• We present ALMA 850 $\mu$m continuum observations of the Orion Nebula Cluster that provide the highest angular resolution ($\sim 0\rlap{.}''1 \approx 40$ AU) and deepest sensitivity ($\sim 0.1$ mJy) of the region to date. We mosaicked a field containing $\sim 225$ optical or near-IR-identified young stars, $\sim 60$ of which are also optically-identified "proplyds". We detect continuum emission at 850 $\mu$m towards $\sim 80$% of the proplyd sample, and $\sim 50$% of the larger sample of previously-identified cluster members. Detected objects have fluxes of $\sim 0.5$-80 mJy. We remove sub-mm flux due to free-free emission in some objects, leaving a sample of sources detected in dust emission. Under standard assumptions of isothermal, optically thin disks, sub-mm fluxes correspond to dust masses of $\sim 0.5$ to 80 Earth masses. We measure the distribution of disk sizes, and find that disks in this region are particularly compact. Such compact disks are likely to be significantly optically thick. The distributions of sub-mm flux and inferred disk size indicate smaller, lower-flux disks than in lower-density star-forming regions of similar age. Measured disk flux is correlated weakly with stellar mass, contrary to studies in other star forming regions that found steeper correlations. We find a correlation between disk flux and distance from the massive star $\theta^1$ Ori C, suggesting that disk properties in this region are influenced strongly by the rich cluster environment.
  • We report $^{75}$As nuclear magnetic resonance study in LaFeAsO single crystals, which undergoes nematic and antiferromagnetic transitions at $T_\text{nem}\sim 156$ K and $T_N \sim 138$ K, respectively. Below $T_\text{nem}$, the $^{75}$As spectrum splits sharply into two for an external magnetic field parallel to the orthorhombic $a$ or $b$ axis in the FeAs planes. Our analysis of the data demonstrates that the NMR line splitting arises from an electronically driven rotational symmetry breaking. The $^{75}$As spin-lattice relaxation rate as a function of temperature shows that spin fluctuations are strongly enhanced just below $T_\text{nem}$. These NMR findings indicate that nematic order promotes spin fluctuations in magnetically ordered LaFeAsO, as observed in non-magnetic and superconducting FeSe. We conclude that the origin of nematicity is identical in both FeSe and LaFeAsO regardless of whether or not a long range magnetic order develops in the nematic state.
  • In this work, we present limits on natural supersymmetry scenarios based on searches in data taken during run 1 of the LHC. We consider a set of 22000 model points in a six dimensional parameter space. These scenarios are minimal in the sense of only keeping those superparticles relatively light that are required to cancel the leading quadratically divergent quantum corrections (from the top and QCD sector) to the Higgs mass in the Standard Model. The resulting mass spectra feature higgsinos as the lightest supersymmetric particle, as well as relatively light third generation $SU(2)$ doublet squarks and $SU(2)$ singlet stops and gluinos while assuming a Standard Model like Higgs boson. All remaining supersymmetric particles and Higgs bosons are assumed to be decoupled. We check each parameter set against a large number of LHC searches as implemented in the public code {\tt CheckMATE}. These searches show a considerable degree of complementarity, i.e. in general many searches have to be considered in order to check whether a given scenario is allowed. We delineate allowed and excluded regions in parameter space. For example, we find that all scenarios where either $m_{\tilde t_1} < 230$ GeV or $m_{\tilde g} < 440$ GeV are clearly excluded, while all model points where $m_{\tilde t_1} > 660$ GeV and $m_{\tilde g} > 1180$ GeV remain allowed.
  • The recent study of $^{77}$Se nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in a $\beta$-FeSe single crystal proposed that ferro-orbital order breaks the $90^\circ$ $C_4$ rotational symmetry, driving nematic ordering. Here, we report an NMR study of the impact of small strains generated by gluing on nematic state and spin fluctuations. We observe that the local strains strongly affect the nematic transition, considerably enhancing its onset temperature. On the contrary, no effect on low-energy spin fluctuations was found. Furthermore we investigate the interplay of the nematic phase and superconductivity. Our study demonstrates that the twinned nematic domains respond unequivalently to superconductivity, evidencing the twofold $C_2$ symmetry of superconductivity in this material. The obtained results are well understood in terms of the proposed ferro-orbital order.
