• We present ALMA observations of the dust continuum and [C II] 158um line emission from the z=6.0695 Lyman Break Galaxy WMH5. These observations at 0.3" spatial resolution show a compact (~3kpc) main galaxy in dust and [C II] emission, with a 'tail' of emission extending to the east by about 5kpc (in projection). The [C II] tail is comprised predominantly of two distinct sub-components in velocity, separated from the core by ~100 and 250km/s, with narrow intrinsic widths of about 80km/s, which we call 'sub-galaxies'. The sub-galaxies themselves are extended east-west by about 3kpc in individual channel images. The [C II] tail joins smoothly into the main galaxy velocity field. The [C II] line to continuum ratios are comparable for the main and sub-galaxy positions, within a factor 2. In addition, these ratios are comparable to z~5.5 LBGs. We conjecture that the WMH5 system represents the early formation of a galaxy through the accretion of smaller satellite galaxies, embedded in a smoother gas distribution, along a possibly filamentary structure. The results are consistent with current cosmological simulations of early galaxy formation, and support the idea of very early enrichment with dust and heavy elements of the accreting material.
  • We present the final data release of the APEX low-redshift legacy survey for molecular gas (ALLSMOG), comprising CO(2-1) emission line observations of 88 nearby, low-mass (10^8.5<M* [M_Sun]<10^10) star-forming galaxies carried out with the 230 GHz APEX-1 receiver on the APEX telescope. The main goal of ALLSMOG is to probe the molecular gas content of more typical and lower stellar mass galaxies than have been studied by previous CO surveys. We also present IRAM 30m observations of the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission lines in nine galaxies aimed at increasing the M*<10^9 M_Sun sample size. In this paper we describe the observations, data reduction and analysis methods and we present the final CO spectra together with archival HI 21cm line observations for the entire sample of 97 galaxies. At the sensitivity limit of ALLSMOG, we register a total CO detection rate of 47%. Galaxies with higher M*, SFR, nebular extinction (A_V), gas-phase metallicity (O/H), and HI gas mass have systematically higher CO detection rates. In particular, the parameter according to which CO detections and non-detections show the strongest statistical differences is the gas-phase metallicity, for any of the five metallicity calibrations examined in this work. We investigate scaling relations between the CO(1-0) line luminosity and galaxy-averaged properties using ALLSMOG and a sub-sample of COLD GASS for a total of 185 sources that probe the local main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies and its +-0.3 dex intrinsic scatter from M* = 10^8.5 M_Sun to M* = 10^11 M_Sun. L'_{CO(1-0)} is most strongly correlated with the SFR, but the correlation with M* is closer to linear and almost comparably tight. The relation between L'_{CO(1-0)} and metallicity is the steepest one, although deeper CO observations of galaxies with A_V<0.5 mag may reveal an as much steep correlation with A_V. [abridged]
  • We present new ALMA observations of the [OIII]88$\mu$m line and high angular resolution observations of the [CII]158$\mu$m line in a normal star forming galaxy at z$=$7.1. Previous [CII] observations of this galaxy had detected [CII] emission consistent with the Ly$\alpha$ redshift but spatially slightly offset relative to the optical (UV-rest frame) emission. The new [CII] observations reveal that the [CII] emission is partly clumpy and partly diffuse on scales larger than about 1kpc. [OIII] emission is also detected at high significance, offset relative to the optical counterpart in the same direction as the [CII] clumps, but mostly not overlapping with the bulk of the [CII] emission. The offset between different emission components (optical/UV and different far-IR tracers) is similar to what observed in much more powerful starbursts at high redshift. We show that the [OIII] emitting clump cannot be explained in terms of diffuse gas excited by the UV radiation emitted by the optical galaxy, but it requires excitation by in-situ (slightly dust obscured) star formation, at a rate of about 7 M$_{\odot}$/yr. Within 20 kpc from the optical galaxy the ALMA data reveal two additional [OIII] emitting systems, which must be star forming companions. We discuss that the complex properties revealed by ALMA in the z$\sim$7.1 galaxy are consistent with expectations by recent models and cosmological simulations, in which differential dust extinction, differential excitation and different metal enrichment levels, associated with different subsystems assembling a galaxy, are responsible for the different appearance of the system when observed with different tracers.
