• We revisit the properties and astrophysical implications of the field white dwarf mass distribution in preparation of Gaia applications. Our study is based on the two samples with the best established completeness and most precise atmospheric parameters, the volume-complete survey within 20 pc and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) magnitude-limited sample. We explore the modelling of the observed mass distributions with Monte Carlo simulations, but find that it is difficult to constrain independently the initial mass function (IMF), the initial-to-final-mass relation (IFMR), the stellar formation history (SFH), the variation of the Galactic disk vertical scale height as a function of stellar age, and binary evolution. Each of these input ingredients has a moderate effect on the predicted mass distributions, and we must also take into account biases owing to unidentified faint objects (20 pc sample), as well as unknown masses for magnetic white dwarfs and spectroscopic calibration issues (SDSS sample). Nevertheless, we find that fixed standard assumptions for the above parameters result in predicted mean masses that are in good qualitative agreement with the observed values. It suggests that derived masses for both studied samples are consistent with our current knowledge of stellar and Galactic evolution. Our simulations overpredict by 40-50% the number of massive white dwarfs (M > 0.75 Msun) for both surveys, although we can not exclude a Salpeter IMF when we account for all biases. Furthermore, we find no evidence of a population of double white dwarf mergers in the observed mass distributions.
  • The study of the stellar formation history in the solar neighborhood is a powerful technique to recover information about the early stages and evolution of the Milky Way. We present a new method which consists of directly probing the formation history from the nearby stellar remnants. We rely on the volume complete sample of white dwarfs within 20 pc, where accurate cooling ages and masses have been determined. The well characterized initial-final mass relation is employed in order to recover the initial masses (1 < M/Msun < 8) and total ages for the local degenerate sample. We correct for moderate biases that are necessary to transform our results to a global stellar formation rate, which can be compared to similar studies based on the properties of main-sequence stars in the solar neighborhood. Our method provides precise formation rates for all ages except in very recent times, and the results suggest an enhanced formation rate for the solar neighborhood in the last 5 Gyr compared to the range 5 < Age (Gyr) < 10. Furthermore, the observed total age of ~10 Gyr for the oldest white dwarfs in the local sample is consistent with the early seminal studies that have determined the age of the Galactic disk from stellar remnants. The main shortcoming of our study is the small size of the local white dwarf sample. However, the presented technique can be applied to larger samples in the future.
  • We have identified eight to ten new cool white dwarfs from the Large Area Survey (LAS) Data Release 9 of the United Kingdom InfraRed Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). The data set was paired with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to obtain proper motions and a broad ugrizYJHK wavelength coverage. Optical spectroscopic observations were secured at Gemini Observatory and confirm the degenerate status for eight of our targets. The final sample includes two additional white dwarf candidates with no spectroscopic observations. We rely on improved 1D model atmospheres and new multi-dimensional simulations with CO5BOLD to review the stellar parameters of the published LAS white dwarf sample along with our additional discoveries. Most of the new objects possess very cool atmospheres with effective temperatures below 5000 K, including two pure-hydrogen remnants with a cooling age between 8.5 and 9.0 Gyr, and tangential velocities in the range 40 km/s < vtan < 60 km/s. They are likely thick disk 10-11 Gyr-old objects. In addition we find a resolved double degenerate system with vtan ~ 155 km/s and a cooling age between 3.0 and 5.0 Gyr. These white dwarfs could be disk remnants with a very high velocity or former halo G stars. We also compare the LAS sample with earlier studies of very cool degenerates and observe a similar deficit of helium-dominated atmospheres in the range 5000 < Teff (K) < 6000. We review the possible explanations for the spectral evolution from helium-dominated towards hydrogen-rich atmospheres at low temperatures.
