• The weak transient detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) 0.4 s after GW150914 has generated much speculation regarding its possible association with the black-hole binary merger. Investigation of the GBM data by Connaughton et al. (2016) revealed a source location consistent with GW150914 and a spectrum consistent with a weak, short Gamma-Ray Burst. Greiner et al. (2016) present an alternative technique for fitting background-limited data in the low-count regime, and call into question the spectral analysis and the significance of the detection of GW150914-GBM presented in Connaughton et al. (2016). The spectral analysis of Connaughton et al. (2016) is not subject to the limitations of the low-count regime noted by Greiner et al. (2016). We find Greiner et al. (2016) used an inconsistent source position and did not follow the steps taken in Connaughton et al. (2016) to mitigate the statistical shortcomings of their software when analyzing this weak event. We use the approach of Greiner et al. (2016) to verify that our original spectral analysis is not biased. The detection significance of GW150914-GBM is established empirically, with a False Alarm Rate (FAR) of $\sim 10^{-4}$~Hz. A post-trials False Alarm Probability (FAP) of $2.2 \times 10^{-3}$ ($2.9 \sigma$) of this transient being associated with GW150914 is based on the proximity in time to the GW event of a transient with that FAR. The FAR and the FAP are unaffected by the spectral analysis that is the focus of Greiner et al. (2016).
  • On August 17, 2017 at 12:41:06 UTC the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detected and triggered on the short gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A. Approximately 1.7 s prior to this GRB, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) triggered on a binary compact merger candidate associated with the GRB. This is the first unambiguous coincident observation of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation from a single astrophysical source and marks the start of gravitational-wave multi-messenger astronomy. We report the GBM observations and analysis of this ordinary short GRB, which extraordinarily confirms that at least some short GRBs are produced by binary compact mergers.
  • With an instantaneous view of 70% of the sky, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an excellent partner in the search for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave (GW) events. GBM observations at the time of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) event GW150914 reveal the presence of a weak transient above 50 keV, 0.4~s after the GW event, with a false alarm probability of 0.0022 (2.9$\sigma$). This weak transient lasting 1 s was not detected by any other instrument and does not appear connected with other previously known astrophysical, solar, terrestrial, or magnetospheric activity. Its localization is ill-constrained but consistent with the direction of GW150914. The duration and spectrum of the transient event are consistent with a weak short Gamma-Ray Burst arriving at a large angle to the direction in which Fermi was pointing, where the GBM detector response is not optimal. If the GBM transient is associated with GW150914, this electromagnetic signal from a stellar mass black hole binary merger is unexpected. We calculate a luminosity in hard X-ray emission between 1~keV and 10~MeV of $1.8^{+1.5}_{-1.0} \times 10^{49}$~erg~s$^{-1}$. Future joint observations of GW events by LIGO/Virgo and Fermi GBM could reveal whether the weak transient reported here is a plausible counterpart to GW150914 or a chance coincidence, and will further probe the connection between compact binary mergers and short Gamma-Ray Bursts.
  • Evidence has been accumulated on the existence of a thermal-like component during the prompt phase of GRBs. This component, often associated with the GRB jet's photosphere, is usually subdominant compared to a much stronger non-thermal one. The prompt emission of Fermi GRB 131014A provides a unique opportunity to study this thermal-like component. Indeed, the thermal emission in GRB 131014A is much more intense than in other GRBs and a pure thermal episode is observed during the initial 0.16 s. The thermal-like component cools monotonically during the first second while the non-thermal emission kicks off. The intensity of the non-thermal component progressively increases until being energetically dominant at late time. This is a perfect scenario to disentangle the thermal component from the non-thermal one. A low-energy spectral index of +0.6 better fit the thermal component than the typical index value +1 corresponding to a pure Planck function. The non-thermal component is adequately fitted with a Band function whose low and high energy power law indices are ~-0.7 and <~-3, respectively; this is also statistically equivalent to a cutoff power law with a ~-0.7 index. This is in agreement with our previous results. Finally, a strong correlation is observed between the time-resolved luminosity of the non-thermal component, L$_i^{nTh}$, and its corresponding rest frame spectral peak energy, E$_{peak,i}^{rest,nTh}$, with a slope similar to the one reported in our previous articles. Assuming this relation to be universal for all GRBs we estimate a redshift of ~1.55 for GRB 131014A that is a typical value for long GRBs. These observational results are consistent with the models in which the non-thermal emission is produced well above the GRB jet photosphere but they may also be compatible with other scenarios (e.g., dissipative photosphere) that are not discussed in this article.
