rate ($\overline{\rm SFR}$) rises toward high $M_\star$ at a given redshift. This $\overline{\rm BHAR}/\overline{\rm SFR}$ dependence on $M_\star$ does not support the scenario that SMBH and galaxy growth are in lockstep. We calculate SMBH mass history [$M_{\rm BH}(z)$] based on our $\overline{\rm BHAR}(M_\star, z)$ and the $M_\star(z)$ from the literature, and find that the $M_{\rm BH}$-$M_\star$ relation has weak redshift evolution since $z\approx 2$. The $M_{\rm BH}/M_\star$ ratio is higher toward massive galaxies: it rises from $\approx 1/5000$ at $\log M_\star\lesssim 10.5$ to $\approx 1/500$ at $\log M_\star \gtrsim 11.2$. Our predicted $M_{\rm BH}/M_\star$ ratio at high $M_\star$ is similar to that observed in local giant ellipticals, suggesting that SMBH growth from mergers is unlikely to dominate over growth from accretion.
  • We investigate the dependence of black-hole accretion rate (BHAR) on host-galaxy star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass ($M_*$) in the CANDELS/GOODS-South field in the redshift range of $0.5\leq z < 2.0$. Our sample consists of $\approx 18000$ galaxies, allowing us to probe galaxies with $0.1 \lesssim \mathrm{SFR} \lesssim 100\ M_\odot\ \mathrm{yr}^{-1}$ and/or $10^8 \lesssim M_* \lesssim 10^{11}\ M_{\odot}$. We use sample-mean BHAR to approximate long-term average BHAR. Our sample-mean BHARs are derived from the $Chandra$ Deep Field-South 7 Ms observations, while the SFRs and $M_*$ have been estimated by the CANDELS team through SED fitting. The average BHAR is correlated positively with both SFR and $M_*$, and the BHAR-SFR and BHAR-$M_*$ relations can both be described acceptably by linear models with a slope of unity. However, BHAR appears to be correlated more strongly with $M_*$ than SFR. This result indicates that $M_*$ is the primary host-galaxy property related to black-hole growth, and the apparent BHAR-SFR relation is largely a secondary effect due to the star-forming main sequence. Among our sources, massive galaxies ($M_* \gtrsim 10^{10} M_{\odot}$) have significantly higher BHAR/SFR ratios than less-massive galaxies, indicating the former have higher black-hole fueling efficiency and/or higher SMBH occupation fraction than the latter. Our results can naturally explain the observed proportionality between $M_{\rm BH}$ and $M_*$ for local giant ellipticals, and suggest their $M_{\rm BH}/M_*$ is higher than that of local star-forming galaxies. Among local star-forming galaxies, massive systems might have higher $M_{\rm BH}/M_*$ compared to dwarfs.
  • We present a sample of 10 low-mass active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the 40-month NuSTAR serendipitous survey. The sample is selected to have robust NuSTAR detections at $3 - 24$~keV, to be at $z < 0.3$, and to have optical r-band magnitudes at least 0.5~mag fainter than an $L_\star$ galaxy at its redshift. The median values of absolute magnitude, stellar mass and 2--10 X-ray luminosity of our sample are $\langle M_r\rangle = -20.03$, $\langle M_\star\rangle = 4.6\times10^{9}M_\odot$, and $\langle L_{2-10\mathrm{keV}}\rangle = 3.1\times10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$, respectively. Five objects have detectable broad H$\alpha$ emission in their optical spectra, indicating black-hole masses of $(1.1-10.4)\times 10^6 M_\odot$. We find that $30^{+17}_{-10}\%$ of the galaxies in our sample do not show AGN-like optical narrow emission lines, and one of the ten galaxies in our sample, J115851+4243.2, shows evidence for heavy X-ray absorption. This result implies that a non-negligible fraction of low-mass galaxies might harbor accreting massive black holes that are missed by optical spectroscopic surveys and $<10$ keV X-ray surveys. The mid-IR colors of our sample also indicate these optically normal low-mass AGNs cannot be efficiently identified with typical AGN selection criteria based on WISE colors. While the hard ($>10$ keV) X-ray selected low-mass AGN sample size is still limited, our results show that sensitive NuSTAR observations are capable of probing faint hard X-ray emission originating from the nuclei of low-mass galaxies out to moderate redshift ($z<0.3$), thus providing a critical step in understanding AGN demographics in low-mass galaxies.