  • We present ALMA observations of cold dust and molecular gas in four high-luminosity, heavily reddened (A$_{\rm{V}} \sim 2.5-6$ mag) Type 1 quasars at $z\sim2.5$ with virial M$_{\rm{BH}} \sim 10^{10}$M$_\odot$, to test whether dusty, massive quasars represent the evolutionary link between submillimetre bright galaxies (SMGs) and unobscured quasars. All four quasars are detected in both the dust continuum and in the $^{12}$CO(3-2) line. The mean dust mass is 6$\times$10$^{8}$M$_\odot$ assuming a typical high redshift quasar spectral energy distribution (T=41K, $\beta$=1.95 or T=47K, $\beta$=1.6). The implied star formation rates are very high - $\gtrsim$1000 M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ in all cases. Gas masses estimated from the CO line luminosities cover $\sim$1-5$\times10^{10}$($\alpha_{\rm{CO}} / 0.8$)M$_\odot$ and the gas depletion timescales are very short - $\sim5-20$Myr. A range of gas-to-dust ratios is observed in the sample. We resolve the molecular gas in one quasar - ULASJ2315$+$0143 ($z=2.561$) - which shows a strong velocity gradient over $\sim$20 kpc. The velocity field is consistent with a rotationally supported gas disk but other scenarios, e.g. mergers, cannot be ruled out at the current resolution of these data. In another quasar - ULASJ1234+0907 ($z=2.503$) - we detected molecular line emission from two millimetre bright galaxies within 200 kpc of the quasar, suggesting that this quasar resides in a significant over-density. The high detection rate of both cold dust and molecular gas in these sources, suggests that reddened quasars could correspond to an early phase in massive galaxy formation associated with large gas reservoirs and significant star formation.
  • We present an analysis of a deep (1$\sigma$=13 $\mu$Jy) cosmological 1.2-mm continuum map based on ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. In the 1 arcmin$^2$ covered by ASPECS we detect nine sources at $>3.5\sigma$ significance at 1.2-mm. Our ALMA--selected sample has a median redshift of $z=1.6\pm0.4$, with only one galaxy detected at z$>$2 within the survey area. This value is significantly lower than that found in millimeter samples selected at a higher flux density cut-off and similar frequencies. Most galaxies have specific star formation rates similar to that of main sequence galaxies at the same epoch, and we find median values of stellar mass and star formation rates of $4.0\times10^{10}\ M_\odot$ and $\sim40~M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, respectively. Using the dust emission as a tracer for the ISM mass, we derive depletion times that are typically longer than 300 Myr, and we find molecular gas fractions ranging from $\sim$0.1 to 1.0. As noted by previous studies, these values are lower than using CO--based ISM estimates by a factor $\sim$2. The 1\,mm number counts (corrected for fidelity and completeness) are in agreement with previous studies that were typically restricted to brighter sources. With our individual detections only, we recover $55\pm4\%$ of the extragalactic background light (EBL) at 1.2 mm measured by the Planck satellite, and we recover $80\pm7\%$ of this EBL if we include the bright end of the number counts and additional detections from stacking. The stacked contribution is dominated by galaxies at $z\sim1-2$, with stellar masses of (1-3)$\times$10$^{10}$ M$_\odot$. For the first time, we are able to characterize the population of galaxies that dominate the EBL at 1.2 mm.
  • We present Karl G Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of CO(2-1) line emission and rest-frame 250GHz continuum emission of the Hyper-Luminous IR Galaxies (HyLIRGs) BRI1202-0725 (z=4.69) and BRI1335-0417 (z=4.41), with an angular resolution as high as 0.15". Our low order CO observations delineate the cool molecular gas, the fuel for star formation in the systems, in unprecedented detail. For BRI1202-0725, line emission is seen from both extreme starburst galaxies: the quasar host and the optically obscured submm galaxy (SMG), in addition to one of the Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies in the group. Line emission from the SMG shows an east-west extension of about 0.6". For Lyalpha-2, the CO emission is detected at the same velocity as [CII] and [NII], indicating a total gas mass ~4.0*10^10 solar masses. The CO emission from BRI1335-0417 peaks at the nominal quasar position, with a prominent northern extension (~1", a possible tidal feature). The gas depletion timescales are ~10^7 years for the three HyLIRGs, consistent with extreme starbursts, while that of Lyalpha-2 may be consistent with main sequence galaxies. We interpret these sources as major star formation episodes in the formation of massive galaxies and supermassive black holes (SMBHs) via gas rich mergers in the early Universe.
