• Debris disks are usually detected through the infrared excess over the photospheric level of their host star. The most favorable stars for disk detection are those with spectral types between A and K, while the statistics for debris disks detected around low-mass M-type stars is very low, either because they are rare or because they are more difficult to detect. Terrestrial planets, on the other hand, may be common around M-type stars. Here, we report on the discovery of an extended (likely) debris disk around the M-dwarf GSC 07396-00759. The star is a wide companion of the close accreting binary V4046 Sgr. The system probably is a member of the $\beta$ Pictoris Moving Group. We resolve the disk in scattered light, exploiting high-contrast, high-resolution imagery with the two near-infrared subsystems of the VLT/SPHERE instrument, operating in the YJ bands and the H2H3 doublet. The disk is clearly detected up to 1.5" ($\sim110$ au) from the star and appears as a ring, with an inclination $i\sim83$ degree, and a peak density position at $\sim 70$ au. The spatial extension of the disk suggests that the dust dynamics is affected by a strong stellar wind, showing similarities with the AU Mic system that has also been resolved with SPHERE. The images show faint asymmetric structures at the widest separation in the northwest side. We also set an upper limit for the presence of giant planets to $2 M_J$. Finally, we note that the 2 resolved disks around M-type stars of 30 such stars observed with SPHERE are viewed close to edge-on, suggesting that a significant population of debris disks around M dwarfs could remain undetected because of an unfavorable orientation.
  • The satellites of Jupiter are thought to form in a circumplanetary disc. Here we address their formation and orbital evolution with a population synthesis approach, by varying the dust-to-gas ratio, the disc dispersal timescale and the dust refilling timescale. The circumplanetary disc initial conditions (density and temperature) are directly drawn from the results of 3D radiative hydrodynamical simulations. The disc evolution is taken into account within the population synthesis. The satellitesimals were assumed to grow via streaming instability. We find that the moons form fast, often within $10^4$ years, due to the short orbital timescales in the circumplanetary disc. They form in sequence, and many are lost into the planet due to fast type I migration, polluting Jupiter's envelope with typically $0.3$ Earth-masses of metals, and up to $10$ Earth-masses in some cases. The last generation of moons can form very late in the evolution of the giant planet, when the disc has already lost more than the $99\%$ of its mass. The late circumplanetary disc is cold enough to sustain water ice, hence not surprisingly the $85\%$ of the moon population has icy composition. The distribution of the satellite-masses is peaking slightly above Galilean masses, up until a few Earth-masses, in a regime which is observable with the current instrumentation around Jupiter-analog exoplanets orbiting $1$ AU away from their host stars. We also find that systems with Galilean-like masses occur in $20\%$ of the cases and they are more likely when discs have long dispersion timescales and high dust-to-gas ratios.
  • HD$\,$169142 is an excellent target to investigate signs of planet-disk interaction due to the previous evidence of gap structures. We performed J-band (~1.2{\mu}m) polarized intensity imaging of HD169142 with VLT/SPHERE. We observe polarized scattered light down to 0.16" (~19 au) and find an inner gap with a significantly reduced scattered light flux. We confirm the previously detected double ring structure peaking at 0.18" (~21 au) and 0.56" (~66 au), and marginally detect a faint third gap at 0.70"-0.73" (~82-85 au). We explore dust evolution models in a disk perturbed by two giant planets, as well as models with a parameterized dust size distribution. The dust evolution model is able to reproduce the ring locations and gap widths in polarized intensity, but fails to reproduce their depths. It, however, gives a good match with the ALMA dust continuum image at 1.3 mm. Models with a parameterized dust size distribution better reproduce the gap depth in scattered light, suggesting that dust filtration at the outer edges of the gaps is less effective. The pile-up of millimeter grains in a dust trap and the continuous distribution of small grains throughout the gap likely require a more efficient dust fragmentation and dust diffusion in the dust trap. Alternatively, turbulence or charging effects might lead to a reservoir of small grains at the surface layer that is not affected by the dust growth and fragmentation cycle dominating the dense disk midplane. The exploration of models shows that extracting planet properties such as mass from observed gap profiles is highly degenerate.
