• In spinels ACr2O4 (A=Mg, Zn) realisation of the classical pyrochlore Heisenberg antiferromagnet model is complicated by a strong spin-lattice coupling: the extensive degeneracy of the ground state is lifted by a magneto-structural transition at TN=12.5 K. We study the resulting low-temperature low-symmetry crystal structure by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The consistent features of x-ray low-temperature patterns are explained by the tetragonal model of Ehrenberg et. al (Pow. Diff. 17, 230( 2002)), while other features depend on sample or cooling protocol. Complex partially ordered magnetic state is studied by neutron diffraction and spherical neutron polarimetry. Multiple magnetic domains of configuration arms of the propagation vectors k1=(1/2 1/2 0), k2=(1 0 1/2) appear. The ordered moment reaches 1.94(3) muB/Cr3+ for k1 and 2.08(3) muB/Cr3+ for k2, if equal amount of the k1 and k2 phases is assumed. The magnetic arrangements have the dominant components along the [110] and [1-10] diagonals and a smaller c-component. By inelastic neutron scattering we investigate the spin excitations, which comprise a mixture of dispersive spin waves propagating from the magnetic Bragg peaks and resonance modes centered at equal energy steps of 4.5 meV. We interpret these as acoustic and optical spin wave branches, but show that the neutron scattering cross sections of transitions within a unit of two corner-sharing tetrahedra match the observed intensity distribution of the resonances. The distinctive fingerprint of cluster-like excitations in the optical spin wave branches suggests that propagating excitations are localized by the complex crystal structure and magnetic orders.
  • Since the seminal ideas of Berezinskii, Kosterlitz and Thouless, topological excitations are at the heart of our understanding of a whole novel class of phase transitions. In most of the cases, those transitions are controlled by a single type of topological objects. There are however some situations, still poorly understood, where two dual topological excitations fight to control the phase diagram and the transition. Finding experimental realization of such cases is thus of considerable interest. We show here that this situation occurs in BaCo$_2$V$_2$O$_8$, a spin-1/2 Ising-like quasi-one dimensional antiferromagnet when subjected to a uniform magnetic field transverse to the Ising axis. Using neutron scattering experiments, we measure a drastic modification of the quantum excitations beyond a critical value of the magnetic field. This quantum phase transition is identified, through a comparison with theoretical calculations, to be a transition between two different types of solitonic topological objects, which are captured by different components of the dynamical structure factor.
  • The magnetic field induced rearrangement of the cycloidal spin structure in ferroelectric mono-domain single crystals of the room-temperature multiferroic BiFeO$_3$ is studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The cycloid propagation vectors are observed to rotate when magnetic fields applied perpendicular to the rhombohedral (polar) axis exceed a pinning threshold value of $\sim$5\,T. In light of these experimental results, a phenomenological model is proposed that captures the rearrangement of the cycloidal domains, and we revisit the microscopic origin of the magnetoelectric effect. A new coupling between the magnetic anisotropy and the polarization is proposed that explains the recently discovered magnetoelectric polarization to the rhombohedral axis.
  • We report that in a $\beta$-Mn-type chiral magnet Co$_9$Zn$_9$Mn$_2$, skyrmions are realized as a metastable state over a wide temperature range, including room temperature, via field-cooling through the thermodynamic equilibrium skyrmion phase that exists below a transition temperature $T_\mathrm{c}$ $\sim$ 400 K. The once-created metastable skyrmions survive at zero magnetic field both at and above room temperature. Such robust skyrmions in a wide temperature and magnetic field region demonstrate the key role of topology, and provide a significant step toward technological applications of skyrmions in bulk chiral magnets.
  • Metal organic magnets have enormous potential to host a variety of electronic and magnetic phases that originate from a strong interplay between the spin, orbital and lattice degrees of freedom. We control this interplay in the quantum magnet CuF$_2$(D$_2$O)$_2$pyz by using high pressure to drive the system through a structural and magnetic phase transition. Using neutron scattering, we show that the low pressure state, which hosts a two-dimensional square lattice with spin-wave excitations and a dominant exchange coupling of 0.89 meV, transforms at high pressure into a one-dimensional spin-chain hallmarked by a spinon continuum and a reduced exchange interaction of 0.43 meV. This direct microscopic observation of a magnetic dimensional crossover as a function of pressure opens up new possibilities for studying the evolution of fractionalised excitations in low dimensional quantum magnets and eventually pressure-controlled metal--insulator transitions.