  • We present spatially-resolved Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) 870 $\mu$m dust continuum maps of six massive, compact, dusty star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at $z\sim2.5$. These galaxies are selected for their small rest-frame optical sizes ($r_{\rm e, F160W}\sim1.6$ kpc) and high stellar-mass densities that suggest that they are direct progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at $z\sim2$. The deep observations yield high far-infrared (FIR) luminosities of L$_{\rm IR}=10^{12.3-12.8}$ L$_{\odot}$ and star formation rates (SFRs) of SFR$=200-700$ M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$, consistent with those of typical star-forming "main sequence" galaxies. The high-spatial resolution (FWHM$\sim$0.12"-0.18") ALMA and HST photometry are combined to construct deconvolved, mean radial profiles of their stellar mass and (UV+IR) SFR. We find that the dusty, nuclear IR-SFR overwhelmingly dominates the bolometric SFR up to $r\sim5$ kpc, by a factor of over 100$\times$ from the unobscured UV-SFR. Furthermore, the effective radius of the mean SFR profile ($r_{\rm e, SFR}\sim1$ kpc) is $\sim$30% smaller than that of the stellar mass profile. The implied structural evolution, if such nuclear starburst last for the estimated gas depletion time of $\Delta t=\pm100$ Myr, is a 4$\times$ increase of the stellar mass density within the central 1 kpc and a 1.6$\times$ decrease of the half-mass radius. This structural evolution fully supports dissipation-driven, formation scenarios in which strong nuclear starbursts transform larger, star-forming progenitors into compact quiescent galaxies.
  • We present results from the largest systematic investigation of broad absorption line (BAL) acceleration to date. We use spectra of 140 quasars from three Sloan Digital Sky Survey programs to search for global velocity offsets in BALs over timescales of ~2.5-5.5 years in the quasar rest frame. We carefully select acceleration candidates by requiring monolithic velocity shifts over the entire BAL trough, avoiding BALs with velocity shifts that might be caused by profile variability. The CIV BALs of two quasars show velocity shifts consistent with the expected signatures of BAL acceleration, and the BAL of one quasar shows a velocity-shift signature of deceleration. In our two acceleration candidates, we see evidence that the magnitude of the acceleration is not constant over time; the magnitudes of the change in acceleration for both acceleration candidates are difficult to produce with a standard disk-wind model or via geometric projection effects. We measure upper limits to acceleration and deceleration for 76 additional BAL troughs and find that the majority of BALs are stable to within about 3% of their mean velocities. The lack of widespread acceleration/deceleration could indicate that the gas producing most BALs is located at large radii from the central black hole and/or is not currently strongly interacting with ambient material within the host galaxy along our line of sight.
  • We investigate the dependence on data quality of quasar properties measured from the CIV emission line region at high redshifts. Our measurements come from 32 epochs of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Reverberation Mapping Project spectroscopic observations of 482 z>1.46 quasars. We compare the differences between measurements made from the single-epoch and coadded spectra, focusing on the CIV emission line because of its importance for studies of high-redshift quasar demographics and physical properties, including black hole masses. In addition to statistical errors increasing (by factors of ~2-4), we find increasing systematic offsets with decreasing S/N. The systematic difference (measurement uncertainty) in our lowest S/N (<5) subsample between the single-epoch and coadded spectrum (i) CIV equivalent width is 17A (31A), (ii) centroid wavelength is <1A (2A), and fractional velocity widths, Delta V/V, characterized by (iii) the line dispersion, sigma_l, is 0.104 (0.12), and (iv) the mean absolute deviation (MAD) is 0.072 (0.11). These remain smaller than the 1-sigma measurement uncertainties for all subsamples considered. The MAD is found to be the most robust line-width characterization. Offsets in the CIV full-width at half maximum (FWHM) velocity width and the CIV profile characterized by FWHM/sigma_l are only smaller than the statistical uncertainties when S/N>10, although offsets in lower S/N spectra exceed the statistical uncertainties by only a factor of ~1.5. Characterizing the CIV line profile by the kurtosis is the least robust property investigated, as the median systematic coadded--single-epoch measurement differences are larger than the statistical uncertainties for all S/N subsamples.