  • We present mock observations of forming planets with ALMA. The possible detections of circumplanetary disks (CPDs) were investigated around planets of Saturn, 1, 3, 5, and 10 Jupiter-masses that are placed at 5.2 AU from their star. The radiative, three dimensional hydrodynamic simulations were then post-processed with RADMC3D and the ALMA Observation Simulator. We found that even though the CPDs are too small to be resolved, they are hot due to the accreting planet in the optically thick limit, therefore the best chance to detect them with continuum observations in this case is at the shortest ALMA wavelengths, such as Band 9 (440 microns). Similar fluxes were found in the case of Saturn and Jupiter-mass planets, as for the 10 $\mathrm{M_{Jup}}$ gas-giant, due to temperature weighted optical depth effects: when no deep gap is carved, the planet region is blanketed by the optically thick circumstellar disk leading to a less efficient cooling there. A test was made for a 52 AU orbital separation, showed that optically thin CPDs are also detectable in band 7 but they need longer integration times ($>$5hrs). Comparing the gap profiles of the same simulation at various ALMA bands and the hydro simulation confirmed that they change significantly, first because the gap is wider at longer wavelengths due to decreasing optical depth; second, the beam convolution makes the gap shallower and at least 25% narrower. Therefore, caution has to be made when estimating planet masses based on ALMA continuum observations of gaps.
  • We present observations of the known edge-on debris disk around HIP 79977 (HD 146897, F star in Upper Sco, 123 pc), taken with the ZIMPOL differential polarimeter of the SPHERE instrument in the Very Broad Band filter ($\lambda_c=735$ nm, $\Delta\lambda=290$ nm) with a spatial resolution of about 25 mas. We measure the polarization flux along and perpendicular to the disk spine of the highly inclined disk for projected separations between 0.2" (25 AU) and 1.6" (200 AU) and investigate the diagnostic potential of such data with model simulations. The polarized flux contrast ratio for the disk is $F_{pol}/F_\ast= (5.5 \pm 0.9) 10^{-4}$. The surface brightness reaches a maximum of 16.2 mag arcsec$^{-2}$ at a separation of $0.2"-0.5"$ along the disk spine with a maximum surface brightness contrast of 7.64 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. The polarized flux has a minimum near the star $<0.2"$ because no or only little polarization is produced by forward or backward scattering in the disk section lying in front of or behind the star. The data are modeled as a circular dust belt with an inclination $i=85(\pm 1.5)^\circ$ and a radius between $r_0$ = 60 AU and 90 AU. The radial density dependence is described by $(r/r_0)^{\alpha}$ with a steep power law index $\alpha=5$ inside $r_0$ and a more shallow index $\alpha=-2.5$ outside $r_0$. The scattering asymmetry factor lies between $g$ = 0.2 and 0.6 adopting a scattering angle-dependence for the fractional polarization as for Rayleigh scattering. Our data are qualitatively very similar to the case of AU Mic and they confirm that edge-on debris disks have a polarization minimum at a position near the star and a maximum near the projected separation of the main debris belt. The comparison of the polarized flux contrast ratio $F_{pol}/F_{\ast}$ with the fractional infrared excess provides strong constraints on the scattering albedo of the dust.
  • July 5, 2017 astro-ph.EP
    The SHINE program is a large high-contrast near-infrared survey of 600 young, nearby stars. It is aimed at searching for and characterizing new planetary systems using VLT/SPHERE's unprecedented high-contrast and high-angular resolution imaging capabilities. It also intends at placing statistical constraints on the occurrence and orbital properties of the giant planet population at large orbits as a function of the stellar host mass and age to test planet formation theories. We use the IRDIS dual-band imager and the IFS integral field spectrograph of SPHERE to acquire high-constrast coronagraphic differential near-infrared images and spectra of the young A2 star HIP65426. It is a member of the ~17 Myr old Lower Centaurus-Crux association. At a separation of 830 mas (92 au projected) from the star, we detect a faint red companion. Multi-epoch observations confirm that it shares common proper motion with HIP65426. Spectro-photometric measurements extracted with IFS and IRDIS between 0.95 and 2.2um indicate a warm, dusty atmosphere characteristic of young low surface-gravity L5-L7 dwarfs. Hot-start evolutionary models predict a luminosity consistent with a 6-12 MJup, Teff=1300-1600 K and R=1.5 RJup giant planet. Finally, the comparison with Exo-REM and PHOENIX BT-Settl synthetic atmosphere models gives consistent effective temperatures but with slightly higher surface gravity solutions of log(g)=4.0-5.0 with smaller radii (1.0-1.3 RJup). Given its physical and spectral properties, HIP65426b occupies a rather unique placement in terms of age, mass and spectral-type among the currently known imaged planets. It represents a particularly interesting case to study the presence of clouds as a function of particle size, composition, and location in the atmosphere, to search for signatures of non-equilibrium chemistry, and finally to test the theory of planet formation and evolution.
