• We present the results of a {\it Hubble Space Telescope} ACS/HRC FUV, ACS/WFC optical study into the cluster populations of a sample of 22 Luminous Infrared Galaxies in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey. Through integrated broadband photometry we have derived ages and masses for a total of 484 star clusters contained within these systems. This allows us to examine the properties of star clusters found in the extreme environments of LIRGs relative to lower luminosity star-forming galaxies in the local Universe. We find that by adopting a Bruzual \& Charlot simple stellar population (SSP) model and Salpeter initial mass function, the age distribution of clusters declines as $dN/d\tau = \tau^{-0.9 +/- 0.3}$, consistent with the age distribution derived for the Antennae Galaxies, and interpreted as evidence for rapid cluster disruption occuring in the strong tidal fields of merging galaxies. The large number of $10^{6} M_{\odot}$ young clusters identified in the sample also suggests that LIRGs are capable of producing more high-mass clusters than what is observed to date in any lower luminosity star-forming galaxy in the local Universe. The observed cluster mass distribution of $dN/dM = M^{-1.95 +/- 0.11}$ is consistent with the canonical -2 power law used to describe the underlying initial cluster mass function (ICMF) for a wide range of galactic environments. We interpret this as evidence against mass-dependent cluster disruption, which would flatten the observed CMF relative to the underlying ICMF distribution.
  • In the era of large astronomical surveys, photometric classification of supernovae (SNe) has become an important research field due to limited spectroscopic resources for candidate follow-up and classification. In this work, we present a method to photometrically classify type Ia supernovae based on machine learning with redshifts that are derived from the SN light-curves. This method is implemented on real data from the SNLS deferred pipeline, a purely photometric pipeline that identifies SNe Ia at high-redshifts ($0.2<z<1.1$). Our method consists of two stages: feature extraction (obtaining the SN redshift from photometry and estimating light-curve shape parameters) and machine learning classification. We study the performance of different algorithms such as Random Forest and Boosted Decision Trees. We evaluate the performance using SN simulations and real data from the first 3 years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), which contains large spectroscopically and photometrically classified type Ia samples. Using the Area Under the Curve (AUC) metric, where perfect classification is given by 1, we find that our best-performing classifier (Extreme Gradient Boosting Decision Tree) has an AUC of $0.98$. We show that it is possible to obtain a large photometrically selected type Ia SN sample with an estimated contamination of less than $5\%$. When applied to data from the first three years of SNLS, we obtain 529 events. We investigate the differences between classifying simulated SNe, and real SN survey data. In particular, we find that applying a thorough set of selection cuts to the SN sample is essential for good classification. This work demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of machine learning classification in a high-$z$ SN survey with application to real SN data.
  • We present a suite of cosmological N-body simulations with cold dark matter and baryons aiming at modeling the low-density regions of the IGM as probed by the Lyman-$\alpha$ forests at high redshift. The simulations are designed to match the requirements imposed by the quality of BOSS and eBOSS data. They are made using either 2x768$^3$ or 2x192$^3$ particles, spanning volumes ranging from (25 Mpc.h$^{-1})^3$ for high-resolution simulations to (100 Mpc.h$^{-1})^3$ for large-volume ones. Using a splicing technique, the resolution is further enhanced to reach the equivalent of simulations with 2x3072$^3$= 58 billion particles in a (100 Mpc.h$^{-1}$)^3 box size, i.e. a mean mass per gas particle of 1.2x10$^5$M_sun.h$^{-1}$. We show that the resulting power spectrum is accurate at the 2% level over the full range from a few Mpc to several tens of Mpc. We explore the effect on the one-dimensional transmitted-flux power spectrum of 4 cosmological parameters ($n_s, \sigma_8, \Omega_m, H_0$) and 2 astrophysical parameters ($T_0, \gamma$) related to the heating rate of the IGM. By varying the input parameters around a central model chosen to be in agreement with the latest Planck results, we built a grid of simulations that allows the study of the impact on the flux power spectrum of these six relevant parameters. We improve upon previous studies by not only measuring the effect of each parameter individually, but also probing the impact of the simultaneous variation of each pair of parameters. We thus provide a full second-order expansion, including cross-terms, around our central model. We check the validity of the second-order expansion with independent simulations obtained either with different cosmological parameters or different seeds. Finally, a comparison to the one-dimensional Ly-$\alpha$ forest power spectrum obtained with BOSS shows an excellent agreement.