  • Magnetic skyrmions are topologically protected spin-whirl quasiparticles currently considered as promising components for ultra-dense memory devices. In the bulk they form lattices that are stable over just a few Kelvin below the ordering temperature. This narrow stability range presents a key challenge for applications, and finding ways to tune the SkL stability over a wider phase space is a pressing issue. Here we show experimentally that the skyrmion phase in the magnetoelectric insulator ${\text{Cu}_2 \text{O} \text{Se} \text{O}_3}$ can either expand or shrink substantially depending on the polarity of a moderate applied electric field. The data are well-described by an expanded mean-field model with fluctuations that show how the electric field provides a direct control of the free energy difference between the skyrmion and the surrounding conical phase. Our finding of the direct electric field control of the skyrmion phase stability offers enormous potential for skyrmionic applications based on a magnetoelectric coupling.
  • The recent discovery of magnetic skyrmion lattices initiated a surge of interest in the scientific community. Several novel phenomena have been shown to emerge from the interaction of conducting electrons with the skyrmion lattice, such as a topological Hall-effect and a spin-transfer torque at ultra-low current densities. In the insulating compound Cu2OSeO3, magneto-electric coupling enables control of the skyrmion lattice via electric fields, promising a dissipation-less route towards novel spintronic devices. One of the outstanding fundamental issues is related to the thermodynamic stability of the skyrmion lattice. To date, the skyrmion lattice in bulk materials has been found only in a narrow temperature region just below the order-disorder transition. If this narrow stability is unavoidable, it would severely limit applications. Here we present the discovery that applying just moderate pressure on Cu2OSeO3 substantially increases the absolute size of the skyrmion pocket. This insight demonstrates directly that tuning the electronic structure can lead to a significant enhancement of the skyrmion lattice stability. We interpret the discovery by extending the previously employed Ginzburg-Landau approach and conclude that change in the anisotropy is the main driver for control of the size of the skyrmion pocket. This realization provides an important guide for tuning the properties of future skyrmion hosting materials.
  • Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers in logic or storage devices thanks to their robustness, guaranteed by the topological protection, and their nanometric size. Currently, little is known about the influence of parameters such as disorder, defects or external stimuli, on the long-range spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the skyrmion lattice. Here, using a large (7.3x7.3{\mu}m$^{2}$) single crystal nano-slice of Cu$_{2}$OSeO$_{3}$, we image up to 70,000 skyrmions, by means of cryo-Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy as a function of the applied magnetic field. The emergence of the skyrmion lattice from the helimagnetic phase is monitored, revealing the existence of a glassy skyrmion phase at the phase transition field, where patches of an octagonally distorted skyrmion lattice are also discovered. In the skyrmion phase, dislocations are shown to cause the emergence and switching between domains with different lattice orientations and the temporal fluctuations of these domains is filmed. These results demonstrate the importance of direct-space and real-time imaging of skyrmion domains for addressing both their long-range topology and stability.
  • Skyrmions, topologically protected vortex-like nanometric spin textures in magnets, have been attracting increasing attention for emergent electromagnetic responses and possible technological applications for spintronics. In particular, metallic magnets with chiral and cubic/tetragonal crystal structure may have high potential to host skyrmions that can be driven by low electrical current excitation. However, experimental observations of skyrmions have so far been limited to below room temperature for the metallic chiral magnets, specifically for the MnSi-type B20 compounds. Toward technological applications, it is crucial to transcend this limitation. Here we demonstrate the formation of skyrmions with unique spin helicity both at and above room temperature in a family of cubic chiral magnets: beta-Mn-type Co-Zn-Mn alloys with a different chiral space group from that of B20 compounds. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (LTEM), magnetization, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements unambiguously reveal the formation of a skyrmion crystal under the application of magnetic field (H<~1 kOe) in both thin- plate (thickness<150 nm) and bulk forms.
  • Following the early prediction of the skyrmion lattice (SkL) - a periodic array of spin vortices - it has been observed recently in various magnetic crystals mostly with chiral structure. Although non-chiral but polar crystals with C$_{nv}$ symmetry were identifed as ideal SkL hosts in pioneering theoretical studies this archetype of SkL has remained experimentally unexplored. Here, we report the discovery of a SkL in the polar magnetic semiconductor GaV$_4$S$_8$ with rhombohedral (C$_{3v}$) symmetry and easy axis anisotropy. The SkL exists over an unusually broad temperature range compared with other bulk crystals and the orientation of the vortices is not controlled by the external magnetic feld but instead confned to the magnetic easy axis. Supporting theory attributes these unique features to a new non-chiral or N\'eel-type of SkL describable as a superposition of spin cycloids in contrast to the Bloch-type SkL in chiral magnets described in terms of spin helices.
