• Enormous Ly$\alpha$ Nebulae (ELANe), unique tracers of galaxy density peaks, are predicted to lie at the nodes and intersections of cosmic filamentary structures. Previous successful searches for ELANe have focused on wide-field narrowband surveys, or have targeted known sources such as ultraluminous quasi-stellar-objects (QSOs) or radio galaxies. Utilizing groups of coherently strong Ly$\alpha$ absorptions (CoSLAs), we have developed a new method to identify high-redshift galaxy overdensities and have identified an extremely massive overdensity, BOSS1441, at $z=2-3$ (Cai et al. 2016a). In its density peak, we discover an ELAN that is associated with a relatively faint continuum. To date, this object has the highest diffuse Ly$\alpha$ nebular luminosity of $L_{\rm{nebula}}=5.1\pm0.1\times10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Above the 2$\sigma$ surface brightness limit of SB$_{\rm{Ly\alpha}}= 4.8\times10^{-18}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ arcsec$^{-2}$, this nebula has an end-to-end spatial extent of 442 kpc. This radio-quiet source also has extended \civ\ $\lambda1549$ and \heii\ $\lambda1640$ emission on $\gtrsim30$ kpc scales. Note that the Ly$\alpha$, \heii\ and \civ\ emission all have double-peaked line profiles. Each velocity component has a full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of $\approx700 - 1000$ km s$^{-1}$. We argue that this Ly$\alpha$ nebula could be powered by shocks due to an AGN-driven outflow or/and photoionization by a strongly obscured source.
  • Because the timescale of H$\alpha$ emission (several tens of Myr) following star formation is significantly shorter than that of UV radiation (a few hundred Myr), the H$\alpha$/UV flux ratio provides insight on the star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies on timescales shorter than $\sim100$ Myr. We present H$\alpha$/UV ratios for galaxies at $z=$ 0.02--0.1 on the familiar star-forming main sequence based on the AKARI-GALEX-SDSS archive dataset. The data provide us with robust measurements of dust-corrected SFRs in both H$\alpha$ and UV for 1,050 galaxies. The results show a correlation between the H$\alpha$/UV ratio and the deviation from the main sequence in the sense that galaxies above/below the main sequence tend to have higher/lower H$\alpha$/UV ratios. This trend increases the dispersion of the main sequence by 0.04 dex (a small fraction of the total scatter of 0.36 dex), suggesting that diversity of recent SFHs of galaxies has a direct impact on the observed main sequence scatter. We caution that the results suffer from incompleteness and a selection bias which may lead us to miss many sources with high H$\alpha$/UV ratios, this could further increase the scatter from SFHs in the star-forming main sequence.
  • Faint star-forming galaxies at $z\sim 2-3$ can be used as alternative background sources to probe the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest in addition to quasars, yielding high sightline densities that enable 3D tomographic reconstruction of the foreground absorption field. Here, we present the first data release from the COSMOS Lyman-Alpha Mapping And Mapping Observations (CLAMATO) Survey, which was conducted with the LRIS spectrograph on the Keck-I telescope. Over an observational footprint of 0.157$\mathrm{deg}^2$ within the COSMOS field, we used 240 galaxies and quasars at $2.17<z<3.00$, with a mean comoving transverse separation of $2.37\,h^{-1}\,\mathrm{Mpc^3}$, as background sources probing the foreground Lyman-$\alpha$ forest absorption at $2.05<z<2.55$. The Lyman-$\alpha$ forest data was then used to create a Wiener-filtered tomographic reconstruction over a comoving volume of $3.15\,\times 10^5\,h^{-3}\,\mathrm{Mpc^3}$ with an effective smoothing scale of $2.5\,h^{-1}\,\mathrm{Mpc}$. In addition to traditional figures, this map is also presented as a virtual-reality YouTube360 video visualization and manipulable interactive figure. We see large overdensities and underdensities that visually agree with the distribution of coeval galaxies from spectroscopic redshift surveys in the same field, including overdensities associated with several recently-discovered galaxy protoclusters in the volume. This data release includes the redshift catalog, reduced spectra, extracted Lyman-$\alpha$ forest pixel data, and tomographic map of the absorption.