  • We present spectra and lightcurves of SNLS 06D4eu and SNLS 07D2bv, two hydrogen-free superluminous supernovae discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey. At z = 1.588, SNLS 06D4eu is the highest redshift superluminous SN with a spectrum, at M_U = -22.7 is one of the most luminous SNe ever observed, and gives a rare glimpse into the restframe ultraviolet where these supernovae put out their peak energy. SNLS 07D2bv does not have a host galaxy redshift, but based on the supernova spectrum, we estimate it to be at z ~ 1.5. Both supernovae have similar observer-frame griz lightcurves, which map to restframe lightcurves in the U-band and UV, rising in ~ 20 restframe days or longer, and declining over a similar timescale. The lightcurves peak in the shortest wavelengths first, consistent with an expanding blackbody starting near 15,000 K and steadily declining in temperature. We compare the spectra to theoretical models, and identify lines of C II, C III, Fe III, and Mg II in the spectrum of SNLS 06D4eu and SCP 06F6, and find that they are consistent with an expanding explosion of only a few solar masses of carbon, oxygen, and other trace metals. Thus the progenitors appear to be related to those suspected for SNe Ic. A high kinetic energy, 10^52 ergs, is also favored. Normal mechanisms of powering core- collapse or thermonuclear supernovae do not seem to work for these supernovae. We consider models powered by 56Ni decay and interaction with circumstellar material, but find that the creation and spin-down of a magnetar with a period of 2ms, magnetic field of 2 x 10^14 Gauss, and a 3 solar mass progenitor provides the best fit to the data.
  • We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate (SNR_Ia) as a function of redshift for the first four years of data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). This analysis includes 286 spectroscopically confirmed and more than 400 additional photometrically identified SNe Ia within the redshift range 0.1<z<1.1. The volumetric SNR_Ia evolution is consistent with a rise to z~1.0 that follows a power-law of the form (1+z)^alpha, with alpha=2.11+/-0.28. This evolutionary trend in the SNLS rates is slightly shallower than that of the cosmic star-formation history over the same redshift range. We combine the SNLS rate measurements with those from other surveys that complement the SNLS redshift range, and fit various simple SN Ia delay-time distribution (DTD) models to the combined data. A simple power-law model for the DTD (i.e., proportional to t^-beta) yields values from beta=0.98+/-0.05 to beta=1.15+/-0.08 depending on the parameterization of the cosmic star formation history. A two-component model, where SNR_Ia is dependent on stellar mass (Mstellar) and star formation rate (SFR) as SNR_Ia(z)=AxMstellar(z) + BxSFR(z), yields the coefficients A=1.9+/-0.1 SNe/yr/M_solar and B=3.3+/-0.2 SNe/yr/(M_solar/yr). More general two-component models also fit the data well, but single Gaussian or exponential DTDs provide significantly poorer matches. Finally, we split the SNLS sample into two populations by the light curve width (stretch), and show that the general behavior in the rates of faster-declining SNe Ia (0.8<s<1.0) is similar, within our measurement errors, to that of the slower objects (1.0<s<1.3) out to z~0.8.
  • We use the wide-field capabilities of the 2dF fibre positioner and the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) to obtain redshifts of galaxies that hosted supernovae during the first three years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). With exposure times ranging from 10 to 60 ksec per galaxy, we were able to obtain redshifts for 400 host galaxies in two SNLS fields, thereby substantially increasing the total number of SNLS supernovae with host galaxy redshifts. The median redshift of the galaxies in our sample that hosted photometrically classified Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is 0.77, which is 25% higher than the median redshift of spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia in the three-year sample of the SNLS. Our results demonstrate that one can use wide-field fibre-fed multi-object spectrographs on 4m telescopes to efficiently obtain redshifts for large numbers of supernova host galaxies over the large areas of sky that will be covered by future high-redshift supernova surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey.