  • We have observed the protoplanetary disk of the well-known young Herbig star HD 142527 using ZIMPOL Polarimetric Differential Imaging with the VBB (Very Broad Band, ~600-900nm) filter. We obtained two datasets in May 2015 and March 2016. Our data allow us to explore dust scattering around the star down to a radius of ~0.025" (~4au). The well-known outer disk is clearly detected, at higher resolution than before, and shows previously unknown sub-structures, including spirals going inwards into the cavity. Close to the star, dust scattering is detected at high signal-to-noise ratio, but it is unclear whether the signal represents the inner disk, which has been linked to the two prominent local minima in the scattering of the outer disk, interpreted as shadows. An interpretation of an inclined inner disk combined with a dust halo is compatible with both our and previous observations, but other arrangements of the dust cannot be ruled out. Dust scattering is also present within the large gap between ~30 and ~140au. The comparison of the two datasets suggests rapid evolution of the inner regions of the disk, potentially driven by the interaction with the close-in M-dwarf companion, around which no polarimetric signal is detected.
  • Circumplanetary disks regulate the late accretion to the giant planet and serve as the birthplace for satellites. Understanding their characteristics via simulations also helps to prepare for their observations. Here we study disks around 1, 3, 5, 10 $\mathrm{M_{Jup}}$ planets with three dimensional, global radiative hydrodynamic simulations with sub-planet peak resolution, and various planetary temperatures. We found that as the 1 $\mathrm{M_{Jup}}$ planet radiates away its formation heat, the circumplanetary envelope transitions to a disk between $T_p = 6000$ K and 4000 K. In the case of 3-10 $\mathrm{M_{Jup}}$ planets a disk always forms. The temperature profile of the circumplanetary disks is very steep, the inner 1/6th is over the silicate condensation temperature and the entire disk is above water freezing point, making satellite formation impossible in this early stage ($<$1 Myr). Satellites might form much later and first in the outer parts of the disk migrating inwards later on. Our disk masses are $1, 7, 20, 40 \times 10^{-3}\mathrm{M_{Jup}}$ for the 1, 3, 5, 10 $\mathrm{M_{Jup}}$ gas giants respectively, and we provide an empirical formula to estimate the subdisk masses based on the planet- and circumstellar disk mass. Our finding is that the cooler the planet, the lower the temperature of the subdisk, the higher the vertical influx velocities, and the planetary gap is both deeper and wider. We also show that the gaps in 2D and 3D are different. The subdisk eccentricity increases with planetary mass and violently interacts with the circumstellar disk, making satellite-formation less likely, if $\mathrm{M_p} \gtrsim 5 \mathrm{M_{Jup}}$.