  • Motivated by the recent diphoton excesses reported by both ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we suggest that a new heavy spinless particle is produced in gluon fusion at the LHC and decays to a couple of lighter pseudoscalars which then decay to photons. The new resonances could arise from a new strongly interacting sector and couple to Standard Model gauge bosons only via the corresponding Wess-Zumino-Witten anomaly. We present a detailed recast of the newest 13 TeV data from ATLAS and CMS together with the 8 TeV data to scan the consistency of the parameter space for those resonances.
  • One of the goals in understanding any new class of superconductors is to search for commonalities with other known superconductors. The present work investigates the superconducting condensation energy, U, in the iron based superconductors (IBS), and compares their U with a broad range of other distinct classes of superconductor, including conventional BCS elements and compounds and the unconventional heavy Fermion, Sr2RuO4, Li0.1ZrNCl, kappa-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu(NCS)2 and optimally doped cuprate superconductors. Surprisingly, both the magnitude and Tc dependence (U=0.1Tc**3.4 +- 0.2) of U are, contrary to the previously observed behavior of the specific heat discontinuity at Tc, deltaC, quite similar in the IBS and BCS materials for Tc>1.4 K. In contrast, the heavy Fermion superconductors U vs Tc are strongly (up to a factor of 100) enhanced above the IBS/BCS while the cuprate superconductors U are strongly (factor of 8) reduced. However, scaling of U with the specific heat gamma (or deltaC) brings all the superconductors investigated onto one universal dependence upon Tc. This apparent universal scaling U/gamma = 0.2Tc**2 for all superconductor classes investigated, both weak and strong coupled and both conventional and unconventional, links together extremely disparate behaviors over almost seven orders of magnitude for U and almost three orders of magnitude for Tc. Since U has not yet been explicitly calculated beyond the weak coupling limit, the present results can help direct theoretical efforts into the medium and strong coupling regimes.
  • A superconducting transition temperature Tc as high as 100 K was recently discovered in 1 monolayer (1ML) FeSe grown on SrTiO3 (STO). The discovery immediately ignited efforts to identify the mechanism for the dramatically enhanced Tc from its bulk value of 7 K. Currently, there are two main views on the origin of the enhanced Tc; in the first view, the enhancement comes from an interfacial effect while in the other it is from excess electrons with strong correlation strength. The issue is controversial and there are evidences that support each view. Finding the origin of the Tc enhancement could be the key to achieving even higher Tc and to identifying the microscopic mechanism for the superconductivity in iron-based materials. Here, we report the observation of 20 K superconductivity in the electron doped surface layer of FeSe. The electronic state of the surface layer possesses all the key spectroscopic aspects of the 1ML FeSe on STO. Without any interface effect, the surface layer state is found to have a moderate Tc of 20 K with a smaller gap opening of 4 meV. Our results clearly show that excess electrons with strong correlation strength alone cannot induce the maximum Tc, which in turn strongly suggests need for an interfacial effect to reach the enhanced Tc found in 1ML FeSe/STO.
  • Co-doped BaFe2As2 has been previously shown to have an unusually significant improvement of Tc (up to 2 K, or almost 10%) with annealing 1-2 weeks at 700 or 800 C, where such annealing conditions are insufficient to allow significant atomic diffusion. While confirming similar behavior in optimally Co-doped SrFe2As2 samples, the influence on Tc of strain induced by grinding to ~50 micron sized particles, followed by pressing the powder into a pellet using 10 kbar pressure, was found to increase the annealed transition width of 1.5 K by approximately a factor of ten. Also, the bulk discontinuity in the specific heat at Tc, deltaC, on the same pellet sample was completely suppressed by grinding. This evidence for a strong sensitivity of superconductivity to strain was used to optimize single crystal growth of Co-doped BaFe2As2. This strong dependence (both positive via annealing and negative via grinding) of superconductivity on strain in these two iron based 122 structure superconductors is compared to the unconventional heavy Fermion superconductor UPt3, where grinding is known to completely suppress superconductivity, and to recent reports of strong sensitivity of Tc to damage induced by electron-irradiation-induced point defects in other 122 structure iron-based superconductors, Ba(Fe0.76Ru0.24)2As2 and Ba1-xKxFe2As2. Both the electron irradiation and the introduction of strain by grinding are believed to only introduce non-magnetic defects, and argue for unconventional superconducting pairing.