  • We reanalyze the prompt emission of two of the brightest Fermi GRBs (080916C and 090926A) with a new model composed of 3 components: (i) a thermal-like component--approximated with a black body (BB)--interpreted as the jet photosphere emission of a magnetized relativistic outflow, (ii) a non-thermal component--approximated with a Band function--interpreted as synchrotron radiation in an optically thin region above the photosphere either from internal shocks or magnetic field dissipation, and (iii) an extra power law (PL) extending from low to high energies likely of inverse Compton origin, even though it remains challenging. Through fine-time spectroscopy down to the 100 ms time scale, we follow the smooth evolution of the various components. From this analysis the Band function is globally the most intense component, although the additional PL can overpower the others in sharp time structures. The Band function and the BB component are the most intense at early times and globally fade across the burst duration. The additional PL is the most intense component at late time and may be correlated with the extended high-energy emission observed thousands of seconds after the burst with the Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT). Unexpectedly, this analysis also shows that the additional PL may be present from the very beginning of the burst. We investigate the effect of the three components on the new time-resolved luminosity-hardness relation in both the observer and rest frames and show that a strong correlation exists between the flux of the non-thermal component and its E$_{peak}$ only when the three components are fitted simultaneously to the data (i.e., F$_i^{NT}$-E$_{peak,i}^{NT}$ relation). In addition, this result points toward a universal relation between those two quantities for all GRBs when transposed to the central engine rest frame (i.e., L$_i^{NT}$-E$_{peak,i}^{rest,NT}$ relation).
  • We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of Swift X-ray light-curves of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) collecting data from more than 650 GRBs discovered by Swift and other facilities. The unprecedented sample size allows us to constrain the REST FRAME X-ray properties of GRBs from a statistical perspective, with particular reference to intrinsic time scales and the energetics of the different light-curve phases in a common rest-frame 0.3-30 keV energy band. Temporal variability episodes are also studied and their properties constrained. Two fundamental questions drive this effort: i) Does the X-ray emission retain any kind of "memory"of the prompt gamma-ray phase? ii) Where is the dividing line between long and short GRB X-ray properties? We show that short GRBs decay faster, are less luminous and less energetic than long GRBs in the X-rays, but are interestingly characterized by similar intrinsic absorption. We furthermore reveal the existence of a number of statistically significant relations that link the X-ray to prompt gamma-ray parameters in long GRBs; short GRBs are outliers of the majority of these 2-parameter relations. However and more importantly, we report on the existence of a universal 3-parameter scaling that links the X-ray and the gamma-ray energy to the prompt spectral peak energy of BOTH long and short GRBs: E_{X,iso}\propto E_{gamma,iso}^{1.00\pm 0.06}/E_{pk}^{0.60\pm 0.10}.
  • We present a homogeneous X-ray analysis of all 318 Gamma Ray Bursts detected by the X-ray Telescope on the Swift satellite up to 2008 July 23; this represents the largest sample of X-ray GRB data published to date. In Sections 2--3 we detail the methods which the Swift-XRT team has developed to produce the enhanced positions, light curves, hardness ratios and spectra presented in this paper. Software using these methods continues to create such products for all new GRBs observed by the Swift-XRT. We also detail web-based tools allowing users to create these products for any object observed by the XRT, not just GRBs. In Sections 4--6 we present the results of our analysis of GRBs, including probability distribution functions of the temporal and spectral properties of the sample. We demonstrate evidence for a consistent underlying behaviour which can produce a range of light curve morphologies, and attempt to interpret this behaviour in the framework of external forward shock emission. We find several difficulties, in particular that reconciliation of our data with the forward shock model requires energy injection to continue for days to weeks.