  • We study the evolution of the core (r<1 kpc) and effective (r<r_e) stellar-mass surface densities, in star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Since z=3, both populations occupy distinct, linear relations in log(Sigma_e) and log(Sigma_1) vs. log(M). These structural relations exhibit slopes and scatter that remain almost constant with time while their normalizations decline. For SFGs, the normalization declines by less than a factor of 2 from z=3, in both Sigma_e and Sigma_1. Such mild declines suggest that SFGs build dense cores by growing along these relations. We define this evolution as the structural main sequence (Sigma-MS). Quiescent galaxies follow different relations (Sigma^Q_e, Sigma^Q_1) off the Sigma-MS by having higher densities than SFGs of the same mass and redshift. The normalization of Sigma^Q_e declines by a factor of 10 since z=3, but only a factor of 2 in Sigma^Q_1. Thus, the common denominator for quiescent galaxies at all redshifts is the presence of a dense stellar core, and the formation of such cores in SFGs is the main requirement for quenching. Expressed in 2D as deviations off the SFR-MS and off Sigma^Q_1 at each redshift, the distribution of massive galaxies forms a universal, L-shaped sequence that relates two fundamental physical processes: compaction and quenching. Compaction is a process of substantial core-growth in SFGs relative to that in the Sigma-MS. This process increases the core-to-total mass and Sersic index, thereby, making compact SFGs. Quenching occurs once compact SFGs reach a maximum central density above Sigma^Q_1 > 9.5 M_sun/kpc^2. This threshold provides the most effective selection criterion to identify the star-forming progenitors of quiescent galaxies at all redshifts.
  • We report the discovery of rapid variations of a high-velocity CIV broad absorption line trough in the quasar SDSS J141007.74+541203.3. This object was intensively observed in 2014 as a part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project, during which 32 epochs of spectroscopy were obtained with the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey spectrograph. We observe significant (>4sigma) variability in the equivalent width of the broad (~4000 km/s wide) CIV trough on rest-frame timescales as short as 1.20 days (~29 hours), the shortest broad absorption line variability timescale yet reported. The equivalent width varied by ~10% on these short timescales, and by about a factor of two over the duration of the campaign. We evaluate several potential causes of the variability, concluding that the most likely cause is a rapid response to changes in the incident ionizing continuum. If the outflow is at a radius where the recombination rate is higher than the ionization rate, the timescale of variability places a lower limit on the density of the absorbing gas of n_e > 3.9 x 10^5 cm^-3. The broad absorption line variability characteristics of this quasar are consistent with those observed in previous studies of quasars, indicating that such short-term variability may in fact be common and thus can be used to learn about outflow characteristics and contributions to quasar/host-galaxy feedback scenarios.
  • We present Keck-I MOSFIRE spectroscopy in the Y and H bands of GDN-8231, a massive, compact, star-forming galaxy (SFG) at a redshift $z\sim1.7$. Its spectrum reveals both H$_{\alpha}$ and [NII] emission lines and strong Balmer absorption lines. The H$_{\alpha}$ and Spitzer MIPS 24 $\mu$m fluxes are both weak, thus indicating a low star formation rate of SFR $\lesssim5-10$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$. This, added to a relatively young age of $\sim700$ Myr measured from the absorption lines, provides the first direct evidence for a distant galaxy being caught in the act of rapidly shutting down its star formation. Such quenching allows GDN-8231 to become a compact, quiescent galaxy, similar to 3 other galaxies in our sample, by $z\sim1.5$. Moreover, the color profile of GDN-8231 shows a bluer center, consistent with the predictions of recent simulations for an early phase of inside-out quenching. Its line-of-sight velocity dispersion for the gas, $\sigma^{\rm{gas}}_{\!_{\rm LOS}}=127\pm32$ km s$^{-1}$, is nearly 40% smaller than that of its stars, $\sigma^{\star}_{\!_{\rm LOS}}=215\pm35$ km s$^{-1}$. High-resolution hydro-simulations of galaxies explain such apparently colder gas kinematics of up to a factor of $\sim1.5$ with rotating disks being viewed at different inclinations and/or centrally concentrated star-forming regions. A clear prediction is that their compact, quiescent descendants preserve some remnant rotation from their star-forming progenitors.