  • The pairing symmetry in the iron-based superconductor Ba1-xKxFe2As2 may change from nodeless s-wave near x~0.4 and Tc>30 K, to nodal (either d-wave or s-wave) at x=1 and Tc<4 K. Theoretical interest has been focused on this possibility, where in the transition region both order parameters would be present and time reversal symmetry would be broken. We report specific heat in magnetic fields down to 0.4 K of three single crystals, free of low temperature magnetic anomalies, of heavily overdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2, x= 0.91, 0.88, and 0.81, Tc(mid) ~ 5.6, 7.2 and 13 K and Hc2 ~ 4.5, 6, and 20 T respectively. The data can be analyzed in a two gap scenario, Delta2/Delta1 ~ 4, with the field dependence of gamma (=C/T as T->0) showing an S-shape vs H, with the suppression of the lower gap by 1 T and gamma ~ H**1/2 overall. Although such a non-linear gamma vs H is consistent with deep minima or nodes in the gap, it is not clear evidence for one, or both, of the gaps being nodal. Following the established analysis of the specific heat of d-wave cuprate superconductors containing line nodes, we present the specific heat/H**1/2 vs T/H**1/2 of these Ba1-xKxFe2As2 samples which all, due to the absence of magnetic impurities, convincingly show the scaling for line node behavior for the larger gap. There is however no clear observation of the nodal behavior C ~ alpha*T**2 in zero field at low temperatures, with alpha ~ 2 mJ/molK**3 being consistent with the data. This, with the scaling, leaves the possibility of extreme anisotropy in a nodeless larger gap, Delta2, such that the scaling works for fields above 0.25 to 0.5 T (0.2 to 0.4 K in temperature units), where this an estimate for the size of the deep minima in the Delta2 ~ 20-25 K gap. Thus, the change from nodeless to nodal gaps in Ba1-xKxFe2As2 may be closer to the KFe2As2 endpoint than x=0.91.
  • Infrared Dark Clouds are ideal laboratories to study the initial processes of high-mass star and star cluster formation. We investigated star formation activity of an unexplored filamentary dark cloud (~5.7pc x 1.9pc), which itself is part of a large filament (~20pc) located in the S254-S258 OB complex at a distance of 2.5kpc. Using MIPS Spitzer 24 micron data, we uncover 49 sources with SNR greater than 5. We identified 45 sources as candidate YSOs of Class I, Flat-spectrum & Class II nature. Additional 17 candidate YSOs (9 Class I & 8 Class II) are also identified using JHK and WISE photometry. We find that the protostar to Class II sources ratio (~2) and the protostar fraction (~70%) of the region are high. When the protostar fraction compared to other young clusters, it suggests that the star formation in the dark cloud was possibly started only 1 Myr ago. Combining the NIR photometry of the YSO candidates with the theoretical evolutionary models, we infer that most of the candidate YSOs formed in the dark cloud are low-mass (<2 Msolar) in nature. We examine the spatial distribution of the YSOs and find that majority of them are linearly aligned along the highest column density line (N(H2) ~1 x 10^22 cm^-2) of the dark cloud along its long axis at mean nearest neighbor separation of ~0.2pc. Using observed properties of the YSOs, physical conditions of the cloud and a simple cylindrical model, we explore the possible star formation process of this filamentary dark cloud and suggest that gravitational fragmentation within the filament should have played a dominant role in the formation of the YSOs. From the total mass of the YSOs, gaseous mass associated with the dark cloud, and surrounding environment, we infer that the region is presently forming stars at an efficiency ~3% and a rate ~30 Msolar Myr^-1, and may emerge to a richer cluster.
  • A very fundamental and unconventional characteristic of superconductivity in iron-based materials is that it occurs in the vicinity of {\it two} other instabilities. Apart from a tendency towards magnetic order, these Fe-based systems have a propensity for nematic ordering: a lowering of the rotational symmetry while time-reversal invariance is preserved. Setting the stage for superconductivity, it is heavily debated whether the nematic symmetry breaking is driven by lattice, orbital or spin degrees of freedom. Here we report a very clear splitting of NMR resonance lines in FeSe at $T_{nem}$ = 91K, far above superconducting $T_c$ of 9.3 K. The splitting occurs for magnetic fields perpendicular to the Fe-planes and has the temperature dependence of a Landau-type order-parameter. Spin-lattice relaxation rates are not affected at $T_{nem}$, which unequivocally establishes orbital degrees of freedom as driving the nematic order. We demonstrate that superconductivity competes with the emerging nematicity.