  • We present a search for [CII] line and dust continuum emission from optical dropout galaxies at $z>6$ using ASPECS, our ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF). Our observations, which cover the frequency range $212-272$ GHz, encompass approximately the range $6<z<8$ for [CII] line emission and reach a limiting luminosity of L$_{\rm [CII]}\sim$(1.6-2.5)$\times$10$^{8}$ L$_{\odot}$. We identify fourteen [CII] line emitting candidates in this redshift range with significances $>$4.5 $\sigma$, two of which correspond to blind detections with no optical counterparts. At this significance level, our statistical analysis shows that about 60\% of our candidates are expected to be spurious. For one of our blindly selected [CII] line candidates, we tentatively detect the CO(6-5) line in our parallel 3-mm line scan. None of the line candidates are individually detected in the 1.2 mm continuum. A stack of all [CII] candidates results in a tentative detection with $S_{1.2mm}=14\pm5\mu$Jy. This implies a dust-obscured star formation rate (SFR) of $(3\pm1)$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. We find that the two highest--SFR objects have candidate [CII] lines with luminosities that are consistent with the low-redshift $L_{\rm [CII]}$ vs. SFR relation. The other candidates have significantly higher [CII] luminosities than expected from their UV--based SFR. At the current sensitivity it is unclear whether the majority of these sources are intrinsically bright [CII] emitters, or spurious sources. If only one of our line candidates was real (a scenario greatly favored by our statistical analysis), we find a source density for [CII] emitters at $6<z<8$ that is significantly higher than predicted by current models and some extrapolations from galaxies in the local universe.
  • We present direct estimates of the mean sky brightness temperature in observing bands around 99GHz and 242GHz due to line emission from distant galaxies. These values are calculated from the summed line emission observed in a blind, deep survey for specrtal line emission from high redshift galaxies using ALMA (the 'ASPECS' survey). In the 99 GHz band, the mean brightness will be dominated by rotational transitions of CO from intermediate and high redshift galaxies. In the 242GHz band, the emission could be a combination of higher order CO lines, and possibly [CII] 158$\mu$m line emission from very high redshift galaxies ($z \sim 6$ to 7). The mean line surface brightness is a quantity that is relevant to measurements of spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background, and as a potential tool for studying large-scale structures in the early Universe using intensity mapping. While the cosmic volume and the number of detections are admittedly small, this pilot survey provides a direct measure of the mean line surface brightness, independent of conversion factors, excitation, or other galaxy formation model assumptions. The mean surface brightness in the 99GHZ band is: $T_B = 0.94\pm 0.09$ $\mu$K. In the 242GHz band, the mean brightness is: $T_B = 0.55\pm 0.033$ $\mu$K. These should be interpreted as lower limits on the average sky signal, since we only include lines detected individually in the blind survey, while in a low resolution intensity mapping experiment, there will also be the summed contribution from lower luminosity galaxies that cannot be detected individually in the current blind survey.
  • In this work we present an analysis of the behaviour of galaxies in a four-dimensional parameter space defined by stellar mass, metallicity, star formation rate, and molecular gas mass. We analyse a combined sample of 227 galaxies, which draws from a number of surveys across the redshift range 0 < z < 2 (> 90% of the sample at z~0), and covers > 3 decades in stellar mass.Using Principle Component Analysis, we demonstrate that galaxies in our sample lie on a 2-dimensional plane within this 4D parameter space, indicative of galaxies that exist in an equilibrium between gas inflow and outflow. Furthermore, we find that the metallicity of galaxies depends only on stellar mass and molecular gas mass. In other words, gas-phase metallicity has a negligible dependence on star formation rate, once the correlated effect of molecular gas content is accounted for. The well-known `fundamental metallicity relation', which describes a close and tight relationship between metallicity and SFR (at fixed stellar mass) is therefore entirely a by-product of the underlying physical relationship with molecular gas mass (via the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation).
  • We present the analysis of deep HST multi-band imaging of the BDF field specifically designed to identify faint companions around two of the few Ly-alpha emitting galaxies spectroscopically confirmed at z~7 (Vanzella et al. 2011). Although separated by only 4.4 proper Mpc these galaxies cannot generate HII regions large enough to explain visibility of their Ly-alpha line, thus requiring a population of fainter ionizing sources in their vicinity. We use deep HST and VLT-Hawk-I data to select z~7 Lyman break galaxies around the emitters. We select 6 new robust z~7 LBGs at Y~26.5-27.5 whose average spectral energy distribution is consistent with the objects being at the redshift of the close-by Ly-alpha emitters. The resulting number density of z~7 LBGs in the BDF field is a factor ~3-4 higher than expected in random pointings of the same size. We compare these findings with cosmological hydrodynamic plus radiative transfer simulations of a universe with a half neutral IGM: we find that indeed Ly-alpha emitter pairs are only found in completely ionized regions characterized by significant LBG overdensities. Our findings match the theoretical prediction that the first ionization fronts are generated within significant galaxy overdensities and support a scenario where faint, "normal" star-forming galaxies are responsible for reionization.