  • Post starburst E+A galaxies show indications of a powerful starburst that was quenched abruptly. Their disturbed, bulge-dominated morphologies suggest that they are merger remnants. The more massive E+A galaxies are suggested to be quenched by AGN feedback, yet little is known about AGN-driven winds in this short-lived phase. We present spatially-resolved IFU spectroscopy by the Keck Cosmic Web Imager of SDSS J003443.68+251020.9, at z=0.118. The system consists of two galaxies, the larger of which is a post starburst E+A galaxy hosting an AGN. Our modelling suggests a 400 Myrs starburst, with a peak star formation rate of 120 Msun/yr. The observations reveal stationary and outflowing gas, photoionized by the central AGN. We detect gas outflows to a distance of 17 kpc from the central galaxy, far beyond the region of the stars (about 3 kpc), inside a conic structure with an opening angle of 70 degrees. We construct self-consistent photoionization and dynamical models for the different gas components and show that the gas outside the galaxy forms a continuous flow, with a mass outflow rate of about 24 Msun/yr. The gas mass in the flow, roughly $10^9$ Msun, is larger than the total gas mass within the galaxy, some of which is outflowing too. The continuity of the flow puts a lower limit of 60 Myrs on the duration of the AGN feedback. Such AGN are capable of removing, in a single episode, most of the gas from their host galaxies and expelling enriched material into the surrounding CGM.
  • We report the first detection of the host galaxy of a strong 2175 \AA$ $ dust absorber at z = 2.12 towards the background quasar SDSS J121143.42+083349.7 using HST/WFC3 IR F140W direct imaging and G141 grism spectroscopy. The spectroscopically confirmed host galaxy is located at a small impact parameter of ~ 5.5 kpc (~ 0.65$''$). The F140W image reveals a disk-like morphology with an effective radius of 2.24 $\pm$ 0.08 kpc. The extracted 1D spectrum is dominated by a continuum with weak emission lines ([O\III] and [O\II]). The [O\III]-based unobscured star formation rate (SFR) is 9.4 $\pm$ 2.6 M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$ assuming an [O\III]/H$\alpha$ ratio of 1. The moderate 4000 \AA$ $ break (Dn(4000) index $\sim$ 1.3) and Balmer absorption lines indicate that the host galaxy contains an evolved stellar population with an estimated stellar mass M$_*$ of (3 - 7) $\times$ 10$^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$. The SFR and M$_*$ of the host galaxy are comparable to, though slightly lower than, those of typical emission-selected galaxies at $z$ $\sim$ 2. As inferred from our absorption analysis in Ma et al. (2015, 2017, 2018), the host galaxy is confirmed to be a chemically-enriched, evolved, massive, and star-forming disk-like galaxy that is likely in the transition from a blue star-forming galaxy to a red quiescent galaxy.
  • Cosmological simulations predict that a significant fraction of the low-$z$ baryon budget resides in large-scale filaments in the form of a diffuse plasma at temperatures $T \sim 10^{5} - 10^{7}$ K. However, direct observation of this so-called warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) has been elusive. In the $\Lambda$CDM paradigm, galaxy clusters correspond to the nodes of the cosmic web at the intersection of several large-scale filamentary threads. In previous work, we used HST/COS data to conduct the first survey of broad HI Ly$\alpha$ absorbers (BLAs) potentially produced by WHIM in inter-cluster filaments. We targeted a single QSO, namely Q1410, whose sight-line intersects $7$ independent inter-cluster axes at impact parameters $<3$ Mpc (co-moving), and found a tentative excess of a factor of ${\sim}4$ with respect to the field. Here, we further investigate the origin of these BLAs by performing a blind galaxy survey within the Q1410 field using VLT/MUSE. We identified $77$ sources and obtained the redshifts for $52$ of them. Out of the total sample of $7$ BLAs in inter-cluster axes, we found $3$ without any galaxy counterpart to stringent luminosity limits ($\sim 4 \times 10^{8}$ L$_{\odot}$ ${\sim} 0.01$ L$_{*}$), providing further evidence that these BLAs may represent genuine WHIM detections. We combined this sample with other suitable BLAs from the literature and inferred the corresponding baryon mean density for these filaments in the range $\Omega^{\rm fil}_{\rm bar}= 0.02-0.04$. Our rough estimates are consistent with the predictions from numerical simulations but still subject to large systematic uncertainties, mostly from the adopted geometry, ionization corrections and density profile.