  • The specific heat of single crystal hole-doped Ca0.33Na0.67Fe2As2, Tc(onset)=33.7 K, was measured from 0.4 to 40 K. The discontinuity in the specific heat at Tc, deltaC, divided by Tc is 105 +- 5 mJ/molK2, consistent with values found previously for hole-doped Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and somewhat above the general trend for deltaC/Tc vs Tc for the iron based superconductors established by Bud'ko, Ni and Canfield. The usefulness of measured valued of deltaC/Tc as an important metric for the quality of samples is discussed.
  • Heavy Fermion physics deals with the ground state formation and interactions in f-electron materials where the electron effective masses are extremely large, more than 100 times the rest mass of an electron. The details of how the f-electrons correlate at low temperature to become so massive lacks a coherent theory, partially because so few materials display this heavy behavior and thus global trends remain unclear. UHg_{3} is now found experimentally to be a heavy Fermion antiferromagnet, just as are all the other U_{x}M_{y} compounds with the metal M being in column II B (filled d electron shells) in the periodic table (Zn/Cd/Hg) and the spacing between Uranium ions being greater than the Hill limit of 3.5 Angstroms. This result that, independent of the structure of these U_{x}M_{y}, M=Zn/Cd/Hg, compounds and independent of the value of their Uranium Uranium spacings (ranging from 4.39 to 6.56 Angstroms), all exhibit heavy Fermion antiferromagnetism, is a clear narrowing of the parameters important for understanding the formation of this ground state. The sequence of antiferromagnetic transition temperatures, T_{Neel}, of 9.7 K, 5.0 K, and 2.6 K for U_{x}M_{y} as the metal M varies down column II B (Zn/Cd/Hg) indicates an interesting regularity for the antiferromagnetic coupling strength.
  • The construction of a new detector is proposed to extend the capabilities of ALICE in the high transverse momentum (pT) region. This Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (VHMPID) performs charged hadron identification on a track-by-track basis in the 5 GeV/c < p < 25 GeV/c momentum range and provides ALICE with new opportunities to study parton-medium interactions at LHC energies. The VHMPID covers up to 30% of the ALICE central barrel and presents sufficient acceptance for triggered- and tagged-jet studies, allowing for the first time identified charged hadron measurements in jets. This Letter of Intent summarizes the physics motivations for such a detector as well as its layout and integration into ALICE.
  • We consider the discovery potential of light stops in the MSSM at the LHC. Here, we assume that the lightest neutralino is the LSP and that the lighter stop is the NLSP. Direct stop pair production is difficult to probe in scenarios with a small mass splitting between the stop and a neutralino. We discuss two different search channels: the monojet and the two $b$--flavoured jets and large missing transverse energy signature. We present the discovery reach in the stop--neutralino mass plane for both channels. The latter process is sensitive to the stop--higgsino--$b$ quark coupling. This allows us to test a supersymmetry relation involving superpotential couplings. We briefly comment on the possible precision with which the coupling can be measured.
  • In a recent paper, we proposed a hierarchical ansatz for the lepton-number-violating trilinear Yukawa couplings of the R-parity-violating minimal supersymmetric standard model. As a result, the number of free parameters in the lepton-number-violating sector was reduced from 36 to 6. Neutrino oscillation data fixes these six parameters, which also uniquely determines the decay modes of the lightest supersymmetric particle and thus governs the collider signature at the LHC. A typical signature of our model consists of multiple leptons in the final state and significantly reduced missing transverse momentum compared to models with R-parity conservation. In this work, we present exclusion limits on our model based on multilepton searches performed at the Large Hadron Collider with 7 TeV center-of-mass energy in 2011 while accommodating a 125 GeV Higgs.