  • We have analysed 18 ALMA continuum maps in Bands 6 and 7, with rms down to 7.8$\mu$Jy, to derive differential number counts down to 60$\mu$Jy and 100$\mu$Jy at $\lambda=$1.3 mm and $\lambda=$1.1 mm, respectively. The area covered by the combined fields is $\rm 9.5\times10^{-4}deg^2$ at 1.1mm and $\rm 6.6\times10^{-4}deg^{2}$ at 1.3mm. We improved the source extraction method by requiring that the dimension of the detected sources be consistent with the beam size. This method enabled us to remove spurious detections that have plagued the purity of the catalogues in previous studies. We detected 50 faint sources with S/N$>$3.5 down to 60$\mu$Jy, hence improving the statistics by a factor of four relative to previous studies. The inferred differential number counts are $\rm dN/d(Log_{10}S)=1\times10^5~deg^2$ at a 1.1 mm flux $S_{\lambda = 1.1~mm} = 130~\mu$Jy, and $\rm dN/d(Log_{10}S)=1.1\times10^5~deg^2$ at a 1.3 mm flux $\rm S_{\lambda = 1.3~mm} = 60~\mu$Jy. At the faintest flux limits, i.e. 30$\mu$Jy and 40$\mu$Jy, we obtain upper limits on the differential number counts of $\rm dN/d(Log_{10}S) < 7\times10^5~deg^2$ and $\rm dN/d(Log_{10}S)<3\times10^5~deg^2$, respectively. Our results provide a new lower limit to CIB intensity of 17.2${\rm Jy\ deg^{-2}}$ at 1.1mm and of 12.9${\rm Jy\ deg^{-2}}$ at 1.3mm. Moreover, the flattening of the integrated number counts at faint fluxes strongly suggests that we are probably close to the CIB intensity. Our data imply that galaxies with SFR$<40~M_{\odot}/yr$ certainly contribute less than 50% to the CIB while more than 50% of the CIB must be produced by galaxies with $\rm SFR>40~M_{\odot}/yr$. The differential number counts are in nice agreement with recent semi-analytical models of galaxy formation even as low as our faint fluxes. Consequently, this supports the galaxy evolutionary scenarios and assumptions made in these models.
  • We report new deep ALMA observations aimed at investigating the [CII]158um line and continuum emission in three spectroscopically confirmed Lyman Break Galaxies at 6.8<z<7.1, i.e. well within the re-ionization epoch. With Star Formation Rates of SFR ~ 5-15 Msun/yr these systems are much more representative of the high-z galaxy population than other systems targeted in the past by millimeter observations. For the galaxy with the deepest observation we detect [CII] emission at redshift z=7.107, fully consistent with the Lyalpha redshift, but spatially offset by 0.7" (4 kpc) from the optical emission. At the location of the optical emission, tracing both the Lyalpha line and the far-UV continuum, no [CII] emission is detected in any of the three galaxies, with 3sigma upper limits significantly lower than the [CII] emission observed in lower reshift galaxies. These results suggest that molecular clouds in the central parts of primordial galaxies are rapidly disrupted by stellar feedback. As a result, [CII] emission mostly arises from more external accreting/satellite clumps of neutral gas. These findings are in agreement with recent models of galaxy formation. Thermal far-infrared continuum is not detected in any of the three galaxies. However, the upper limits on the infrared-to-UV emission ratio do not exceed those derived in metal- and dust-poor galaxies.
  • The Square Kilometre Array will be a revolutionary instrument for the study of gas in the distant Universe. SKA1 will have sufficient sensitivity to detect and image atomic 21 cm HI in individual galaxies at significant cosmological distances, complementing ongoing ALMA imaging of redshifted high-J CO line emission and far-infrared interstellar medium lines such as [CII] 157.7 um. At frequencies below ~50 GHz, observations of redshifted emission from low-J transitions of CO, HCN, HCO+, HNC, H2O and CS provide insight into the kinematics and mass budget of the cold, dense star-forming gas in galaxies. In advance of ALMA band 1 deployment (35 to 52 GHz), the most sensitive facility for high-redshift studies of molecular gas operating below 50~GHz is the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). Here, we present an overview of the role that the SKA could play in molecular emission line studies during SKA1 and SKA2, with an emphasis on studies of the dense gas tracers directly probing regions of active star-formation.