  • We study the relationship between the structure and star-formation rate (SFR) of X-ray selected low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the two Chandra Deep Fields, using Hubble Space Telescope imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and deep far-infrared maps from the PEP+GOODS-Herschel survey. We derive detailed distributions of structural parameters and FIR luminosities from carefully constructed control samples of galaxies, which we then compare to those of the AGNs. At z~1, AGNs show slightly diskier light profiles than massive inactive (non-AGN) galaxies, as well as modestly higher levels of gross galaxy disturbance (as measured by visual signatures of interactions and clumpy structure). In contrast, at z~2, AGNs show similar levels of galaxy disturbance as inactive galaxies, but display a red central light enhancement, which may arise due to a more pronounced bulge in AGN hosts or due to extinguished nuclear light. We undertake a number of tests of these alternatives, but our results do not strongly favour one interpretation over the other. The mean SFR and its distribution among AGNs and inactive galaxies are similar at z>1.5. At z<1, however, clear and significant enhancements are seen in the SFRs of AGNs with bulge-dominated light profiles. These trends suggest an evolution in the relation between nuclear activity and host properties with redshift, towards a minor role for mergers and interactions at z>1.5.
  • We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line-of-sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines-of-sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.
  • We present Keck-I MOSFIRE near-infrared spectroscopy for a sample of 13 compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at redshift $2\leq z \leq2.5$ with star formation rates of SFR$\sim$100M$_{\odot}$ y$^{-1}$ and masses of log(M/M$_{\odot}$)$\sim10.8$. Their high integrated gas velocity dispersions of $\sigma_{\rm{int}}$=230$^{+40}_{-30}$ km s$^{-1}$, as measured from emission lines of H$_{\alpha}$ and [OIII], and the resultant M$_{\star}-\sigma_{\rm{int}}$ relation and M$_{\star}$$-$M$_{\rm{dyn}}$ all match well to those of compact quiescent galaxies at $z\sim2$, as measured from stellar absorption lines. Since log(M$_{\star}$/M$_{\rm{dyn}}$)$=-0.06\pm0.2$ dex, these compact SFGs appear to be dynamically relaxed and more evolved, i.e., more depleted in gas and dark matter ($<$13$^{+17}_{-13}$\%) than their non-compact SFG counterparts at the same epoch. Without infusion of external gas, depletion timescales are short, less than $\sim$300 Myr. This discovery adds another link to our new dynamical chain of evidence that compact SFGs at $z\gtrsim2$ are already losing gas to become the immediate progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies by $z\sim2$.
  • We analyze the star-forming and structural properties of 45 massive (log(M/Msun)>10) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2<z<3 to explore whether they are progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z~2. The optical/NIR and far-IR Spitzer/Herschel colors indicate that most compact SFGs are heavily obscured. Nearly half (47%) host an X-ray bright AGN. In contrast, only about 10% of other massive galaxies at that time host AGNs. Compact SFGs have centrally-concentrated light profiles and spheroidal morphologies similar to quiescent galaxies, and are thus strikingly different from other SFGs. Most compact SFGs lie either within the SFR-M main sequence (65%) or below (30%), on the expected evolutionary path towards quiescent galaxies. These results show conclusively that galaxies become more compact before they lose their gas and dust, quenching star formation. Using extensive HST photometry from CANDELS and grism spectroscopy from the 3D-HST survey, we model their stellar populations with either exponentially declining (tau) star formation histories (SFHs) or physically-motivated SFHs drawn from semi-analytic models (SAMs). SAMs predict longer formation timescales and older ages ~2 Gyr, which are nearly twice as old as the estimates of the tau models. While both models yield good SED fits, SAM SFHs better match the observed slope and zero point of the SFR-M main sequence. Some low-mass compact SFGs (log(M/Msun)=10-10.6) have younger ages but lower sSFRs than that of more massive galaxies, suggesting that the low-mass galaxies reach the red sequence faster. If the progenitors of compact SFGs are extended SFGs, state-of-the-art SAMs show that mergers and disk instabilities are both able to shrink galaxies, but disk instabilities are more frequent (60% versus 40%) and form more concentrated galaxies. We confirm this result via high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations.
  • Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) occur in galaxies in which supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are growing substantially through rapid accretion of gas. Many popular models of the co-evolutionary growth of galaxies and SMBHs predict that QSOs are also sites of substantial recent star formation, mediated by important processes, such as major mergers, which rapidly transform the nature of galaxies. A detailed study of the star-forming properties of QSOs is a critical test of such models. We present a far-infrared Herschel/PACS study of the mean star formation rate (SFR) of a sample of spectroscopically observed QSOs to z~2 from the COSMOS extragalactic survey. This is the largest sample to date of moderately luminous AGNs studied using uniform, deep far-infrared photometry. We study trends of the mean SFR with redshift, black hole mass, nuclear bolometric luminosity and specific accretion rate (Eddington ratio). To minimize systematics, we have undertaken a uniform determination of SMBH properties, as well as an analysis of important selection effects within spectroscopic QSO samples that influence the interpretation of SFR trends. We find that the mean SFRs of these QSOs are consistent with those of normal massive star-forming galaxies with a fixed scaling between SMBH and galaxy mass at all redshifts. No strong enhancement in SFR is found even among the most rapidly accreting systems, at odds with several co-evolutionary models. Finally, we consider the qualitative effects on mean SFR trends from different assumptions about the star-forming properties of QSO hosts and redshift evolution of the SMBH-galaxy relationship. While limited currently by uncertainties, valuable constraints on AGN-galaxy co-evolution can emerge from our approach.
  • The "Cosmic Evolution Survey" (COSMOS) enables the study of the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) because of the deep coverage and rich sampling of frequencies from X-ray to radio. Here we present a SED catalog of 413 X-ray (\xmm) selected type 1 (emission line FWHM$>2000$ km s$^{-1}$) AGN with Magellan, SDSS or VLT spectrum. The SEDs are corrected for the Galactic extinction, for broad emission line contributions, constrained variability, and for host galaxy contribution. We present the mean SED and the dispersion SEDs after the above corrections in the rest frame 1.4 GHz to 40 keV, and show examples of the variety of SEDs encountered. In the near-infrared to optical (rest frame $\sim 8\mu m$-- 4000\AA), the photometry is complete for the whole sample and the mean SED is derived from detections only. Reddening and host galaxy contamination could account for a large fraction of the observed SED variety. The SEDs are all available on-line.
  • Bolometric luminosities and Eddington ratios of both X-ray selected broad-line (Type-1) and narrow-line (Type-2) AGN from the XMM-Newton survey in the COSMOS field are presented. The sample is composed by 929 AGN (382 Type-1 AGN and 547 Type-2 AGN) and it covers a wide range of redshifts, X-ray luminosities and absorbing column densities. About 65% of the sources are spectroscopically identified as either Type-1 or Type-2 AGN (83% and 52% respectively), while accurate photometric redshifts are available for the rest of the sample. The study of such a large sample of X-ray selected AGN with a high quality multi-wavelength coverage from the far-infrared (now with the inclusion of Herschel data at 100 micron and 160 micron) to the optical-UV allows us to obtain accurate estimates of bolometric luminosities, bolometric corrections and Eddington ratios. The kbol-Lbol relations derived in the present work are calibrated for the first time against a sizable AGN sample, and rely on observed redshifts, X-ray luminosities and column density distributions. We find that kbol is significantly lower at high Lbol with respect to previous estimates by Marconi et al. (2004) and Hopkins et al. (2007). Black hole masses and Eddington ratios are available for 170 Type-1 AGN, while black hole masses for Type-2 AGN are computed for 481 objects using the black hole mass-stellar mass relation and the morphological information. We confirm a trend between kbol and lambda_Edd, with lower hard X-ray bolometric corrections at lower Eddington ratios for both Type-1 and Type-2 AGN. We find that, on average, Eddington ratio increases with redshift for all Types of AGN at any given Mbh, while no clear evolution with redshift is seen at any given Lbol.
  • Spitzer IRAC selection is a powerful tool for identifying luminous AGN. For deep IRAC data, however, the AGN selection wedges currently in use are heavily contaminated by star-forming galaxies, especially at high redshift. Using the large samples of luminous AGN and high-redshift star-forming galaxies in COSMOS, we redefine the AGN selection criteria for use in deep IRAC surveys. The new IRAC criteria are designed to be both highly complete and reliable, and incorporate the best aspects of the current AGN selection wedges and of infrared power-law selection while excluding high redshift star-forming galaxies selected via the BzK, DRG, LBG, and SMG criteria. At QSO-luminosities of log L(2-10 keV) (ergs/s) > 44, the new IRAC criteria recover 75% of the hard X-ray and IRAC-detected XMM-COSMOS sample, yet only 38% of the IRAC AGN candidates have X-ray counterparts, a fraction that rises to 52% in regions with Chandra exposures of 50-160 ks. X-ray stacking of the individually X-ray non-detected AGN candidates leads to a hard X-ray signal indicative of heavily obscured to mildly Compton-thick obscuration (log N_H (cm^-2) = 23.5 +/- 0.4). While IRAC selection recovers a substantial fraction of luminous unobscured and obscured AGN, it is incomplete to low-luminosity and host-dominated AGN.