  • The suppression of magnetic order with pressure concomitant with the appearance of pressure- induced superconductivity was recently discovered in CrAs. Here we present a neutron diffraction study of the pressure evolution of the helimagnetic ground-state towards and in the vicinity of the superconducting phase. Neutron diffraction on polycrystalline CrAs was employed from zero pressure to 0.65 GPa and at various temperatures. The helimagnetic long-range order is sustained under pressure and the magnetic propagation vector does not show any considerable change. The average ordered magnetic moment is reduced from 1.73(2) {\mu}B at ambient pressure to 0.4(1) {\mu}B close to the critical pressure Pc=0.7 GPa, at which magnetic order is completely suppressed. The width of the magnetic Bragg peaks strongly depends on temperature and pressure, showing a maximum in the region of the onset of superconductivity. We interpret this as associated with competing ground-states in the vicinity of the superconducting phase.
  • We present a detailed AC susceptibility investigation of the fluctuation regime in the insulating cubic helimagnet Cu2OSeO3. For magnetic fields mu_0 H >= 200 mT, and over a wide temperature range, the system behaves according to the scaling relations characteristic of the classical 3D Heisenberg model. For lower magnetic fields the scaling is preserved only at higher T, and becomes renormalized in a narrow T range above the transition temperature. Contrary to the well-studied case of MnSi, where the renormalization has been interpreted within the Brazovskii theory, our analysis of the renormalization at H = 0 shows the fluctuation regime in Cu2OSeO3 to lie closer to that expected within the Wilson-Fischer scenario.
  • Single phase and strained LuMnO3 thin films are discovered to display co-existing ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic orders. A large moment ferromagnetism (approx. 1 muB), which is absent in bulk samples, is shown to display a magnetic moment distribution that is peaked at the highly-strained substrate-film interface. We further show that the strain-induced ferromagnetism and the antiferromagnetic order are coupled via an exchange field, therefore demonstrating strained rare-earth managanite thin films as promising candidate systems for new multifunctional devices.
  • Small-angle neutron scattering has been employed to study the influence of applied electric (E-) fields on the skyrmion lattice in the chiral lattice magnetoelectric Cu2OSeO3. In an experimental geometry with the E-field parallel to the [111] axis, and the magnetic field parallel to the [1-10] axis, we demonstrate that the effect of applying an E-field is to controllably rotate the skyrmion lattice around the magnetic field axis. Our results are an important first demonstration for a microscopic coupling between applied E-fields and the skyrmions in an insulator, and show that the general emergent properties of skyrmions may be tailored according to the properties of the host system.
  • We report neutron inelastic scattering measurements on the normal and superconducting states of single-crystalline Cs0.8Fe1.9Se2. Consistent with previous measurements on Rb(x)Fe(2-y)Se2, we observe two distinct spin excitation signals: (i) spin-wave excitations characteristic of the block antiferromagnetic order found in insulating A(x)Fe(2-y)Se2 compounds, and (ii) a resonance-like magnetic peak localized in energy at 11 meV and at an in-plane wave vector of (0.25, 0.5). The resonance peak increases below Tc = 27 K, and has a similar absolute intensity to the resonance peaks observed in other Fe-based superconductors. The existence of a magnetic resonance in the spectrum of Rb(x)Fe(2-y)Se2 and now of Cs(x)Fe(2-y)Se2 suggests that this is a common feature of superconductivity in this family. The low energy spin-wave excitations in Cs0.8Fe1.9Se2 show no measurable response to superconductivity, consistent with the notion of spatially separate magnetic and superconducting phases.
  • The olivine compound Mn2GeO4 is shown to feature both a ferroelectric polarization and a ferromagnetic magnetization that are directly coupled and point along the same direction. We show that a spin spiral generates ferroelectricity (FE), and a canted commensurate order leads to weak ferromagnetism (FM). Symmetry suggests that the direct coupling between the FM and FE is mediated by Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions that exist only in the ferroelectric phase, controlling both the sense of the spiral rotation and the canting of the commensurate structure. Our study demonstrates how multi-component magnetic structures found in magnetically-frustrated materials like Mn2GeO4 provide a new route towards functional materials that exhibit coupled FM and FE.