  • The broad spectral bandwidth at mm and cm-wavelengths provided by the recent upgrades to the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) has made it possible to conduct unbiased searches for molecular CO line emission at redshifts, z > 1.31. We present the discovery of a gas-rich, star-forming galaxy at z = 2.48, through the detection of CO(1-0) line emission in the COLDz survey, through a sensitive, Ka-band (31 to 39 GHz) VLA survey of a 6.5 square arcminute region of the COSMOS field. We argue that the broad line (FWHM ~570 +/- 80 km/s) is most likely to be CO(1-0) at z=2.48, as the integrated emission is spatially coincident with an infrared-detected galaxy with a photometric redshift estimate of z = 3.2 +/- 0.4. The CO(1-0) line luminosity is L'_CO = (2.2 +/- 0.3) x 10^{10} K km/s pc^2, suggesting a cold molecular gas mass of M_gas ~ (2 - 8)x10^{10}M_solar depending on the assumed value of the molecular gas mass to CO luminosity ratio alpha_CO. The estimated infrared luminosity from the (rest-frame) far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) is L_IR = 2.5x10^{12} L_solar and the star-formation rate is ~250 M_solar/yr, with the SED shape indicating substantial dust obscuration of the stellar light. The infrared to CO line luminosity ratio is ~114+/-19 L_solar/(K km/s pc^2), similar to galaxies with similar SFRs selected at UV/optical to radio wavelengths. This discovery confirms the potential for molecular emission line surveys as a route to study populations of gas-rich galaxies in the future.
  • We present ALLSMOG, the APEX Low-redshift Legacy Survey for MOlecular Gas. ALLSMOG is a survey designed to observe the CO(2-1) emission line with the APEX telescope, in a sample of local galaxies (0.01 < z < 0.03), with stellar masses in the range 8.5 < log(M*/Msun) < 10. This paper is a data release and initial analysis of the first two semesters of observations, consisting of 42 galaxies observed in CO(2-1). By combining these new CO(2-1) emission line data with archival HI data and SDSS optical spectroscopy, we compile a sample of low-mass galaxies with well defined molecular gas masses, atomic gas masses, and gas-phase metallicities. We explore scaling relations of gas fraction and gas consumption timescale, and test the extent to which our findings are dependent on a varying CO/H2 conversion factor. We find an increase in the H2/HI mass ratio with stellar mass which closely matches semi-analytic predictions. We find a mean molecular gas fraction for ALLSMOG galaxies of MH2/M* = (0.09 - 0.13), which decreases with stellar mass. We measure a mean molecular gas consumption timescale for ALLSMOG galaxies of 0.4 - 0.7 Gyr. We also confirm the non-universality of the molecular gas consumption timescale, which varies (with stellar mass) from ~100 Myr to ~2 Gyr. Importantly, we find that the trends in the H2/HI mass ratio, gas fraction, and the non-universal molecular gas consumption timescale are all robust to a range of recent metallicity-dependent CO/H2 conversion factors.
  • We present detections of the CO(J= 1-0) emission line in a sample of four massive star-forming galaxies at z~1.5-2.2 obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). Combining these observations with previous CO(2-1) and CO(3-2) detections of these galaxies, we study the excitation properties of the molecular gas in our sample sources. We find an average line brightness temperature ratios of R_{21}=0.70+\-0.16 and R_{31}=0.50+\-0.29, based on measurements for three and two galaxies, respectively. These results provide additional support to previous indications of sub-thermal gas excitation for the CO(3-2) line with a typically assumed line ratio R_{31}~0.5. For one of our targets, BzK-21000, we present spatially resolved CO line maps. At the resolution of 0.18 arcsec (1.5 kpc), most of the emission is resolved out except for some clumpy structure. From this, we attempt to identify molecular gas clumps in the data cube, finding 4 possible candidates. We estimate that <40 % of the molecular gas is confined to giant clumps (~1.5 kpc in size), and thus most of the gas could be distributed in small fainter clouds or in fairly diffuse extended regions of lower brightness temperatures than our sensitivity limit.