  • We calculate the average stretch-corrected rise-time of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Supernova Legacy Survey. We use the aggregate lightcurves of spectroscopic and photometrically identified SNe Ia to fit the rising part of the lightcurve with a simple quadratic model. We obtain a lightcurve shape corrected, i .e. stretch-corrected, fiducial rise-time of 17.02^{+0.18}_{-0.28} (stat) days. The measured rise-time differs from an earlier finding by the SNLS (Conley et al. 2006) due to the use of different SN Ia templates. We compare it to nearby samples using the same methods and find no evolution in the early part of the lightcurve of SNe Ia up to z=1. We search for variations among different populations, particularly subluminous objects, by dividing the sample in stretch. Bright and slow decliners (s>1.0) have consistent stretch-corrected rise-times compared to fainter and faster decliners (0.8<s<1.0); they are shorter by 0.57^{+0.47}_{-0.50} (stat) days. Subluminous SNe Ia (here defined as objects with s<0.8), although less constrained, are also consistent, with a rise-time of 18.03^{+0.81}_{-1.37} (stat) days. We study several systematic biases and find that the use of different fiducial templates may affect the average rise-time but not the intrinsic differences between populations. Based on our results, we estimate that subluminous SNe Ia are powered by 0.05-0.35 solar masses of radioactive nickel synthesized in the explosion. Our conclusions are the same for the single-stretch and two-stretch parameterizations of the lightcurve.
  • We present a sample of 485 photometrically identified Type Ia supernova candidates mined from the first three years of data of the CFHT SuperNova Legacy Survey (SNLS). The images were submitted to a deferred processing independent of the SNLS real-time detection pipeline. Light curves of all transient events were reconstructed in the g_M, r_M, i_M and z_M filters and submitted to automated sequential cuts in order to identify possible supernovae. Pure noise and long-term variable events were rejected by light curve shape criteria. Type Ia supernova identification relied on event characteristics fitted to their light curves assuming the events to be normal SNe Ia. The light curve fitter SALT2 was used for this purpose, assigning host galaxy photometric redshifts to the tested events. The selected sample of 485 candidates is one magnitude deeper than that allowed by the SNLS spectroscopic identification. The contamination by supernovae of other types is estimated to be 4%. Testing Hubble diagram residuals with this enlarged sample allows us to measure the Malmquist bias due to spectroscopic selections directly. The result is fully consistent with the precise Monte Carlo based estimate used to correct SN Ia distance moduli in the SNLS 3-year cosmological analyses. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of a photometric selection of high redshift supernovae with known host galaxy redshifts, opening interesting prospects for cosmological analyses from future large photometric SN Ia surveys.
  • The imprint of Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) on the matter power spectrum can be constrained using the neutral hydrogen density in the intergalactic medium as a tracer of the matter density. One of the goals of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) is to derive the Hubble expansion rate and the angular scale from the BAO signal in the IGM. To this aim, the Lyman-alpha forest of 10^5 quasars will be observed in the redshift range 2.2<z<3.5 and over 10,000 deg^2. We simulated the BOSS QSO survey to estimate the statistical accuracy on the BAO scale determination provided by such a large scale survey. In particular, we discuss the effect of the poorly constrained estimate of the unabsorbed intrinsic quasar spectrum. The volume of current N-body simulations being too small for such studies, we resorted to Gaussian random field (GRF) simulations. We validated the use of GRFs by comparing the output of GRF simulations with that of the Horizon N-body simulation with the same initial conditions. Realistic mock samples of QSO Lyman-\alpha forest were generated; their power spectrum was computed and fitted to obtain the BAO scale. The rms of the results for 100 different simulations provides an estimate of the statistical error expected from the BOSS survey. We confirm the results from Fisher matrix estimate. In the absence of error on the unabsorbed quasar spectrum, the BOSS quasar survey should measure the BAO scale with an error of the order of 2.3%, or the transverse and radial BAO scales separately with errors of the order of 6.8% and 3.9%, respectively. The significance of the BAO detection is assessed by an average \Delta\chi^2=17 but for individual realizations \Delta\chi^2 ranges from 2 t o 35. The error on the unabsorbed quasar spectrum increases the error on the BAO scale by 10 to 20% and results in a sub percent bias.
  • While it is generally accepted that Type Ia supernovae are the result of the explosion of a carbon-oxygen White Dwarf accreting mass in a binary system, the details of their genesis still elude us, and the nature of the binary companion is uncertain. Kasen (2010) points out that the presence of a non-degenerate companion in the progenitor system could leave an observable trace: a flux excess in the early rise portion of the lightcurve caused by the ejecta impact with the companion itself. This excess would be observable only under favorable viewing angles, and its intensity depends on the nature of the companion. We searched for the signature of a non-degenerate companion in three years of Supernova Legacy Survey data by generating synthetic lightcurves accounting for the effects of shocking and comparing true and synthetic time series with Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. Our most constraining result comes from noting that the shocking effect is more prominent in rest-frame B than V band: we rule out a contribution from white dwarf-red giant binary systems to Type Ia supernova explosions greater than 10% at 2 sigma, and than 20% at 3 sigma level.