  • We use small angle neutron scattering to study the superconducting vortex lattice in La$_{2-x}$Sr$_x$CuO$_4$ as a function of doping and magnetic field. We show that near optimally doping the vortex lattice coordination and the superconducting coherence length $\xi$ are controlled by a van-Hove singularity crossing the Fermi level near the Brillouin zone boundary. The vortex lattice properties change dramatically as a spin-density-wave instability is approached upon underdoping. The Bragg glass paradigm provides a good description of this regime and suggests that SDW order acts as a novel source of disorder on the vortex lattice.
  • We present small angle neutron scattering studies of the vortex lattice (VL) in CeCoIn5 with magnetic fields applied parallel (H) to the antinodal [100] and nodal [110] directions. For H || [100], a single VL orientation is observed, while a 90 degree reorientation transition is found for H || [110]. For both field orientations and VL configurations we find a distorted hexagonal VL with an anisotropy, Gamma = 2.0 +/- 0.05. The VL form factor shows strong Pauli paramagnetic effects similar to what have previously been reported for H || [001]. At high fields, above which the upper critical field (Hc2) becomes a first-order transition, an increased disordering of the VL is observed.
  • Understanding the mechanism and symmetry of electron pairing in iron-based superconductors represents an important challenge in condensed matter physics [1-3]. The observation of magnetic flux lines - "vortices" - in a superconductor can contribute to this issue, because the spatial variation of magnetic field reflects the pairing. Unlike many other iron pnictides, our KFe2As2 crystals have very weak vortex pinning, allowing small-angle-neutron-scattering (SANS) observations of the intrinsic vortex lattice (VL). We observe nearly isotropic hexagonal packing of vortices, without VL-symmetry transitions up to high fields along the fourfold c-axis of the crystals, indicating rather small anisotropy of the superconducting properties around this axis. This rules out gap nodes parallel to the c-axis, and thus d-wave and also anisotropic s-wave pairing [2, 3]. The strong temperature-dependence of the intensity down to T<<Tc indicates either widely different full gaps on different Fermi surface sheets, or nodal lines perpendicular to the axis.
  • CeCoIn5 is a heavy fermion Type-II superconductor which exhibits clear indications of Pauli-limited superconductivity. A variety of measurements give evidence for a transition at high magnetic fields inside the superconducting state, when the field is applied either parallel to or perpendicular to the c axis. When the field is perpendicular to the c axis, antiferromagnetic order is observed on the high-field side of the transition, with a magnetic wavevector of (q q 0.5), where q = 0.44 reciprocal lattice units. We show that this order remains as the magnetic field is rotated out of the basal plane, but the associated moment eventually disappears above 17 degrees, indicating that the anomalies seen with the field parallel to the c axis are not related to this magnetic order. We discuss the implications of this finding.
  • We report superconducting (SC) properties of stoichiometric LiFeAs (Tc = 17 K) studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES). Although the vortex lattice exhibits no long-range order, well-defined SANS rocking curves indicate better ordering than in chemically doped 122-compounds. The London penetration depth of 210 nm, determined from the magnetic field dependence of the form factor, is compared to that calculated from the ARPES band structure with no adjustable parameters. Its temperature dependence is best described by a single isotropic SC gap of 3.0 meV, which agrees with the ARPES value of 3.1 meV and corresponds to the ratio 2Delta/kTc = 4.1, approaching the weak-coupling limit predicted by the BCS theory. This classifies LiFeAs as a weakly coupled single-gap superconductor, similar to conventional metals.
  • The disordered flux line lattice in single crystals of the slightly overdoped aFe_{2-x}Co_xAs_2 (x = 0.19, Tc = 23 K) superconductor is studied by magnetization measurements, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). In the whole range of magnetic fields up to 9 T, vortex pinning precludes the formation of an ordered Abrikosov lattice. Instead, a vitreous vortex phase (vortex glass) with a short-range hexagonal order is observed. Statistical processing of MFM datasets lets us directly measure its radial and angular distribution functions and extract the radial correlation length \zeta. In contrast to predictions of the collective pinning model, no increase in the correlated volume with the applied field is observed. Instead, we find that \zeta decreases as 1.3*R1 ~ H^(-1/2) over four decades of the applied magnetic field, where R1 is the radius of the first coordination shell of the vortex lattice. Such universal scaling of \zeta implies that the vortex pinning in iron arsenides remains strong even in the absence of static magnetism. This result is consistent with all the real- and reciprocal-space vortex-lattice measurements in overdoped as-grown aFe_{2-x}Co_xAs_2 published to date and is thus sample-independent. The failure of the collective pinning model suggests that the vortices remain in the single-vortex pinning limit even in high magnetic fields up to 9 T.