  • The transition disk around the T Tauri star T Cha possesses a large gap, making it a prime target for high-resolution imaging in the context of planet formation. We aim to find signs of disk evolutionary processes by studying the disk geometry and the dust grain properties at its surface, and to search for companion candidates. We analyze a set of VLT/SPHERE data at near-infrared and optical wavelengths. We performed polarimetric imaging of T Cha with IRDIS (1.6 $\mu$m) and ZIMPOL (0.5-0.9 $\mu$m), and obtained intensity images from IRDIS dual-band imaging with simultaneous spectro-imaging with IFS (0.9-1.3 $\mu$m). The disk around T Cha is detected in all observing modes and its outer disk is resolved in scattered light with unprecedented angular resolution and signal-to-noise. The images reveal a highly inclined disk with a noticeable east-west brightness asymmetry. The significant amount of non-azimuthal polarization signal in the $U_{\phi}$ images, with a $U_{\phi}$/$Q_{\phi}$ peak-to-peak value of 14%, is in accordance with theoretical studies on multiple scattering. Our optimal axisymmetric radiative transfer model considers two coplanar inner and outer disks, separated by a gap of 0.28" (~30au) in size. We derive a disk inclination of ~69 deg and PA of ~114 deg. In order to self-consistently reproduce the intensity and polarimetric images, the dust grains, responsible for the scattered light, need to be dominated by sizes of around ten microns. A point source is detected at an angular distance of 3.5" from the central star. It is, however, found not to be co-moving. We confirm that the dominant source of emission is forward scattered light from the near edge of the outer disk. Our point source analysis rules out the presence of a companion heavier than ~8.5 $M_{\mathrm{jup}}$ between 0.1" and 0.3". The detection limit decreases to ~2 $M_{\mathrm{jup}}$ for 0.3" to 4.0".
  • R Aqr is a symbiotic binary system consisting of a mira variable, a hot companion with a spectacular jet outflow, and an extended emission line nebula. We have used R Aqr as test target for the visual camera subsystem ZIMPOL, which is part of the new extreme adaptive optics (AO) instrument SPHERE at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). We compare our observations with data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and illustrate the complementarity of the two instruments. We determine from the Halpha emission the position, size, geometric structure, and line fluxes of the jet source and the clouds in the innermost region (<2") of R Aqr and determine Halpha emissivities mean density, mass, recombination time scale, and other cloud parameters. Our data resolve for the first time the R Aqr binary and we measure for the jet source a relative position 46+/-1 mas West of the mira. The central jet source is the strongest Halpha component. North east and south west from the central source there are many clouds with very diverse structures. We see in the SW a string of bright clouds arranged in a zig-zag pattern and, further out, more extended bubbles. In the N and NE we see a bright, very elongated filamentary structure and faint perpendicular "wisps" further out. Some jet clouds are also detected in the ZIMPOL [OI] and He I filters, as well as in the HST line filters for Halpha, [OIII], [NII], and [OI]. We determine jet cloud parameters and find a very well defined anti-correlation between cloud density and distance to the central binary. Future Halpha observations will provide the orientation of the orbital plane of the binary and allow detailed hydrodynamical investigations of this jet outflow and its interaction with the wind of the red giant companion.
  • ASTEP (Antarctica Search for Transiting ExoPlanets) is a pilot project that aims at searching and characterizing transiting exoplanets from Dome C in Antarctica and to qualify this site for photometry in the visible. Two instruments were installed at Dome C and ran for six winters in total. The analysis of the collected data is nearly complete. We present the operation of the instruments, and the technical challenges, limitations, and possible solutions in light of the data quality. The instruments performed continuous observations during the winters. Human interventions are required mainly for regular inspection and ice dust removal. A defrosting system is efficient at preventing and removing ice on the mirrors. The PSF FWHM is 4.5 arcsec on average which is 2.5 times larger than the specification, and is highly variable; the causes are the poor ground-level seeing, the turbulent plumes generated by the heating system, and to a lower extent the imperfect optical alignment and focusing, and some astigmatism. We propose solutions for each of these aspects that would largely increase the PSF stability. The astrometric and guiding precisions are satisfactory and would deserve only minor improvements. Major issues are encountered with the camera shutter which did not close properly after two winters; we minimized this issue by heating the shutter and by developing specific image calibration algorithms. Finally, we summarize the site testing and science results obtained with ASTEP. Overall, the ASTEP experiment will serve as a basis to design and operate future optical and near-infrared telescopes in Antarctica.
  • The luminosity of young giant planets can inform about their formation and accretion history. The directly imaged planets detected so far are consistent with the "hot-start" scenario of high entropy and luminosity. If nebular gas passes through a shock front before being accreted into a protoplanet, the entropy can be substantially altered. To investigate this, we present high resolution, 3D radiative hydrodynamic simulations of accreting giant planets. The accreted gas is found to fall with supersonic speed in the gap from the circumstellar disk's upper layers onto the surface of the circumplanetary disk and polar region of the protoplanet. There it shocks, creating an extended hot supercritical shock surface. This shock front is optically thick, therefore, it can conceal the planet's intrinsic luminosity beneath. The gas in the vertical influx has high entropy which when passing through the shock front decreases significantly while the gas becomes part of the disk and protoplanet. This shows that circumplanetary disks play a key role in regulating a planet's thermodynamic state. Our simulations furthermore indicate that around the shock surface extended regions of atomic - sometimes ionized - hydrogen develop. Therefore circumplanetary disk shock surfaces could influence significantly the observational appearance of forming gas-giants.