  • We report optical VLT FORS2 spectroscopy of the two Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) companions to the quasi-stellar object (QSO) - sub-millimetre galaxy (SMG) system BRI1202-0725 at z = 4.7, which have recently been detected in the [CII]158um line by the Atacama Large Millimetre/Sub-millimetre Array (ALMA). We detect Ly-alpha emission from both sources and so confirm that these Ly-alpha emitter candidates are physically associated with the BRI1202- 0725 system. We also report the lack of detection of any high ionisation emission lines (N V, Si IV, C IV and He II) and find that these systems are likely not photoionised by the quasar, leaving in situ star formation as the main powering source of these LAEs. We also find that both LAEs have Ly-alpha emission much broader (1300 km/s) than the [CII] emission and broader than most LAEs. In addition, both LAEs have roughly symmetric Ly-alpha profiles implying that both systems are within the HII sphere produced by the quasar. This is the first time that the proximity zone of a quasar is probed by exploiting nearby Ly-alpha emitters. We discuss the observational properties of these galaxies in the context of recent galaxy formation models.
  • We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 44 GHz continuum and CO J=2-1 line emission in BR1202-0725 at z=4.7 (a starburst galaxy and quasar pair) and BRI1335-0417 at z=4.4 (also hosting a quasar). With the full 8 GHz bandwidth capabilities of the upgraded VLA, we study the (rest-frame) 250 GHz thermal dust continuum emission for the first time along with the cold molecular gas traced by the Low-J CO line emission. The measured CO J=2-1 line luminosities of BR1202-0725 are L'(CO) = (8.7+/-0.8)x10^10 K km/s pc^2 and L'(CO) = (6.0+/-0.5)x10^10 K km/s pc^2 for the submm galaxy (SMG) and quasar, which are equal to previous measurements of the CO J=5-4 line luminosities implying thermalized line emission and we estimate a combined cold molecular gas mass of ~9x10^10 Msun. In BRI1335-0417 we measure L'(CO) = (7.3+/-0.6)x10^10 K km/s pc^2. We detect continuum emission in the SMG BR1202-0725 North (S(44GHz) = 51+/-6 microJy), while the quasar is detected with S(44GHz) = 24+/-6 microJy and in BRI1335-0417 we measure S(44GHz) = 40+/-7 microJy. Combining our continuum observations with previous data at (rest-frame) far-infrared and cm-wavelengths, we fit three component models in order to estimate the star-formation rates. This spectral energy distribution fitting suggests that the dominant contribution to the observed 44~GHz continuum is thermal dust emission, while either thermal free-free or synchrotron emission contributes less than 30%.
  • We present the various science cases for building Band 1 receivers as part of ALMA's ongoing Development Program. We describe the new frequency range for Band 1 of 35-52 GHz, a range chosen to maximize the receiver suite's scientific impact. We first describe two key science drivers: 1) the evolution of grains in protoplanetary disks and debris disks, and 2) molecular gas in galaxies during the era of re-ionization. Studies of these topics with Band 1 receivers will significantly expand ALMA's Level 1 Science Goals. In addition, we describe a host of other exciting continuum and line science cases that require ALMA's high sensitivity and angular resolution. For example, ALMA Band 1 continuum data will probe the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in galaxy clusters, Very Small Grains and spinning dust, ionized jets from young stars, spatial and flaring studies of Sgr A*, the acceleration sites of solar flares, pulsar wind nebulae, radio supernovae, and X-ray binaries. Furthermore, ALMA Band 1 line data will probe chemical differentiation in cloud cores, complex carbon chain molecules, extragalactic radio recombination lines, masers, magnetic fields through Zeeman effect measurements, molecular outflows from young stars, the co-evolution of star formation and active galactic nuclei, and the molecular content of galaxies at z ~ 3. ALMA provides similar to better sensitivities than the JVLA over 35-50 GHz, with differences increasing with frequency. ALMA's smaller antennas and shorter baselines, greater number of baselines, and single-dish capabilities, however, give it a significant edge for observing extended emission, making wide-field maps (mosaics), or attaining high image fidelity, as required by the described science cases.