  • We investigate the limitations of statistical absorption measurements with the SDSS optical spectroscopic surveys. We show that changes in the data reduction strategy throughout different data releases have led to a better accuracy at long wavelengths, in particular for sky line subtraction, but a degradation at short wavelengths with the emergence of systematic spectral features with an amplitude of about one percent. We show that these features originate from inaccuracy in the fitting of modeled F-star spectra used for flux calibration. The best-fit models for those stars are found to systematically over-estimate the strength of metal lines and under-estimate that of Lithium. We also identify the existence of artifacts due to masking and interpolation procedures at the wavelengths of the hydrogen Balmer series leading to the existence of artificial Balmer $\alpha$ absorption in all SDSS optical spectra. All these effects occur in the rest-frame of the standard stars and therefore present Galactic longitude variations due to the rotation of the Galaxy. We demonstrate that the detection of certain weak absorption lines reported in the literature are solely due to calibration effects. Finally, we discuss new strategies to mitigate these issues.
  • Enormous Ly$\alpha$ nebulae (ELANe) represent the extrema of Ly$\alpha$ nebulosities. They have detected extents of $>200$ kpc in Ly$\alpha$ and Ly$\alpha$ luminosities $>10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The ELAN population is an ideal laboratory to study the interactions between galaxies and the intergalactic/circumgalactic medium (IGM/CGM) given their brightness and sizes. The current sample size of ELANe is still very small, and the few $z\approx2$ ELANe discovered to date are all associated with local overdensities of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Inspired by these results, we have initiated a survey of ELANe associated with QSO pairs using the Palomar and Keck Cosmic Web Imagers (PCWI/KCWI). In this letter, we present our first result: the discovery of ELAN0101+0201 associated with a QSO pair at $z=2.45$. Our PCWI discovery data shows that, above a 2-$\sigma$ surface brightness of $1.2\times10^{-17}$ \sbunit, the end-to-end size of ELAN0101+0201 is $\gtrsim 232$ kpc. We have conducted follow-up observations using KCWI, resolving multiple Ly$\alpha$ emitting sources within the rectangular field-of-view of $\approx 130\times165$ projected kpc$^2$, and obtaining their emission line profiles at high signal-to-noise ratios. Combining both KCWI and PCWI, our observations confirm that ELAN0101+0201 resides in an extremely overdense environment. Our observations further support that a large amount of cool ($T\sim10^4$K) gas could exist in massive halos (M$\gtrsim10^{13}$M$_\odot$) at $z\approx2$. Future observations on a larger sample of similar systems will provide statistics of how cool gas is distributed in massive overdensities at high-redshift and strongly constrain the evolution of the intracluster medium (ICM).
  • We examine the kinematics of the gas in the environments of galaxies hosting quasars at $z\sim2$. We employ 148 projected quasar pairs to study the circumgalactic gas of the foreground quasars in absorption. The sample selects foreground quasars with precise redshift measurements, using emission-lines with precision $\lesssim300\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}}$ and average offsets from the systemic redshift $\lesssim|100\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}}|$. We stack the background quasar spectra at the foreground quasar's systemic redshift to study the mean absorption in \ion{C}{2}, \ion{C}{4}, and \ion{Mg}{2}. We find that the mean absorptions exhibit large velocity widths $\sigma_v\approx300\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}}$. Further, the mean absorptions appear to be asymmetric about the systemic redshifts. The mean absorption centroids exhibit small redshift relative to the systemic $\delta v\approx+200\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}}$, with large intrinsic scatter in the centroid velocities of the individual absorption systems. We find the observed widths are consistent with gas in gravitational motion and Hubble flow. However, while the observation of large widths alone does not require galactic-scale outflows, the observed offsets suggest that the gas is on average outflowing from the galaxy. The observed offsets also suggest that the ionizing radiation from the foreground quasars is anisotropic and/or intermittent.
  • Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array, we have detected CO(3-2) line and far-infrared continuum emission from a galaxy associated with a high-metallicity ([M/H] = -0.27) damped Ly-alpha absorber (DLA) at z =2.19289. The galaxy is located 3.5" away from the quasar sightline, corresponding to a large impact parameter of 30 kpc at the DLA redshift. We use archival Very Large Telescope-SINFONI data to detect Halpha emission from the associated galaxy, and find that the object is dusty, with a dust-corrected star formation rate of 110 +60 -30 Msun/yr. The galaxy's molecular mass is large, Mmol = (1.4 +- 0.2) x 10^11 x (\alpha_CO/4.3) x (0.57/r_31) Msun, supporting the hypothesis that high-metallicity DLAs arise predominantly near massive galaxies. The excellent agreement in redshift between the CO(3-2) line emission and low-ion metal absorption (~40 km/s) disfavors scenarios whereby the gas probed by the DLA shows bulk motion around the galaxy. We use Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope HI 21cm absorption spectroscopy to find that the HI along the DLA sightline must be warm, with a stringent lower limit on the spin temperature of T_s > 1895 x (f/0.93) K. The detection of CI absorption in the DLA, however, also indicates the presence of cold neutral gas. To reconcile these results requires that the cold components in the DLA contribute little to the HI column density, yet contain roughly 50% of the metals of the absorber, underlining the complex multi-phase nature of the gas surrounding high-z galaxies.