  • Point contact spectroscopy (PCS) is a technique which can reveal the size and symmetry of a superconducting gap ($\Delta$) and is especially useful for new materials such as the iron-based superconductors. PCS is usually employed in conjunction with the extended Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) model which is used to extract information such as the existence of nodes in $\Delta$ from PCS data obtained on unconventional superconductors. The BTK model uses a dimensionless parameter $Z$ to quantify the barrier strength across a normal metal - superconductor junction. We have used a unique feature of PCS which allows variation of $Z$ to obtain crucial information about $\Delta$. We report our $Z$-dependent, $a-b$ plane PCS measurements on single crystals of the iron-based superconductor BaFe$_{2-x}$Co$_{x}$As$_{2}$. Our measurements show that BaFe$_{2-x}$Co$_{x}$As$_{2}$ ($x$=0.148) is a superconductor with two gaps which does not contain any nodes. The $Z$ dependent point contact spectra rule out a pure $d$ symmetry and the gaps at optimal doping have negligible anisotropy.
  • LiFeAs is one of the new class of iron superconductors with a bulk onset Tc in the 15-17 K range. We report on the specific heat characterization of single crystal material prepared from self-flux growth techniques with significantly improved properties, including a much decreased residual gamma (proportional to C/T as T->0) in the superconducting state. Thus, in contrast to previous explanations of a finite residual gamma in LiFeAs being due to intrinsic states in the superconducting gap, the present work shows that such a finite residual gamma in LiFeAs is instead a function of sample quality. Further, since LiFeAs has been characterized as nodeless with multiple superconducting gaps, we report here on its specific heat properties in zero and applied magnetic fields to compare to similar results on nodal iron superconductors. For comparison, we also investigate LiFe0.98Cu0.02As, which has the reduced Tc of 9 K and Hc2 of 15 T. Interestingly, although presumably both LiFeAs and LiFe0.98Cu0.02As are nodeless, they clearly show a non-linear dependence of the electronic density of states (proportional to the specific heat gamma) at the Fermi energy in the mixed state with applied field similar to the Volovik effect for nodal superconductors. However, rather than nodal behavior, the satisfactory comparison with a recent theory for gamma(H) for a two isotropic gap superconductor in the presence of impurities argues for nodeless behavior. Thus, in terms of specific heat in magnetic field, LiFeAs can serve as the prototypical multiband, nodeless iron superconductor.
  • We use $^{75}$As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to investigate the local electronic properties of Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Ru$_{x}$)$_2$As$_2$ ($x =$ 0.23). We find two phase transitions, to antiferromagnetism at $T_N \approx$ 60 K and to superconductivity at $T_C \approx$ 15 K. Below $T_N$, our data show that the system is fully magnetic, with a commensurate antiferromagnetic structure and a moment of 0.4 $\mu_B$/Fe. The spin-lattice relaxation rate $1/^{75}T_1$ is large in the magnetic state, indicating a high density of itinerant electrons induced by Ru doping. On cooling below $T_C$, $1/^{75}T_1$ on the magnetic sites falls sharply, providing unambiguous evidence for the microscopic coexistence of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity.
  • We fabricated GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots by droplet epitaxy method, and obtained the geometries of the dots from scanning transmission electron microscopy data. Post-thermal annealing is essential for the optical activation of quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy. We investigated the emission energy shifts of the dots and underlying superlattice by post-thermal annealing with photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence measurements, and specified the emissions from the dots by selectively etching the structure down to a lower layer of quantum dots. We studied the influences of the degree of annealing on the optical properties of the dots from the peak shifts of the superlattice, which has the same composition as the dots, since the superlattice has uniform and well-defined geometry. Theoretical analysis provided the diffusion length dependence of the peak shifts of the emission spectra.
  • The low temperature specific heat of annealed single crystal samples of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 with compositions spanning the entire superconducting phase diagram was measured. Effort was made to discover the best annealing schedule to maximize Tc and minimize transition width in these samples. Values of deltaC/Tc normalized to 100% superconducting volume fractions varied proportionally to Tc^alpha. Within a rather narrow error bar of +-0.15, the exponent alpha was the same (approximately 2) over a range of compositions (0.055 < x < 0.15) around the optimal concentration, x=0.08, where Tc is the maximum in the phase diagram. Thus, whether the superconductivity was coexistent with magnetism (underdoped) or not (overdoped) did not affect the non-BCS variation (alpha nearly 2 instead of 0.8-0.9 for BCS superconductors) of deltaC/Tc with Tc. The annealed samples in the present work, with increased deltaC/Tc and Tc values compared to previous results for the Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 alloy system, suggest that the intrinsic value of the exponent alpha for the iron superconductors, when the samples are annealed, with fewer defects, may indeed be even further from the BCS value of 0.8-0.9 than previously thought.