  • The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) is an on-going HST Multicycle Treasury program to image ~1/3 of M31's star forming disk in 6 filters, from the UV to the NIR. The full survey will resolve the galaxy into more than 100 million stars with projected radii from 0-20 kpc over a contiguous 0.5 square degree area in 828 orbits, producing imaging in the F275W and F336W filters with WFC3/UVIS, F475W and F814W with ACS/WFC, and F110W and F160W with WFC3/IR. The resulting wavelength coverage gives excellent constraints on stellar temperature, bolometric luminosity, and extinction for most spectral types. The photometry reaches SNR=4 at F275W=25.1, F336W=24.9, F475W=27.9, F814W=27.1, F110W=25.5, and F160W=24.6 for single pointings in the uncrowded outer disk; however, the optical and NIR data are crowding limited, and the deepest reliable magnitudes are up to 5 magnitudes brighter in the inner bulge. All pointings are dithered and produce Nyquist-sampled images in F475W, F814W, and F160W. We describe the observing strategy, photometry, astrometry, and data products, along with extensive tests of photometric stability, crowding errors, spatially-dependent photometric biases, and telescope pointing control. We report on initial fits to the structure of M31's disk, derived from the density of RGB stars, in a way that is independent of the assumed M/L and is robust to variations in dust extinction. These fits also show that the 10 kpc ring is not just a region of enhanced recent star formation, but is instead a dynamical structure containing a significant overdensity of stars with ages >1 Gyr. (Abridged)
  • Supernova (SN) 2009ig was discovered 17 hours after explosion by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search, promptly classified as a normal Type Ia SN (SN Ia), peaked at V = 13.5 mag, and was equatorial, making it one of the foremost supernovae for intensive study in the last decade. Here, we present ultraviolet (UV) and optical observations of SN 2009ig, starting about 1 day after explosion until around maximum brightness. Our data include excellent UV and optical light curves, 25 premaximum optical spectra, and 8 UV spectra, including the earliest UV spectrum ever obtained of a SN Ia. SN 2009ig is a relatively normal SN Ia, but does display high-velocity ejecta - the ejecta velocity measured in our earliest spectra (v ~ -23,000 km/s for Si II 6355) is the highest yet measured in a SN Ia. The spectral evolution is very dramatic at times earlier than 12 days before maximum brightness, but slows after that time. The early-time data provide a precise measurement of 17.13 +/- 0.07 days for the SN rise time. The optical color curves and early-time spectra are significantly different from template light curves and spectra used for light-curve fitting and K-corrections, indicating that the template light curves and spectra do not properly represent all Type Ia supernovae at very early times. In the age of wide-angle sky surveys, SNe like SN 2009ig that are nearby, bright, well positioned, and promptly discovered will still be rare. As shown with SN 2009ig, detailed studies of single events can provide significantly more information for testing systematic uncertainties related to SN Ia distance estimates and constraining progenitor and explosion models than large samples of more distant SNe.
  • We review at length the longstanding problem in the spectroscopic analysis of cool hydrogen-line (DA) white dwarfs (Teff < 13,000 K) where gravities are significantly higher than those found in hotter DA stars. The first solution that has been proposed for this problem is a mild and systematic helium contamination from convective mixing that would mimic the high gravities. We constrain this scenario by determining the helium abundances in six cool DA white dwarfs using high-resolution spectra from the Keck I 10-m telescope. We obtain no detections, with upper limits as low as He/H = 0.04 in some cases. This allows us to put this scenario to rest for good. We also extend our model grid to lower temperatures using improved Stark profiles with non-ideal gas effects from Tremblay & Bergeron and find that the gravity distribution of cool objects remains suspiciously high. Finally, we find that photometric masses are, on average, in agreement with expected values, and that the high-log g problem is so far unique to the spectroscopic approach.
  • The quasar SDSS J105041.35+345631.3 (z = 0.272) has broad emission lines blueshifted by 3500 km/s relative to the narrow lines and the host galaxy. Such an object may be a candidate for a recoiling supermassive black hole, binary black hole, a superposition of two objects, or an unusual geometry for the broad emission-line region. The absence of narrow lines at the broad line redshift argues against superposition. New Keck spectra of J1050+3546 place tight constraints on the binary model. The combination of large velocity shift and symmetrical H-beta profile, as well as aspects of the narrow line spectrum, make J1050+3546 an interesting candidate for black hole recoil. Other aspects of the spectrum, however, suggest that the object is most likely an extreme case of a ``double-peaked emitter.'' We discuss possible observational tests to determine the true nature of this exceptional object.
  • We present a photometric survey of the stellar halo of the Andromeda galaxy, using Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. A detailed analysis of VI color-magnitude diagrams of the resolved stellar population is used to measure properties such as line-of-sight distance, surface brightness, metallicity, and age, and these are used to isolate and characterize different components of the M31 halo: (1) several substructures, and (2) the smooth halo. First, we study M31's halo substructure along the north-west/south-east minor axis out to R ~ 100 kpc and the south-west major axis region at R ~ 60 kpc. We confirm two substructures in the south-east halo reported by Ibata et al. (2007) and discover two overdense substructures in the north-west halo. We investigate the properties of these four substructures as well as other structures including the western shelf and find that differences in stellar populations among these systems, thereby suggesting each has a different origin. Our statistical analysis implies that the M31 halo as a whole may contain at least 16 substructures, each with a different origin. Second, we investigate the properties of an underlying, smooth and extended halo component out to R > 100 kpc. We find that the surface density of this smooth halo can be fitted to a Hernquist model of scale radius ~ 17 kpc or a power-law profile with ~ R^{-2.17 +/- 0.15}. In contrast to the relative smoothness of the halo density profile, its metallicity distribution appears to be spatially non-uniform with non-monotonic variations with radius, suggesting that the halo population has not had sufficient time to dynamically homogenize the accreted populations. Further implications for the formation of the M31 halo are discussed.