  • We present a rest-frame spectral stacking analysis of ~1000 X-ray sources detected in the XMM-COSMOS field in order to investigate the iron K line properties of active galaxies beyond redshift z~1. In Type I AGN that have a typical X-ray luminosity of Lx~1.5e44 erg/s and z~1.6, the cold Fe K at 6.4 keV is weak (EW~0.05keV), in agreement with the known trend. In contrast, high-ionization lines of Fe XXV and Fe XXVI are pronounced. These high-ionization Fe K lines appear to have a connection with high accretion rates. While no broad Fe emission is detected in the total spectrum, it might be present, albeit at low significance, when the X-ray luminosity is restricted to the range below 3e44 erg/s, or when an intermediate range of Eddington ratio around 0.1 is selected. In Type II AGN, both cold and high-ionzation lines become weak with increasing X-ray luminosity. However, strong high-ionization Fe K (EW~0.3 keV) is detected in the spectrum of objects at z>2, while no 6.4 keV line is found. It is then found that the primary source of the high-ionization Fe K emission is those objects detected with Spitzer-MIPS at 24 micron. Given their median redshift of z=2.5, their bolometric luminosity is likely to reach 10^13 Lsun and the MIPS-detected emission most likely originates from hot dust heated by embedded AGN, probably accreting at high Eddington ratio. These properties match those of rapidly growing black holes in ultra-luminous infrared galaxies at the interesting epoch (z=2-3) of galaxy formation.
  • The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2011 observing campaign was carried out over the course of 11 weeks in Spring 2011. Here we present the first results from this program, a measurement of the broad-line reverberation lag in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 50. Combining our data with supplemental observations obtained prior to the start of the main observing campaign, our dataset covers a total duration of 4.5 months. During this time, Mrk 50 was highly variable, exhibiting a maximum variability amplitude of a factor of 4 in the U-band continuum and a factor of 2 in the H-beta line. Using standard cross-correlation techniques, we find that H-beta and H-gamma lag the V-band continuum by tau_cen = 10.64(-0.93,+0.82) and 8.43(-1.28,+1.30) days, respectively, while the lag of He II 4686 is unresolved. The H-beta line exhibits a symmetric velocity-resolved reverberation signature with shorter lags in the high-velocity wings than in the line core, consistent with an origin in a broad-line region dominated by orbital motion rather than infall or outflow. Assuming a virial normalization factor of f=5.25, the virial estimate of the black hole mass is (3.2+-0.5)*10^7 solar masses. These observations demonstrate that Mrk 50 is among the most promising nearby active galaxies for detailed investigations of broad-line region structure and dynamics.
  • We identify an abundant population of extreme emission line galaxies (EELGs) at redshift z~1.7 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging from Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). 69 EELG candidates are selected by the large contribution of exceptionally bright emission lines to their near-infrared broad-band magnitudes. Supported by spectroscopic confirmation of strong [OIII] emission lines -- with rest-frame equivalent widths ~1000\AA -- in the four candidates that have HST/WFC3 grism observations, we conclude that these objects are galaxies with 10^8 Msol in stellar mass, undergoing an enormous starburst phase with M_*/(dM_*/dt) of only ~15 Myr. These bursts may cause outflows that are strong enough to produce cored dark matter profiles in low-mass galaxies. The individual star formation rates and the co-moving number density (3.7x10^-4 Mpc^-3) can produce in ~4 Gyr much of the stellar mass density that is presently contained in 10^8-10^9 Msol dwarf galaxies. Therefore, our observations provide a strong indication that many or even most of the stars in present-day dwarf galaxies formed in strong, short-lived bursts, mostly at z>1.
  • We present a study of the multi-wavelength properties, from the mid-infrared to the hard X-rays, of a sample of 255 spectroscopically identified X-ray selected Type-2 AGN from the XMM-COSMOS survey. Most of them are obscured the X-ray absorbing column density is determined by either X-ray spectral analyses (for the 45% of the sample), or from hardness ratios. Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) are computed for all sources in the sample. The average SEDs in the optical band is dominated by the host-galaxy light, especially at low X-ray luminosities and redshifts. There is also a trend between X-ray and mid-infrared luminosity: the AGN contribution in the infrared is higher at higher X-ray luminosities. We calculate bolometric luminosities, bolometric corrections, stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) for these sources using a multi-component modeling to properly disentangle the emission associated to stellar light from that due to black hole accretion. For 90% of the sample we also have the morphological classifications obtained with an upgraded version of the Zurich Estimator of Structural Types (ZEST+). We find that on average Type-2 AGN have lower bolometric corrections than Type-1 AGN. Moreover, we confirm that the morphologies of AGN host-galaxies indicate that there is a preference for these Type-2 AGN to be hosted in bulge-dominated galaxies with stellar masses greater than 10^10 solar masses.