  • Within the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), we use a hierarchical ansatz for the lepton-number violating trilinear Yukawa couplings by relating them to the corresponding Higgs-Yukawa couplings. This ansatz reduces the number of free parameters in the lepton-number violating sector from 36 to 6. Baryon-number violating terms are forbidden by imposing the discrete gauge symmetry Baryon Triality. We fit the lepton-number violating parameters to the most recent neutrino oscillation data, including the mixing angle theta13 found by Daya Bay. We find that we obtain phenomenologically viable neutrino masses and mixings only in the case of normal ordered neutrino masses and that the lepton-number violating sector is unambiguously determined by neutrino oscillation data. We discuss the resulting collider signals for the case of a neutralino as well as a scalar tau lightest supersymmetric particle. We use the ATLAS searches for multi-jet events and large transverse missing momentum in the 0, 1 and 2 lepton channel with 7 TeV center-of-mass energy in order to derive exclusion limits on the parameter space of this R-parity violating supersymmetric model.
  • Low temperature specific heat, C, in magnetic fields up to Hc2 is reported for underdoped Ba(Fe0.955Co0.045)2As2 (Tc=8 K) and for three overdoped samples Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 (x=0.103, 0.13, and 0.15, Tc=17.2, 16.5, and 11.7 K respectively). Previous measurements of thermal conductivity (as a function of temperature and field) and penetration depth on comparable composition samples gave some disagreement as to whether there was fully gapped/nodal behavior in the under-/overdoped materials respectively. The present work shows that the measured behavior of the specific heat gamma (proportional to C/T as T->0, i. e. a measure of the electronic density of states at the Fermi energy) as a function of field approximately obeys gamma proportional to H**(0.5 +- 0.1), similar to the Volovik effect for nodal superconductors, for both the underdoped and the most overdoped Co samples. However, for the two overdoped compositions x=0.103 and 0.13, the low field (H < 10 T) data show a Volovik-like behavior of gamma proportional to H**(0.3-0.4), followed by an inflection point, followed at higher fields by gamma proportional to H**1. We argue that within the 2-band theory of superconductivity, an inflection point may occur if the interband coupling is dominant.
  • A new multiferroic material, CuBr2, is reported for the first time. CuBr2 has not only a high transition temperature (close to liquid nitrogen temperature) but also low dielectric loss and strong magnetoelectric coupling. These findings reveal the importance of anion effects in the search for the high temperature multiferroics materials among these low-dimensional spin systems.
  • The phase diagrams of EuFe$_{2-x}$Co$_x$As$_2$ $(0 \leq x \leq 0.4)$ and EuFe$_2$As$_{2-y}$P$_y$ $(0 \leq y \leq 0.43)$ are investigated by Eu$^{2+}$ electron spin resonance (ESR) in single crystals. From the temperature dependence of the linewidth $\Delta H(T)$ of the exchange narrowed ESR line the spin-density wave (SDW) $(T < T_{\rm SDW})$ and the normal metallic regime $(T > T_{\rm SDW})$ are clearly distinguished. At $T > T_{\rm SDW}$ the isotropic linear increase of the linewidth is driven by the Korringa relaxation which measures the conduction-electron density of states at the Fermi level. For $T < T_{\rm SDW}$ the anisotropy probes the local ligand field, while the coupling to the conduction electrons disappears. With increasing substitution $x$ or $y$ the transition temperature $T_{\rm SDW}$ decreases linearly accompanied by a linear decrease of the Korringa-relaxation rate from 8 Oe/K at $x=y=0$ down to 3 Oe/K at the onset of superconductivity at $x \approx 0.2$ or at $y \approx 0.3$, above which it remains nearly constant. Comparative ESR measurements on single crystals of the Eu diluted SDW compound Eu$_{0.2}$Sr$_{0.8}$Fe$_2$As$_2$ and superconducting (SC) Eu$_{0.22}$Sr$_{0.78}$Fe$_{1.72}$Co$_{0.28}$As$_2$ corroborate the leading influence of the ligand field on the Eu$^{2+}$ spin relaxation in the SDW regime as well as the Korringa relaxation in the normal metallic regime. Like in Eu$_{0.5}$K$_{0.5}$Fe$_2$As$_2$ a coherence peak is not detected in the latter compound at $T_{\rm c}=21$ K, which is in agreement with the expected complex anisotropic SC gap structure.