  • We have conducted a deep ($15 \la r \la 23$), 20 night survey for transiting planets in the intermediate age ($\sim 550 {\rm Myr}$) open cluster M37 (NGC 2099) using the Megacam wide-field mosaic CCD camera on the 6.5m Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT). In this paper we present a catalog and light curves for 1445 variable stars; 1430 (99%) of these are new discoveries. We have discovered 20 new eclipsing binaries and 31 new short period ($P < 1 {\rm day}$) pulsating stars. The bulk of the variables are most likely rapidly rotating young low-mass stars, including a substantial number ($\ga 500$) that are members of the cluster. We identify and analyze five particularly interesting individual variables including a previously identified variable which we suggest is probably a hybrid $\gamma$ Doradus/$\delta$ Scuti pulsator, two possible quiescent cataclysmic variables, a detached eclipsing binary (DEB) with at least one $\gamma$ Doradus pulsating component (only the second such variable found in an eclipsing binary), and a low mass ($M_{P} \sim M_{S} \sim 0.6 M_{\odot}$) DEB that is a possible cluster member. A preliminary determination of the physical parameters for the DEB+$\gamma$ Doradus system yields $M_{P} = 1.58 \pm 0.04 M_{\odot}$, $M_{S} = 1.58 \pm 0.04 M_{\odot}$, $R_{P} = 1.39 \pm 0.07 R_{\odot}$ and $R_{S} = 1.38 \pm 0.07 R_{\odot}$.
  • We have examined the radial distribution of white dwarfs over a single HST/ACS field in the nearby globular cluster NGC 6397. In relaxed populations, such as in a globular cluster, stellar velocity dispersion, and hence radial distribution, is directly dependent on stellar masses. The progenitors of very young cluster white dwarfs had a mass of ~0.8 solar masses, while the white dwarfs themselves have a mass of ~0.5 solar masses. We thus expect young white dwarfs to have a concentrated radial distribution (like that of their progenitors) that becomes more extended over several relaxation times to mimic that of ~0.5 solar mass main-sequence stars. However, we observe young white dwarfs to have a significantly extended radial distribution compared to both the most massive main sequence stars in the cluster and also to old white dwarfs.
  • We present spectroscopic observations of red giant branch (RGB) stars over a large expanse in the halo of the Andromeda spiral galaxy (M31), acquired with the DEIMOS instrument on the Keck II 10-m telescope. Using a combination of five photometric/spectroscopic diagnostics -- (1) radial velocity, (2) intermediate-width DDO51 photometry, (3) Na I equivalent width (surface gravity sensitive), (4) position in the color-magnitude diagram, and (5) comparison between photometric and spectroscopic [Fe/H] estimates -- we isolate over 250 bona fide M31 bulge and halo RGB stars located in twelve fields ranging from R = 12-165kpc from the center of M31 (47 of these stars are halo members with R > 60 kpc). We derive the photometric and spectroscopic metallicity distribution function of M31 RGB stars in each of these fields. The mean of the resulting M31 spheroid (bulge and halo) metallicity distribution is found to be systematically more metal-poor with increasing radius, shifting from <[Fe/H]> = -0.47+/-0.03 (sigma = 0.39) at R < 20 kpc to <[Fe/H]> = -0.94+/-0.06 (sigma = 0.60) at R ~ 30 kpc to <[Fe/H]> = -1.26+/-0.10 (sigma = 0.72) at R > 60 kpc, assuming [alpha/Fe] = 0.0. These results indicate the presence of a metal-poor RGB population at large radial distances out to at least R = 160 kpc, thereby supporting our recent discovery of a stellar halo in M31: its halo and bulge (defined as the structural components with R^{-2} power law and de Vaucouleurs R^{1/4} law surface brightness profiles, respectively) are shown to have distinct metallicity distributions. If we assume an alpha-enhancement of [alpha/Fe] = +0.3 for M31's halo, we derive <[Fe/H]> = -1.5+/-0.1 (sigma = 0.7). Therefore, the mean metallicity and metallicity spread of this newly found remote M31 RGB population are similar to those of the Milky Way halo.
  • We present spectroscopic observations of red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Andromeda spiral galaxy (M31), acquired with the DEIMOS instrument on the Keck II 10-m telescope. The three fields targeted in this study are in the M31 spheroid, outer disk, and giant southern stream. In this paper, we focus on the kinematics and chemical composition of RGB stars in the stream field located at a projected distance of R = 20 kpc from M31's center. A mix of stellar populations is found in this field. M31 RGB stars are isolated from Milky Way dwarf star contaminants using a variety of spectral and photometric diagnostics. The radial velocity distribution of RGB stars displays a clear bimodality -- a primary peak centered at v = -513 km/s and a secondary one at v = -417 km/s -- along with an underlying broad component that is presumably representative of the smooth spheroid of M31. Both peaks are found to be dynamically cold with intrinsic velocity dispersions of sigma(v) = 16 km/s. The mean metallicity and metallicity dispersion of stars in the two peaks is also found to be similar: [Fe/H] = -0.45 and sigma([Fe/H]) = 0.2. The observed velocity of the primary peak is consistent with that predicted by dynamical models for the stream, but there is no obvious explanation for the secondary peak. The nature of the secondary cold population is unclear: it may represent: (1) tidal debris from a satellite merger event that is superimposed on, but unrelated to, the giant southern stream; (2) a wrapped around component of the giant southern stream; (3) a warp or overdensity in M31's disk at R > 50 kpc (this component is well above the outward extrapolation of the smooth exponential disk brightness profile).