  • 3D mapping of matter distribution in the universe through the 21 cm radio emission of atomic hydrogen is a complementary approach to optical surveys for the study of the Large Scale Structures, in particular for measuring the BAO (Baryon Acoustic Oscillation) scale up to redshifts z <~ 3 and constrain dark energy. We propose to carry such a survey through a novel method, called intensity mapping, without detecting individual galaxies radio emission. This method requires a wide band instrument, 100 MHz or larger, and multiple beams, while a rather modest angular resolution of 10 arcmin would be sufficient. The instrument would have a few thousand square meters of collecting area and few hundreds of simultaneous beams. These constraints could be fulfilled with a dense array of receivers in interferometric mode, or a phased array at the focal plane of a large antenna.
  • We present observational constraints on the nature of dark energy using the Supernova Legacy Survey three year sample (SNLS3) of Guy et al. (2010) and Conley et al. (2011). We use the 472 SNe Ia in this sample, accounting for recently discovered correlations between SN Ia luminosity and host galaxy properties, and include the effects of all identified systematic uncertainties directly in the cosmological fits. Combining the SNLS3 data with the full WMAP7 power spectrum, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxy power spectrum, and a prior on the Hubble constant H0 from SHOES, in a flat universe we find omega_m=0.269+/-0.015 and w=-1.061+0.069-0.068 -- a 6.5% measure of the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w. The statistical and systematic uncertainties are approximately equal, with the systematic uncertainties dominated by the photometric calibration of the SN Ia fluxes -- without these calibration effects, systematics contribute only a ~2% error in w. When relaxing the assumption of flatness, we find omega_m=0.271+/-0.015, omega_k=-0.002+/-0.006, and w=-1.069+0.091-0.092. Parameterizing the time evolution of w as w(a)=w_0+w_a(1-a), gives w_0=-0.905+/-0.196, w_a=-0.984+1.094-1.097 in a flat universe. All of our results are consistent with a flat, w=-1 universe. The size of the SNLS3 sample allows various tests to be performed with the SNe segregated according to their light curve and host galaxy properties. We find that the cosmological constraints derived from these different sub-samples are consistent. There is evidence that the coefficient, beta, relating SN Ia luminosity and color, varies with host parameters at >4sigma significance (in addition to the known SN luminosity--host relation); however this has only a small effect on the cosmological results and is currently a sub-dominant systematic.
  • The SDSS-III BOSS Quasar survey will attempt to observe z>2.15 quasars at a density of at least 15 per square degree to yield the first measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Ly-alpha forest. To help reaching this goal, we have developed a method to identify quasars based on their variability in the u g r i z optical bands. The method has been applied to the selection of quasar targets in the SDSS region known as Stripe 82 (the Southern equatorial stripe), where numerous photometric observations are available over a 10-year baseline. This area was observed by BOSS during September and October 2010. Only 8% of the objects selected via variability are not quasars, while 90% of the previously identified high-redshift quasar population is recovered. The method allows for a significant increase in the z>2.15 quasar density over previous strategies based on optical (ugriz) colors, achieving a density of 24.0 deg^{-2} on average down to g~22 over the 220 deg^2 area of Stripe 82. We applied this method to simulated data from the Palomar Transient Factory and from Pan-STARRS, and showed that even with data that have sparser time sampling than what is available in Stripe 82, including variability in future quasar selection strategies would lead to increased target selection efficiency in the z>2.15 redshift range. We also found that Broad Absorption Line quasars are preferentially present in a variability than in a color selection.