  • We present the cold neutral content (H I and C I gas) of 13 quasar 2175 \AA$ $ dust absorbers (2DAs) at $z$ = 1.6 - 2.5 to investigate the correlation between the presence of the UV extinction bump with other physical characteristics. These 2DAs were initially selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys I - III and followed up with the Keck-II telescope and the Multiple Mirror Telescope as detailed in our Paper I. We perform a correlation analysis between metallicity, redshift, depletion level, velocity width, and explore relationships between 2DAs and other absorption line systems. The 2DAs on average have higher metallicity, higher depletion levels, and larger velocity widths than Damped Lyman-$\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs) or subDLAs. The correlation between [Zn/H] and [Fe/Zn] or [Zn/H] and log$\Delta$V$_{90}$ can be used as alternative stellar mass estimators based on the well-established mass-metallicity relation. The estimated stellar masses of the 2DAs in this sample are in the range of $\sim$ 10$^9$ to $\sim$2 $\times$ 10$^{11}$ $M_{\odot}$ with a median value of $\sim$2 $\times$ 10$^{10}$ $M_{\odot}$. The relationship with other quasar absorption line systems can be described as (1) 2DAs are a subset of Mg II and Fe II absorbers, (2) 2DAs are preferentially metal-strong DLAs/subDLAs, (3) More importantly, all of the 2DAs show C I detections with logN(C I) $>$ 14.0 cm$^{-2}$, (4) 2DAs can be used as molecular gas tracers. Their host galaxies are likely to be chemically enriched, evolved, massive (more massive than typical DLA/subDLA galaxies), and presumably star-forming galaxies.
  • 11 hours after the detection of gravitational wave source GW170817 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Virgo Interferometers, an associated optical transient SSS17a was discovered in the galaxy NGC 4993. While the gravitational wave data indicate GW170817 is consistent with the merger of two compact objects, the electromagnetic observations provide independent constraints of the nature of that system. Here we synthesize all optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SSS17a collected by the One-Meter Two-Hemisphere collaboration. We find that SSS17a is unlike other known transients. The source is best described by theoretical models of a kilonova consisting of radioactive elements produced by rapid neutron capture (the r-process). We find that SSS17a was the result of a binary neutron star merger, reinforcing the gravitational wave result.
  • The merging neutron star gravitational wave event GW170817 has been observed throughout the entire electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to $\gamma$-rays. The resulting energetics, variability, and light curves are shown to be consistent with GW170817 originating from the merger of two neutron stars, in all likelihood followed by the prompt gravitational collapse of the massive remnant. The available $\gamma$-ray, X-ray and radio data provide a clear probe for the nature of the relativistic ejecta and the non-thermal processes occurring within, while the ultraviolet, optical and infrared emission are shown to probe material torn during the merger and subsequently heated by the decay of freshly synthesized $r$-process material. The simplest hypothesis that the non-thermal emission is due to a low-luminosity short $\gamma$-ray burst (sGRB) seems to agree with the present data. While low luminosity sGRBs might be common, we show here that the collective prompt and multi-wavelength observations are also consistent with a typical, powerful sGRB seen off-axis. Detailed follow-up observations are thus essential before we can place stringent constraints on the nature of the relativistic ejecta in GW170817.
  • We discovered Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a) in the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration (LVC) localization volume of GW170817, the first detected binary neutron star (BNS) merger, only 10.9 hours after the trigger. No object was present at the location of SSS17a only a few days earlier, providing a qualitative spatial and temporal association with GW170817. Here we quantify this association, finding that SSS17a is almost certainly the counterpart of GW170817, with the chance of a coincidence being < 9 x 10^-6 (90% confidence). We arrive at this conclusion by comparing the optical properties of SSS17a to other known astrophysical transients, finding that SSS17a fades and cools faster than any other observed transient. For instance, SSS17a fades >5 mag in g within 7 days of our first data point while all other known transients of similar luminosity fade by <1 mag during the same time period. Its spectra are also unique, being mostly featureless, even as it cools. The rarity of "SSS17a-like" transients combined with the relatively small LVC localization volume and recent non-detection imply the extremely unlikely chance coincidence. We find that the volumetric rate of SSS17a-like transients is < 1.6 x 10^4 Gpc^-3 year^-1 and the Milky Way rate is <0.19 per century. A transient survey designed to discover similar events should be high cadence and observe in red filters. The LVC will likely detect substantially more BNS mergers than current optical surveys will independently discover SSS17a-like transients, however a 1-day cadence survey with LSST could discover an order of magnitude more events.