  • We propose a new method for the classification of optically dark gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), based on the X-ray and optical-to-X-ray spectral indices of GRB afterglows, and utilizing the spectral capabilities of Swift. This method depends less on model assumptions than previous methods, and can be used as a quick diagnostic tool to identify optically sub-luminous bursts. With this method we can also find GRBs that are extremely bright at optical wavelengths. We show that the previously suggested correlation between the optical darkness and the X-ray/gamma-ray brightness is merely an observational selection effect.
  • Correlation studies of prompt and afterglow emissions from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) between different spectral bands has been difficult to do in the past because few bursts had comprehensive and intercomparable afterglow measurements. In this paper we present a large and uniform data set for correlation analysis based on bursts detected by the Swift mission. For the first time, short and long bursts can be analyzed and compared. It is found for both classes that the optical, X-ray and gamma-ray emissions are linearly correlated, but with a large spread about the correlation line; stronger bursts tend to have brighter afterglows, and bursts with brighter X-ray afterglow tend to have brighter optical afterglow. Short bursts are, on average, weaker in both prompt and afterglow emissions. No short bursts are seen with extremely low optical to X-ray ratio as occurs for "dark" long bursts. Although statistics are still poor for short bursts, there is no evidence yet for a subgroup of short bursts with high extinction as there is for long bursts. Long bursts are detected in the dark category at the same fraction as for pre-Swift bursts. Interesting cases are discovered of long bursts that are detected in the optical, and yet have low enough optical to X-ray ratio to be classified as dark. For the prompt emission, short and long bursts have different average tracks on flux vs fluence plots. In Swift, GRB detections tend to be fluence limited for short bursts and flux limited for long events.
  • Massive stars end their short lives in spectacular explosions, supernovae, that synthesize new elements and drive galaxy evolution. Throughout history supernovae were discovered chiefly through their delayed optical light, preventing observations in the first moments (hours to days) following the explosion. As a result, the progenitors of some supernovae and the events leading up to their violent demise remain intensely debated. Here we report the serendipitous discovery of a supernova at the time of explosion, marked by an extremely luminous X-ray outburst. We attribute the outburst to the break-out of the supernova shock-wave from the progenitor, and show that the inferred rate of such events agrees with that of all core-collapse supernovae. We forecast that future wide-field X-ray surveys will catch hundreds of supernovae each year in the act of explosion, and thereby enable crucial neutrino and gravitational wave detections that may ultimately unravel the explosion mechanism.
  • Swift-XRT observations of the X-ray emission from gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and during the GRB afterglow have led to many new results during the past two years. One of these exciting results is that approximately 1/3-1/2 of GRBs contain detectable X-ray flares. The mean fluence of the X-ray flares is ~10 times less than that of the initial prompt emission, but in some cases the flare is as energetic as the prompt emission itself. The flares display fast rises and decays, and they sometimes occur at very late times relative to the prompt emission (sometimes as late as 10^5 s after T_0) with very high peak fluxes relative to the underlying afterglow decay that has clearly begun prior to some flares. The temporal and spectral properties of the flares are found to favor models in which flares arise due to the same GRB internal engine processes that spawned the prompt GRB emission. Therefore, both long and short GRB internal engine models must be capable of producing high fluences in the X-ray band at very late times.
  • We present science highlights and performance from the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT), which was launched on November 20, 2004. The XRT covers the 0.2-10 keV band, and spends most of its time observing gamma-ray burst (GRB)afterglows, though it has also performed observations of many other objects. By mid-August 2007, the XRT had observed over 220 GRB afterglows, detecting about 96% of them. The XRT positions enable followup ground-based optical observations, with roughly 60% of the afterglows detected at optical or near IR wavelengths. Redshifts are measured for 33% of X-ray afterglows. Science highlights include the discovery of flaring behavior at quite late times, with implications for GRB central engines; localization of short GRBs, leading to observational support for compact merger progenitors for this class of bursts; a mysterious plateau phase to GRB afterglows; as well as many other interesting observations such as X-ray emission from comets, novae, galactic transients, and other objects.