  • We use sensitive observations of three high redshift sources; [CII] fine structure and CO(2-1) rotational transitions for the z=6.4 Quasar host galaxy (QSO) J1148+5251, and [CII] and CO(5-4) transitions from the QSO BR1202-0725 and its sub-millimeter companion (SMG) galaxy at z=4.7. We use these observations to place constraints on the quantity Dz = z(CO) - z(CII) for each source where z(CO) and z(CII) are the observed redshifts of the CO rotational transition and [CII] fine structure transition respectively, using a combination of approaches; 1) By modelling the emission line profiles using `shapelets' to compare both the emission redshifts and the line profiles themselves, in order to make inferences about the intrinsic velocity differences between the molecular and atomic gas, and 2) By performing a marginalisation over all model parameters in order to calculate a non-parametric estimate of Dz. We derive 99% confidence intervals for the marginalised posterior of Dz of (-1.9 pm 1.3) x10^-3, (-3 pm 8) x10^-4 and (-2 pm 4) x10^-3 for J1148+5251, and the BR1202-0725 QSO and SMG respectively. We show the [CII] and CO(2-1) line profiles for J1148+5251 are consistent with each other within the limits of the data, whilst the [CII] and CO(5-4) line profiles from the BR1202-0725 QSO and SMG respectively have 65 and >99.9% probabilities of being inconsistent, with the CO(5-4) lines ~ 30% wider than the [CII] lines. Therefore whilst the observed values of Dz can correspond to variations in the quantity Delta F/F with cosmic time, where F=alpha^2/mu, with alpha the fine structure constant, and mu the proton-to-electron mass ratio, of both (-3.3 pm 2.3) x10^-4 for a look back time of 12.9 Gyr and of (-5 pm 15) x10^-5 for a look back time of 12.4 Gyr we propose that they are the result of the two species of gas being spatially separated as indicated by the inconsistencies in their line profiles.
  • We present one of the first resolved maps of the [CII] 158 micron line, a powerful tracer of the star forming inter-stellar medium, at high redshift. We use the new IRAM PdBI receivers at 350 GHz to map this line in BRI 0952-0115, the host galaxy of a lensed quasar at z=4.4 previously found to be very bright in [CII] emission. The [CII] emission is clearly resolved and our data allow us to resolve two [CII] lensed images associated with the optical quasar images. We find that the star formation, as traced by [CII], is distributed over a region of ~ 1 kpc in size near the quasar nucleus, and we infer a star formation surface density >150 Msun/yr/kpc^2, similar to that observed in local ULIRGs. We also reveal another [CII] component, extended over ~ 12 kpc, and located at ~ 10 kpc from the quasar. We suggest that this component is a companion disk galaxy, in the process of merging with the quasar host, whose rotation field is distorted by the interaction with the quasar host, and where star formation, although intense, is more diffuse. These observations suggest that galaxy merging at high-z can enhance star formation at the same time in the form of more compact regions, in the vicinity of the accreting black hole, and in more extended star forming galaxies.
  • We present a set of compelling science cases for the ALMA Band 1 receiver suite. For these cases, we assume in tandem the updated nominal Band 1 frequency range of 35-50 GHz with a likely extension up to 52 GHz; together these frequencies optimize the Band 1 science return. The scope of the science cases ranges from nearby stars to the re-ionization edge of the Universe. Two cases provide additional leverage on the present ALMA Level One Science Goals and are seen as particularly powerful motivations for building the Band 1 Receiver suite: (1) detailing the evolution of grains in protoplanetary disks, as a complement to the gas kinematics, requires continuum observations out to ~35 GHz (~9mm); and (2) detecting CO 3-2 line emission from galaxies like the Milky Way during the epoch of re-ionization, i.e., 6 < z < 10, also requires Band 1 receiver coverage. The range of Band 1 science is wide, however, and includes studies of very small dust grains in the ISM, pulsar wind nebulae, radio supernovae, X-ray binaries, the Galactic Center (i.e., Sgr A*), dense cloud cores, complex carbon-chain molecules, masers, magnetic fields in the dense ISM, jets and outflows from young stars, distant galaxies, and galaxy clusters (i.e., the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect). A comparison of ALMA and the Jansky VLA (JVLA) at the same frequencies of Band 1 finds similar sensitivity performance at 40-50 GHz, with a slight edge for ALMA at higher frequencies (e.g., within a factor of 2 for continuum observations). With its larger number of instantaneous baselines, however, ALMA Band 1data will have greater fidelity than those from the JVLA at similar frequencies.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the [CII] 157.7micron fine structure line and thermal dust continuum emission from a pair of gas-rich galaxies at z=4.7, BR1202-0725. This system consists of a luminous quasar host galaxy and a bright submm galaxy (SMG), while a fainter star-forming galaxy is also spatially coincident within a 4" (25 kpc) region. All three galaxies are detected in the submm continuum, indicating FIR luminosities in excess of 10^13 Lsun for the two most luminous objects. The SMG and the quasar host galaxy are both detected in [CII] line emission with luminosities, L([CII]) = (10.0 +/- 1.5)x10^9 Lsun and L([CII]) = (6.5+/-1.0)x10^9 Lsun, respectively. We estimate a luminosity ratio, L([CII])/L(FIR) = (8.3+/-1.2)x10^-4 for the starburst SMG to the North, and L([CII])/L(FIR) = (2.5+/-0.4)x10^-4 for the quasar host galaxy, in agreement with previous high-redshift studies that suggest lower [CII]-to-FIR luminosity ratios in quasars than in starburst galaxies. The third fainter object with a flux density, S(340GHz) = 1.9+/-0.3 mJy, is coincident with a Ly-Alpha emitter and is detected in HST ACS F775W and F814W images but has no clear counterpart in the H-band. Even if this third companion does not lie at a similar redshift to BR1202-0725, the quasar and the SMG represent an overdensity of massive, infrared luminous star-forming galaxies within 1.3 Gyr of the Big Bang.