  • From a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of 78 z~3 high quality quasar spectra in the SDSS-DR7, we derive the principal components characterizing the QSO continuum over the full wavelength range available. The shape of the mean continuum, is similar to that measured at low-z (z~1), but the equivalent width of the emission lines are larger at low redshift. We calculate the correlation between fluxes at different wavelengths and find that the emission line fluxes in the red part of the spectrum are correlated with that in the blue part. We construct a projection matrix to predict the continuum in the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest from the red part of the spectrum. We apply this matrix to quasars in the SDSS-DR7 to derive the evolution with redshift of the mean flux in the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest due to the absorption by the intergalactic neutral hydrogen. A change in the evolution of the mean flux is apparent around z~3 in the sense of a steeper decrease of the mean flux at higher redshifts. The same evolution is found when the continuum is estimated from the extrapolation of a power-law continuum fitted in the red part of the quasar spectrum if a correction, derived from simple simulations, is applied. Our findings are consistent with previous determinations using high spectral resolution data. We provide the PCA eigenvectors over the wavelength range 1020-2000 \AA\ and the distribution of their weights that can be used to simulate QSO mock spectra.
  • We combine high redshift Type Ia supernovae from the first 3 years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) with other supernova (SN) samples, primarily at lower redshifts, to form a high-quality joint sample of 472 SNe (123 low-$z$, 93 SDSS, 242 SNLS, and 14 {\it Hubble Space Telescope}). SN data alone require cosmic acceleration at >99.9% confidence, including systematic effects. For the dark energy equation of state parameter (assumed constant out to at least $z=1.4$) in a flat universe, we find $w = -0.91^{+0.16}_{-0.20}(\mathrm{stat}) ^{+0.07}_{-0.14} (\mathrm{sys})$ from SNe only, consistent with a cosmological constant. Our fits include a correction for the recently discovered relationship between host-galaxy mass and SN absolute brightness. We pay particular attention to systematic uncertainties, characterizing them using a systematics covariance matrix that incorporates the redshift dependence of these effects, as well as the shape-luminosity and color-luminosity relationships. Unlike previous work, we include the effects of systematic terms on the empirical light-curve models. The total systematic uncertainty is dominated by calibration terms. We describe how the systematic uncertainties can be reduced with soon to be available improved nearby and intermediate-redshift samples, particularly those calibrated onto USNO/SDSS-like systems.
  • The rate evolution of subluminous Type Ia Supernovae is presented using data from the Supernova Legacy Survey. This sub-sample represents the faint and rapidly-declining light-curves of the observed supernova Ia (SN Ia) population here defined by low stretch values (s<0.8). Up to redshift z=0.6, we find 18 photometrically-identified subluminous SNe Ia, of which six have spectroscopic redshift (and three are spectroscopically-confirmed SNe Ia). The evolution of the subluminous volumetric rate is constant or slightly decreasing with redshift, in contrast to the increasing SN Ia rate found for the normal stretch population, although a rising behaviour is not conclusively ruled out. The subluminous sample is mainly found in early-type galaxies with little or no star formation, so that the rate evolution is consistent with a galactic mass dependent behavior: $r(z)=A\times M_g$, with $A=(1.1\pm0.3)\times10^{-14}$ SNe per year and solar mass.
  • We present photometric properties and distance measurements of 252 high redshift Type Ia supernovae (0.15 < z < 1.1) discovered during the first three years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). These events were detected and their multi-colour light curves measured using the MegaPrime/MegaCam instrument at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), by repeatedly imaging four one-square degree fields in four bands. Follow-up spectroscopy was performed at the VLT, Gemini and Keck telescopes to confirm the nature of the supernovae and to measure their redshifts. Systematic uncertainties arising from light curve modeling are studied, making use of two techniques to derive the peak magnitude, shape and colour of the supernovae, and taking advantage of a precise calibration of the SNLS fields. A flat LambdaCDM cosmological fit to 231 SNLS high redshift Type Ia supernovae alone gives Omega_M = 0.211 +/- 0.034(stat) +/- 0.069(sys). The dominant systematic uncertainty comes from uncertainties in the photometric calibration. Systematic uncertainties from light curve fitters come next with a total contribution of +/- 0.026 on Omega_M. No clear evidence is found for a possible evolution of the slope (beta) of the colour-luminosity relation with redshift.