  • Circumplanetary disks can be found around forming giant planets, regardless of whether core accretion or gravitational instability built the planet. We carried out state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations of the circumplanetary disks for both formation scenarios, using as similar initial conditions as possible to unveil possible intrinsic differences in the circumplanetary disk mass and temperature between the two formation mechanisms. We found that the circumplanetary disks mass linearly scales with the circumstellar disk mass. Therefore, in an equally massive protoplanetary disk, the circumplanetary disks formed in the disk instability model can be only a factor of eight more massive than their core-accretion counterparts. On the other hand, the bulk circumplanetary disk temperature differs by more than an order of magnitude between the two cases. The subdisks around planets formed by gravitational instability have a characteristic temperature below 100 K, while the core accretion circumplanetary disks are hot, with temperatures even greater than 1000 K when embedded in massive, optically thick protoplanetary disks. We explain how this difference can be understood as the natural result of the different formation mechanisms. We argue that the different temperatures should persist up to the point when a full-fledged gas giant forms via disk instability, hence our result provides a convenient criteria for observations to distinguish between the two main formation scenarios by measuring the bulk temperature in the planet vicinity.
  • We present three-dimensional simulations with nested meshes of the dynamics of the gas around a Jupiter mass planet with the JUPITER and FARGOCA codes. We implemented a radiative transfer module into the JUPITER code to account for realistic heating and cooling of the gas. We focus on the circumplanetary gas flow, determining its characteristics at very high resolution ($80\%$ of Jupiter's diameter). In our nominal simulation where the temperature evolves freely by the radiative module and reaches 13000 K at the planet, a circumplanetary envelope was formed filling the entire Roche-lobe. Because of our equation of state is simplified and probably overestimates the temperature, we also performed simulations with limited maximal temperatures in the planet region (1000 K, 1500 K, and 2000 K). In these fixed temperature cases circumplanetary disks (CPDs) were formed. This suggests that the capability to form a circumplanetary disk is not simply linked to the mass of the planet and its ability to open a gap. Instead, the gas temperature at the planet's location, which depends on its accretion history, plays also fundamental role. The CPDs in the simulations are hot and cooling very slowly, they have very steep temperature and density profiles, and are strongly sub-Keplerian. Moreover, the CPDs are fed by a strong vertical influx, which shocks on the CPD surfaces creating a hot and luminous shock-front. In contrast, the pressure supported circumplanetary envelope is characterized by internal convection and almost stalled rotation.
  • For the very first time we present 3D simulations of planets embedded in stellar irradiated discs. It is well known that thermal effects could reverse the direction of planetary migration from inwards to outwards, potentially saving planets in the inner, optically thick parts of the protoplanetary disc. When considering stellar irradiation in addition to viscous friction as a source of heating, the outer disc changes from a shadowed to a flared structure. Using a suited analytical formula it has been shown that in the flared part of the disc the migration is inwards; planets can migrate outwards only in shadowed regions of the disc, { because the radial gradient of entropy is stronger there}. In order to confirm this result numerically, we have computed the total torque acting on planets held on fixed orbits embedded in stellar irradiated 3D discs using the hydrodynamical code FARGOCA. We find qualitatively good agreement between the total torque obtained with numerical simulations and the one predicted by the analytical formula. For large masses (>20 Earth masses) we find quantitative agreement, and we obtain outwards migration regions for planets up to 60 Earth masses in the early stages of accretional discs. We find nevertheless that the agreement with the analytic formula is quite fortuitous because the formula underestimates the size of the horseshoe region; this error is compensated by imperfect estimates of other terms, most likely the cooling rate and saturation.