  • We carried out deep H$\alpha$ narrowband imaging with 10 hours net integrations towards the young protocluster, USS1558$-$003 at $z=2.53$ with the Subaru Telescope. This system is composed of four dense groups with massive local overdensities, traced by 107 H$\alpha$ emitters (HAEs) with stellar masses and dust-corrected star formation rates down to $1\times10^8$ M$_\odot$ and 3 M$_\odot$yr$^{-1}$, respectively. We have investigated the environmental dependence of various physical properties within the protocluster by comparing distributions of HAEs in higher and lower densities with a standard Kolmogorov--Smirnov test. At 97\% confidence level, we find enhanced star formation across the star-forming main sequence of HAEs living in the most extreme `supergroup', corresponding to the top quartile of overdensities. Furthermore, we derive distribution functions of H$\alpha$ luminosity and stellar mass in group and intergroup regions, approximately corresponding to 30 times and 8 times higher densities than the general field. As a consequence, we identify by 0.7 and 0.9 dex higher cutoffs in H$\alpha$ luminosity and stellar mass functions in the dense groups, respectively. On the other hand, HAEs in the intergroup environment of the protocluster show similar distribution functions to those of field galaxies despite residing in significant overdensities. In the early phase of cluster formation, as inferred from our results, the densest parts in the protocluster have had an accelerated formation of massive galaxies. We expect that these eventually grow and transform into early-type galaxies at the bright end of the red sequence as seen in present-day rich clusters of galaxies.
  • We have designed, developed, and applied a convolutional neural network (CNN) architecture using multi-task learning to search for and characterize strong HI Lya absorption in quasar spectra. Without any explicit modeling of the quasar continuum nor application of the predicted line-profile for Lya from quantum mechanics, our algorithm predicts the presence of strong HI absorption and estimates the corresponding redshift zabs and HI column density NHI, with emphasis on damped Lya systems (DLAs, absorbers with log NHI > 20.3). We tuned the CNN model using a custom training set of DLAs injected into DLA-free quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), data release 5 (DR5). Testing on a held-back validation set demonstrates a high incidence of DLAs recovered by the algorithm (97.4% as DLAs and 99% as an HI absorber with log NHI > 19.5) and excellent estimates for zabs and NHI. Similar results are obtained against a human-generated survey of the SDSS DR5 dataset. The algorithm yields a low incidence of false positives and negatives but is challenged by overlapping DLAs and/or very high NHI systems. We have applied this CNN model to the quasar spectra of SDSS-DR7 and the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS, data release 12) and provide catalogs of 4,913 and 50,969 DLAs respectively (including 1,659 and 9,230 high-confidence DLAs that were previously unpublished). This work validates the application of deep learning techniques to astronomical spectra for both classification and quantitative measurements.
  • We present a deep search for HI 21-cm emission from the gaseous halo of Messier 31 as part of Project AMIGA, a large program Hubble Space Telescope program to study the circumgalactic medium of the Andromeda galaxy. Our observations with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telesope target sight lines to 48 background AGNs, more than half of which have been observed in the ultraviolet with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, with impact parameters $25 \lesssim \rho \lesssim 330$ kpc ($0.1 \lesssim \rho / R_{\rm vir} \lesssim 1.1$). We do not detect any 21-cm emission toward these AGNs to limits of $N({\rm HI}) \approx 4 \times10^{17}$ cm$^{-2}$ ($5\sigma$, per 2 kpc diameter beam). This column density corresponds to an optical depth of $\sim2.5$ at the Lyman limit, thus our observations overlap with absorption line studies of Lyman limit systems at higher redshift. Our non-detections place a limit on the covering factor of such optically-thick gas around M31 to $f_c < 0.051$ (at 90\% confidence) for $\rho \leq R_{\rm vir}$. While individual clouds have previously been found in the region between M31 and M33, the covering factor of strongly optically-thick gas is quite small. Our upper limits on the covering factor are consistent with expectations from recent cosmological "zoom" simulations. Recent COS-Halos ultraviolet measurements of \HI\ absorption about an ensemble of galaxies at $z \approx 0.2$ show significantly higher covering factors within $\rho \lesssim 0.5 R_{\rm vir}$ at the same $N({\rm H I})$, although the metal ion-to-H I ratios appear to be consistent with those seen in M31.