  • Line and continuum studies at centimeter through submillimeter wavelengths address probe deep into the earliest, most active and dust obscured phases of galaxy formation, and reveal the molecular and cool atomic gas. We summarize the techniques of radio astronomy to perform these studies, then review the progress on radio studies of galaxy formation. The dominant work over the last decade has focused on massive, luminous starburst galaxies (submm galaxies and AGN host galaxies). The far infrared luminosities are ~ 1e13 Lsun, implying star formation rates, SFR > 1e3 Msun/year. Molecular gas reservoirs are found with masses: M(H_2) > 1e10 (alpha/0.8}) Msun. The CO excitation in these luminous systems is much higher than in low redshift spiral galaxies. Imaging of the gas distribution and dynamics suggests strongly interacting and merging galaxies, indicating gravitationally induced, short duration (~ 1e7 year) starbursts. These systems correspond to a major star formation episode in massive galaxies in proto-clusters at intermediate to high redshift. Recently, radio observations have probed the more typical star forming galaxy population (SFR ~ 100 Msun/year), during the peak epoch of Universal star formation (z ~ 1.5 to 2.5). These observations reveal massive gas reservoirs without hyper-starbursts, and show that active star formation occurs over a wide range in galaxy stellar mass. The conditions in this gas are comparable to those found in the Milky Way disk. A key result is that the peak epoch of star formation in the Universe also corresponds to an epoch when the baryon content of star forming galaxies was dominated by molecular gas, not stars. We consider the possibility of tracing out the dense gas history of the Universe, and perform initial, admittedly gross, calculations. ABRIDGED
  • We present a high resolution (down to 0.18"), multi-transition imaging study of the molecular gas in the z = 4.05 submillimeter galaxy GN20. GN20 is one of the most luminous starburst galaxy known at z > 4, and is a member of a rich proto-cluster of galaxies at z = 4.05 in GOODS-North. We have observed the CO 1-0 and 2-1 emission with the VLA, the CO 6-5 emission with the PdBI Interferometer, and the 5-4 emission with CARMA. The H_2 mass derived from the CO 1-0 emission is 1.3 \times 10^{11} (\alpha/0.8) Mo. High resolution imaging of CO 2-1 shows emission distributed over a large area, appearing as partial ring, or disk, of ~ 10kpc diameter. The integrated CO excitation is higher than found in the inner disk of the Milky Way, but lower than that seen in high redshift quasar host galaxies and low redshift starburst nuclei. The VLA CO 2-1 image at 0.2" resolution shows resolved, clumpy structure, with a few brighter clumps with intrinsic sizes ~ 2 kpc. The velocity field determined from the CO 6-5 emission is consistent with a rotating disk with a rotation velocity of ~ 570 km s^{-1} (using an inclination angle of 45^o), from which we derive a dynamical mass of 3 \times 10^{11} \msun within about 4 kpc radius. The star formation distribution, as derived from imaging of the radio synchrotron and dust continuum, is on a similar scale as the molecular gas distribution. The molecular gas and star formation are offset by ~ 1" from the HST I-band emission, implying that the regions of most intense star formation are highly dust-obscured on a scale of ~ 10 kpc. The large spatial extent and ordered rotation of this object suggests that this is not a major merger, but rather a clumpy disk accreting gas rapidly in minor mergers or smoothly from the proto-intracluster medium. ABSTRACT TRUNCATED