  • We searched for quasars that are ~ 3 mag fainter than the SDSS quasars in the redshift range 3.7 < z < 4.7 in the COSMOS field to constrain the faint end of the quasar luminosity function. Using optical photometric data, we selected 31 quasar candidates with 22 < i' < 24 at z ~ 4. We obtained optical spectra for most of these candidates using FOCAS on the Subaru telescope, and identified 8 low-luminosity quasars at z ~ 4. In order to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) based on our spectroscopic follow-up campaign, we estimated the photometric completeness of our quasar survey through detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Our QLF at z ~ 4 has a much shallower faint-end slope beta = -1.67^{+0.11}_{-0.17} than that obtained by other recent surveys in the same redshift. Our result is consistent with the scenario of downsizing evolution of active galactic nuclei inferred by recent optical and X-ray quasar surveys at lower redshifts.
  • Based on the recent very deep near-infrared imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field with WFC3 on the Hubble Space Telescope, five groups published most probable samples of galaxies at z~8, selected by the so-called dropout method or photometric redshift; e.g., Y_105-dropouts (Y_105-J_125 > 0.8). These studies are highly useful for investigating both the early star formation history of galaxies and the sources of cosmic re-ionization. In order to better understand these issues, we carefully examine if there are low-$z$ interlopers in the samples of z~8 galaxy candidates. We focus on the strong emission-line galaxies at z~2 in this paper. Such galaxies may be selected as Y_105-dropouts since the [OIII] lambda 5007 emission line is redshifted into the J_125-band. We have found that the contamination from such low-$z$ interlopers is negligibly small. Therefore, all objects found by the five groups are free from this type of contamination. However, it remains difficult to extract real z~8 galaxies because all the sources are very faint and the different groups have found different candidates. With this in mind, we construct a robust sample of eight galaxies at z~8 from the objects found by the five groups: each of these eight objects has been selected by at least two groups. Using this sample, we discuss their UV continuum slope. We also discuss the escape fraction of ionizing photons adopting various metallicities. Our analysis suggests that massive stars forming in low-metallicity gas (Z~5 \times 10^-4 Z_sun) can be responsible for the completion of cosmic re-ionization if the escape fraction of ionizing continuum from galaxies is as large as 0.5, and this is consistent with the observed blue UV continua.
  • We present detailed morphological properties of Lyman alpha emitters (LAEs) at z~ 5.7 in the COSMOS field, based on {\it Hubble Space Telescope} Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) data. The ACS imaging in the F814W filter covered 85 LAEs of the 119 LAEs identified in the full two square degree field, and 47 LAEs of them are detected in the ACS images. Nearly half of them are spatially extended with a size larger than 0.15 arcsec (~0.88 kpc at z=5.7) up to 0.4 arcsec (~2.5 kpc at z=5.7). The others are nearly unresolved compact objects. Two LAEs show double-component structures, indicating interaction or merging of building components to form more massive galaxies. By stacking the ACS images of all the detected sources, we obtain a Sersic parameter of n~0.7 with a half-light radius of 0.13 arcsec (0.76 kpc), suggesting that the majority of ACS detected LAEs have not spheroidal-like but disk-like or irregular light profiles. Comparing ACS F814W magnitudes (I_814) with Subaru/Suprime-Cam magnitudes in the NB816, i', and z' bands, we find that the ACS imaging in the F814W band mainly probes UV continuum rather than Lyman alpha line emission. UV continuum sizes tend to be larger for LAEs with larger Ly\alpha emission regions as traced by the NB816 imaging. The non-detection of 38 LAEs in the ACS images is likely due to the fact that their surface brightness is even too low both in the UV continuum and Lyalpha emission. Estimating I_814 for the LAEs with ACS non-detection from the z' and NB816 magnitudes, we find that 16 of these are probably LAEs with a size larger than 0.15 arcsec in UV continuum. All these results suggest that our LAE sample contains systematically larger LAEs in UV continuum size than those previously studied at z~6.