  • We report on the temporal and spectral characteristics of the early X-ray emission from the GRB 050822 as observed by Swift. This burst is likely to be an XRF showing major X-ray flares in its XRT light-curve. The quality of the data allows a detailed spectral analysis of the early afterglow in the X-ray band. During the X-ray flares, a positive correlation between the count rate and the spectral hardness (i.e. the higher the count rate, the harder the spectrum) is clearly seen for the X-ray flares. This behaviour, similar to that seen for Gamma-ray pulses, indicates that the energy peak of the spectrum is in the XRT energy band and it moves towards lower energies with time. We show evidence for the possible detection of the emergence of the forward-shock emission, produced at a radius larger than 4x10^16 cm in the case of a CBM afterglow model (a formation region clearly different from that producing the prompt emission). Finally, we show that the null detection of a jet break up to T_0 + 4x10^6 s in the X-ray light curve of this XRF can be understood: i) if the jet seen on-axis is uniform with a large opening angle theta > 20 degrees); or ii) if the jet is a structured Gaussian-like jet with the line-of-sight outside the bright Gaussian core.
  • Context. Swift data are revolutionising our understanding of Gamma Ray Bursts. Since bursts fade rapidly, it is desirable to create and disseminate accurate light curves rapidly. Aims. To provide the community with an online repository of X-ray light curves obtained with Swift. The light curves should be of the quality expected of published data, but automatically created and updated so as to be self-consistent and rapidly available. Methods. We have produced a suite of programs which automatically generates Swift/XRT light curves of GRBs. Effects of the damage to the CCD, automatic readout-mode switching and pile-up are appropriately handled, and the data are binned with variable bin durations, as necessary for a fading source. Results. The light curve repository website (http://www.swift.ac.uk/xrt_curves) contains light curves, hardness ratios and deep images for every GRB which Swift's XRT has observed. When new GRBs are detected, light curves are created and updated within minutes of the data arriving at the UK Swift Science Data Centre.
  • We present the first systematic investigation of the morphological and timing properties of flares in GRBs observed by Swift/XRT. We consider a large sample drawn from all GRBs detected by Swift, INTEGRAL and HETE-2 prior to 2006 Jan 31, which had an XRT follow-up and which showed significant flaring. Our sample of 33 GRBs includes long and short, at low and high redshift, and a total of 69 flares. The strongest flares occur in the early phases, with a clear anti-correlation between the flare peak intensity and the flare time of occurrence. Fitting each X-ray flare with a Gaussian model, we find that the mean ratio of the width and peak time is <Delta t / t > = 0.13+/-0.10, albeit with a large scatter. Late flares at times > 2000 seconds have long durations, Delta t>300 s, and can be very energetic compared to the underlying continuum. We further investigated if there is a clear link between the number of pulses detected in the prompt phase by BAT and the number of X-ray flares detected by XRT, finding no correlation. However, we find that the distribution of intensity ratios between successive BAT prompt pulses and that between successive XRT flares is the same, an indication of a common origin for gamma-ray pulses and X-ray flares. All evidence indicates that flares are indeed related to the workings of the central engine and, within the standard fireball scenario, originate from internal shocks rather than external shocks. While all flares can be explained by long-lasting engine activity, 29/69 flares may also be explained by refreshed shocks. However, 10 can only be explained by prolonged activity of the central engine.
  • The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) has discovered that flares are quite common in early X-ray afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), being observed in roughly 50% of afterglows with prompt followup observations. The flares range in fluence from a few percent to ~ 100% of the fluence of the prompt emission (the GRB). Repetitive flares are seen, with more than 4 successive flares detected by the XRT in some afterglows. The rise and fall times of the flares are typically considerably smaller than the time since the burst. These characteristics suggest that the flares are related to the prompt emission mechanism, but at lower photon energies. We conclude that the most likely cause of these flares is late-time activity of the GRB central engine.
  • We present a catalogue of refined positions of 68 gamma ray burst (GRB) afterglows observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) from the launch up to 2005 Oct 16. This is a result of the refinement of the XRT boresight calibration. We tested this correction by means of a systematic study of a large sample of X-ray sources observed by XRT with well established optical counterparts. We found that we can reduce the systematic error radius of the measurements by a factor of two, from 6.5" to 3.2" (90% of confidence). We corrected all the positions of the afterglows observed by XRT in the first 11 months of the Swift mission. This is particularly important for the 37 X-ray afterglows without optical counterpart. Optical follow-up of dark GRBs, in fact, will be more efficient with the use of the more accurate XRT positions.