  • We examine the gas circulation near a gap opened by a giant planet in a protoplanetary disk. We show with high resolution 3D simulations that the gas flows into the gap at high altitude over the mid-plane, at a rate dependent on viscosity. We explain this observation with a simple conceptual model. From this model we derive an estimate of the amount of gas flowing into a gap opened by a planet with Hill radius comparable to the scale-height of a layered disk (i. e. a disk with viscous upper layer and inviscid midplane). Our estimate agrees with modern MRI simulations(Gressel et al., 2013). We conclude that gap opening in a layered disk can not slow down significantly the runaway gas accretion of Saturn to Jupiter-mass planets.
  • In the core-accretion model the nominal runaway gas-accretion phase brings most planets to multiple Jupiter masses. However, known giant planets are predominantly Jupiter-mass bodies. Obtaining longer timescales for gas accretion may require using realistic equations of states, or accounting for the dynamics of the circumplanetary disk (CPD) in low-viscosity regime, or both. Here we explore the second way using global, three-dimensional isothermal hydrodynamical simulations with 8 levels of nested grids around the planet. In our simulations the vertical inflow from the circumstellar disk (CSD) to the CPD determines the shape of the CPD and its accretion rate. Even without prescribed viscosity Jupiter's mass-doubling time is $\sim 10^4$ years, assuming the planet at 5.2 AU and a Minimum Mass Solar Nebula. However, we show that this high accretion rate is due to resolution-dependent numerical viscosity. Furthermore, we consider the scenario of a layered CSD, viscous only in its surface layer, and an inviscid CPD. We identify two planet-accretion mechanisms that are independent of the viscosity in the CPD: (i) the polar inflow -- defined as a part of the vertical inflow with a centrifugal radius smaller than 2 Jupiter-radii and (ii) the torque exerted by the star on the CPD. In the limit of zero effective viscosity, these two mechanisms would produce an accretion rate 40 times smaller than in the simulation.
  • In the last decade many kinematic groups of young stars (<100 Myr) were discovered in the solar neighbourhood. Since the most interesting period of planet formation overlaps with the age of these groups, their well dated members are attractive targets for exoplanet searches by direct imaging. We combined astrometric, photometric and X-ray data, and applied strict selection criteria to explore the stellar content of five nearby moving groups. We identified more than 100 potential new candidate members in the {\ss} Pic moving group, and in the Tucana-Horologium, Columba, Carina, and Argus associations. In order to further assess and confirm their membership status, we analysed radial velocity data and lithium equivalent widths extracted from high-resolution spectra of 54 candidate stars. We identified 35 new probable/possible young moving group members: 4 in the {\ss} Pic moving group, 11 in the Columba association, 16 in the Carina association, and 4 in the Argus association. We found serendipitiously a new AB Dor moving group member as well. For four Columba systems Hipparcos based parallaxes have already been available and as they are consistent with the predicted kinematic parallaxes, they can be considered as secure new members.
  • Recently, a new planet candidate was discovered on direct images around the young (10-17 Myr) A-type star HD95086. The strong infrared excess of the system indicates that, similarly to HR8799, {\ss} Pic, and Fomalhaut, the star harbors a circumstellar disk. Aiming to study the structure and gas content of the HD95086 disk, and to investigate its possible interaction with the newly discovered planet, here we present new optical, infrared and millimeter observations. We detected no CO emission, excluding the possibility of an evolved gaseous primordial disk. Simple blackbody modeling of the spectral energy distribution suggests the presence of two spatially separate dust belts at radial distances of 6 and 64 AU. Our resolved images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory reveal a characteristic disk size of ~6.0x5.4 arcsec (540x490 AU) and disk inclination of ~25 degree. Assuming the same inclination for the planet candidate's orbit, its re-projected radial distance from the star is 62 AU, very close to the blackbody radius of the outer cold dust ring. The structure of the planetary system at HD95086 resembles the one around HR8799. Both systems harbor a warm inner dust belt and a broad colder outer disk and giant planet(s) between the two dusty regions. Modelling implies that the candidate planet can dynamically excite the motion of planetesimals even out to 270 AU via their secular perturbation if its orbital eccentricity is larger than about 0.4. Our analysis adds a new example to the three known systems where directly imaged planet(s) and debris disks co-exist.