  • GMOS optical long-slit spectroscopy at the Gemini-North telescope was used to classify targets from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) from July 2005 and May 2006 - May 2008. During this time, 95 objects were observed. Where possible the objects' redshifts (z) were measured from narrow emission or absorption features in the host galaxy spectrum, otherwise they were measured from the broader supernova features. We present spectra of 68 confirmed or probable SNe Ia from SNLS with redshifts in the range 0.17 \leq z \leq 1.02. In combination with earlier SNLS Gemini and VLT spectra, we used these new observations to measure pseudo-equivalent widths (EWs) of three spectral features - CaII H&K, SiII and MgII - in 144 objects and compared them to the EWs of low-redshift SNe Ia from a sample drawn from the literature. No signs of changes with z are seen for the CaII H&K and MgII features. Systematically lower EW SiII is seen at high redshift, but this can be explained by a change in demographics of the SNe Ia population within a two-component model combined with an observed correlation between EW SiII and photometric lightcurve stretch.
  • We present a method using the SALT2 light curve fitter to determine the redshift of Type Ia supernovae in the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) based on their photometry in g', r', i' and z'. On 289 supernovae of the first three years of SNLS data, we obtain a precision $\sigma_{\Delta z/(1+z)} = 0.022$ on average up to a redshift of 1.0, with a higher precision of 0.016 for z<0.45 and a lower one of 0.025 for z>0.45. The rate of events with $|\Delta z|/(1+z)>0.15$ (catastrophic errors) is 1.4%. Both the precision and the rate of catastrophic errors are better than what can be currently obtained using host galaxy photometric redshifts. Photometric redshifts of this precision may be useful for future experiments which aim to discover up to millions of supernovae Ia but without spectroscopy for most of them.
  • An analysis of data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite is presented for the z=0.036 merging galaxy system II Zw 096 (CGCG 448-020). Because II Zw 096 has an infrared luminosity of log(L_IR/L_sun) = 11.94, it is classified as a Luminous Infrared Galaxy (LIRG), and was observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The Spitzer data suggest that 80% of the total infrared luminosity comes from an extremely compact, red source not associated with the nuclei of the merging galaxies. The Spitzer mid-infrared spectra indicate no high-ionization lines from a buried active galactic nucleus in this source. The strong detection of the 3.3 micron and 6.2 micron PAH emission features in the AKARI and Spitzer spectra also implies that the energy source of II Zw 096 is a starburst. Based on Spitzer infrared imaging and AKARI near-infrared spectroscopy, the star formation rate is estimated to be 120 M_sun/yr and > 45 M_sun/yr, respectively. Finally, the high-resolution B, I, and H-band images show many star clusters in the interacting system. The colors of these clusters suggest at least two populations - one with an age of 1-5 Myr and one with an age of 20-500 Myr, reddened by 0-2 magnitudes of visual extinction. The masses of these clusters span a range between 10^6-10^8 M_sun. This starburst source is reminiscent of the extra-nuclear starburst seen in NGC 4038/9 (the Antennae Galaxies) and Arp 299 but approximately an order of magnitude more luminous than the Antennae. The source is remarkable in that the off-nuclear infrared luminosity dominates the enitre system.
  • (Abridged) Precision cosmology with Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) makes use of the fact that SN Ia luminosities depend on their light-curve shapes and colours. Using Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) and other data, we show that there is an additional dependence on the global characteristics of their host galaxies: events of the same light-curve shape and colour are, on average, 0.08mag (~4.0sigma) brighter in massive host galaxies (presumably metal-rich) and galaxies with low specific star-formation rates (sSFR). SNe Ia in galaxies with a low sSFR also have a smaller slope ("beta") between their luminosities and colours with ~2.7sigma significance, and a smaller scatter on SN Ia Hubble diagrams (at 95% confidence), though the significance of these effects is dependent on the reddest SNe. SN Ia colours are similar between low-mass and high-mass hosts, leading us to interpret their luminosity differences as an intrinsic property of the SNe and not of some external factor such as dust. If the host stellar mass is interpreted as a metallicity indicator, the luminosity trends are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. We show that the average stellar mass, and therefore the average metallicity, of our SN Ia host galaxies decreases with redshift. The SN Ia luminosity differences consequently introduce a systematic error in cosmological analyses, comparable to the current statistical uncertainties on parameters such as w. We show that the use of two SN Ia absolute magnitudes, one for events in high-mass (metal-rich) galaxies, and one for events in low-mass (metal-poor) galaxies, adequately corrects for the differences. Cosmological fits incorporating these terms give a significant reduction in chi^2 (3.8-4.5sigma). We conclude that future SN Ia cosmological analyses should use a correction of this (or similar) form to control demographic shifts in the galaxy population.