  • The ASTEP (Antarctica Search for Transiting ExoPlanets) program was originally aimed at probing the quality of the Dome C, Antarctica for the discovery and characterization of exoplanets by photometry. In the first year of operation of the 40 cm ASTEP 400 telescope (austral winter 2010), we targeted the known transiting planet WASP-19b in order to try to detect its secondary transits in the visible. This is made possible by the excellent sub-millimagnitude precision of the binned data. The WASP-19 system was observed during 24 nights in May 2010. The photometric variability level due to starspots is about 1.8% (peak-to-peak), in line with the SuperWASP data from 2007 (1.4%) and larger than in 2008 (0.07%). We find a rotation period of WASP-19 of 10.7 +/- 0.5 days, in agreement with the SuperWASP determination of 10.5 +/- 0.2 days. Theoretical models show that this can only be explained if tidal dissipation in the star is weak, i.e. the tidal dissipation factor Q'star > 3.10^7. Separately, we find evidence for a secondary eclipse of depth 390 +/- 190 ppm with a 2.0 sigma significance, a phase consistent with a circular orbit and a 3% false positive probability. Given the wavelength range of the observations (420 to 950 nm), the secondary transit depth translates into a day side brightness temperature of 2690(-220/+150) K, in line with measurements in the z' and K bands. The day side emission observed in the visible could be due either to thermal emission of an extremely hot day side with very little redistribution of heat to the night side, or to direct reflection of stellar light with a maximum geometrical albedo Ag=0.27 +/- 0.13. We also report a low-frequency oscillation well in phase at the planet orbital period, but with a lower-limit amplitude that could not be attributed to the planet phase alone, and possibly contaminated with residual lightcurve trends.
  • The ASTEP project aims at detecting and characterizing transiting planets from Dome C, Antarctica, and qualifying this site for photometry in the visible. The first phase of the project, ASTEP South, is a fixed 10 cm diameter instrument pointing continuously towards the celestial South pole. Observations were made almost continuously during 4 winters, from 2008 to 2011. The point-to-point RMS of 1-day photometric lightcurves can be explained by a combination of expected statistical noises, dominated by the photon noise up to magnitude 14. This RMS is large, from 2.5 mmag at R=8 to 6% at R=14, because of the small size of ASTEP South and the short exposure time (30 s). Statistical noises should be considerably reduced using the large amount of collected data. A 9.9-day period eclipsing binary is detected, with a magnitude R=9.85. The 2-season lightcurve folded in phase and binned into 1000 points has a RMS of 1.09 mmag, for an expected photon noise of 0.29 mmag. The use of the 4 seasons of data with a better detrending algorithm should yield a sub-millimagnitude precision for this folded lightcurve. Radial velocity follow-up observations are conducted and reveal a F-M binary system. The detection of this 9.9-day period system with a small instrument such as ASTEP South and the precision of the folded lightcurve show the quality of Dome C for continuous photometric observations, and its potential for the detection of planets with orbital period longer than those usually detected from the ground.
  • Due to the strong effect of systematics/trends in variable star observations, we employ the Trend Filtering Algorithm (TFA) on a subset of the MACHO database and search for variable stars. TFA has been applied successfully in planetary transit searches, where weak, short-lasting periodic dimmings are sought in the presence of noise and various systematics (due to, e.g., imperfect flat fielding, crowding, etc). These latter effects introduce colored noise in the photometric time series that can lead to a complete miss of the signal. By using a large number of available photometric time series of a given field, TFA utilizes the fact that the same types of systematics appear in several/many time series of the same field. As a result, we fit each target time series by a (least-square-sense) optimum linear combination of templates and frequency-analyze the residuals. Once a signal is found, we reconstruct the signal by employing the full model, including the signal, systematics and noise. We apply TFA on the brightest ~5300 objects from subsets of each of the MACHO Large Magellanic Cloud fields #1 and #79. We find that the Fourier frequency analysis performed on the original data detect some 60% of the objects as trend-dominated. This figure decreases essentially to zero after using TFA. Altogether, We detect 387 variables in the two fields, 183 of which would have remained undetected without using TFA. Where possible, we give preliminary classification of the variables found.