  • The observed brightness of Type Ia supernovae is affected by gravitational lensing caused by the mass distribution along the line of sight, which introduces an additional dispersion into the Hubble diagram. We look for evidence of lensing in the SuperNova Legacy Survey 3-year data set. We investigate the correlation between the residuals from the Hubble diagram and the gravitational magnification based on a modeling of the mass distribution of foreground galaxies. A deep photometric catalog, photometric redshifts, and well established mass luminosity relations are used. We find evidence of a lensing signal with a 2.3 sigma significance. The current result is limited by the number of SNe, their redshift distribution, and the other sources of scatter in the Hubble diagram. Separating the galaxy population into a red and a blue sample has a positive impact on the significance of the signal detection. On the other hand, increasing the depth of the galaxy catalog, the precision of photometric redshifts or reducing the scatter in the mass luminosity relations have little effect. We show that for the full SuperNova Legacy Survey sample (~400 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia SNe and ~200 photometrically identified Type Ia SNe), there is an 80% probability of detecting the lensing signal with a 3 sigma significance.
  • We have combined the large SN Ia database of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey and catalogs of galaxies with photometric redshifts, VLA 1.4 GHz radio sources, and Spitzer infrared sources. We present eight SNe Ia in early-type host galaxies which have counterparts in the radio and infrared source catalogs. We find the SN Ia rate in subsets of radio and infrared early-type galaxies is ~1-5 times the rate in all early-type galaxies, and that any enhancement is always <~ 2 sigma. Rates in these subsets are consistent with predictions of the two component "A+B" SN Ia rate model. Since infrared properties of radio SN Ia hosts indicate dust obscured star formation, we incorporate infrared star formation rates into the "A+B" model. We also show the properties of SNe Ia in radio and infrared galaxies suggest the hosts contain dust and support a continuum of delay time distributions for SNe Ia, although other delay time distributions cannot be ruled out based on our data.
  • Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and their effects on the matter power spectrum can be studied by using the Lyman-alpha absorption signature of the matter density field along quasar (QSO) lines of sight. A measurement sufficiently accurate to provide useful cosmological constraints requires the observation of ~100000 quasars in the redshift range 2.2<z<3.5 over ~8000 deg2. Such a survey is planned by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) project of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III).In practice, one needs a stellar rejection of more than two orders of magnitude with a selection efficiency for quasars better than 50% up to magnitudes as large as g ~ 22. To obtain an appropriate target list and estimate quasar redshifts, we have developed an Artificial Neural Networks (NN) with a multilayer perceptron architecture. The input variables are photometric measurements, i.e. the object magnitudes and their errors in the five bands (ugriz) of the SDSS photometry. For target selection, we achieve a non-quasar point-like object rejection of 99.6% and 98.5% for a quasar efficiency of, respectively, 50% and 85%. The photometric redshift precision is of the order of 0.1 over the region relevant for BAO studies.
  • We present 139 spectra of 124 Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) that were observed at the ESO/VLT during the first three years of the Canada-France-Hawai Telescope (CFHT) Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). This homogeneous data set is used to test for redshift evolution of SNeIa spectra, and will be used in the SNLS 3rd year cosmological analyses. Spectra have been reduced and extracted with a dedicated pipeline that uses photometric information from deep CFHT Legacy Survey (CFHT-LS) reference images to trace, at sub-pixel accuracy, the position of the supernova on the spectrogram as a function of wavelength. It also separates the supernova and its host light in 60% of cases. The identification of the supernova candidates is performed using a spectrophotometric SNIa model. A total of 124 SNeIa, roughly 50% of the overall SNLS spectroscopic sample, have been identified using the ESO/VLT during the first three years of the survey. Their redshifts range from z=0.149 to z=1.031. The average redshift of the sample is z=0.63+/-0.02. This constitutes the largest SNIa spectral set to date in this redshift range. The spectra are presented along with their best-fit spectral SNIa model and a host model where relevant. In the latter case, a host subtracted spectrum is also presented. We produce average spectra for pre-maximum, maximum and post-maximum epochs for both z<0.5 and z>=0.5 SNeIa. We find that z<0.5 spectra have deeper intermediate mass element absorptions than z>= 0.5 spectra. The differences with redshift are consistent with the selection of brighter and bluer supernovae at higher redshift.