  • We present 13 new 2175 {\AA} dust absorbers at z_abs = 1.0 - 2.2 towards background quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These absorbers are examined in detail using data from the Echelle Spectrograph and Imager (ESI) on the Keck II telescope. Many low-ionization lines including Fe II, Zn II, Mg II, Si II, Al II, Ni II, Mn II, Cr II, Ti II, and Ca II are present in the same absorber which gives rise to the 2175 {\AA} bump. The relative metal abundances (with respect to Zn) demonstrate that the depletion patterns of our 2175 {\AA} dust absorbers resemble that of the Milky Way clouds although some are disk-like and some are halo-like. The 2175 {\AA} dust absorbers have significantly higher depletion levels compared to literature Damped Lyman-{\alpha} absorbers (DLAs) and subDLAs. The dust depletion level indicator [Fe/Zn] tends to anti-correlate with bump strengths. The velocity profiles from the Keck/ESI spectra also provide kinematical information on the dust absorbers. The dust absorbers are found to have multiple velocity components with velocity widths extending from ~100 to ~ 600 km/s, which are larger than those of most DLAs and subDLAs. Assuming the velocity width is a reliable tracer of stellar mass, the host galaxies of 2175 {\AA} dust absorbers are expected to be more massive than DLA/subDLA hosts. Not all of the 2175 {\AA} dust absorbers are intervening systems towards background quasars. The absorbers towards quasars J1006+1538 and J1047+3423 are proximate systems that could be associated with the quasar itself or the host galaxy.
  • We report the discovery of the Little Cub, an extremely metal-poor star-forming galaxy in the local Universe, found in the constellation Ursa Major (a.k.a. the Great Bear). We first identified the Little Cub as a candidate metal-poor galaxy based on its Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric colors, combined with spectroscopy using the Kast spectrograph on the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory. In this letter, we present high-quality spectroscopic data taken with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer at Keck Observatory, which confirm the extremely metal-poor nature of this galaxy. Based on the weak [O III] 4363 Angstrom emission line, we estimate a direct oxygen abundance of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.13 +/- 0.08, making the Little Cub one of the lowest metallicity star-forming galaxies currently known in the local Universe. The Little Cub appears to be a companion of the spiral galaxy NGC 3359 and shows evidence of gas stripping. We may therefore be witnessing the quenching of a near-pristine galaxy as it makes its first passage about a Milky Way-like galaxy.
  • We present and make publicly available the second data release (DR2) of the Keck Observatory Database of Ionized Absorption toward Quasars (KODIAQ) survey. KODIAQ DR2 consists of a fully-reduced sample of 300 quasars at 0.07 < z_em < 5.29 observed with HIRES at high resolution (36,000 <= R <= 103,000). DR2 contains 831 spectra available in continuum normalized form, representing a sum total exposure time of ~4.9 megaseconds on source. These co-added spectra arise from a total of 1577 individual exposures of quasars taken from the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) in raw form and uniformly processed. DR2 extends DR1 by adding 130 new quasars to the sample, including additional observations of QSOs in DR1. All new data in DR2 were obtained with the single-chip Tektronix TK2048 CCD configuration of HIRES in operation between 1995 and 2004. DR2 is publicly available to the community, housed as a higher level science product at the KOA and in the igmspec database (v03).
  • We present new observations acquired with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer instrument on the Very Large Telescope in a quasar field that hosts a high column-density damped Ly{\alpha} absorber (DLA) at z~3.25. We detect Ly{\alpha} emission from a nebula at the redshift of the DLA with line luminosity (27+/-1)x1e41 erg/s, which extends over 37+/-1 kpc above a surface brightness limit of 6x1e-19 erg/s/cm2/arcsec2 at a projected distance of 30.5+/-0.5 kpc from the quasar sightline. Two clumps lie inside this nebula, both with Ly{\alpha} rest-frame equivalent width > 50 A and with relative line-of-sight velocities aligned with two main absorption components seen in the DLA spectrum. In addition, we identify a compact galaxy at a projected distance of 19.1+/-0.5 kpc from the quasar sightline. The galaxy spectrum is noisy but consistent with that of a star-forming galaxy at the DLA redshift. We argue that the Ly{\alpha} nebula is ionized by radiation from star formation inside the two clumps, or by radiation from the compact galaxy. In either case, these data imply the presence of a structure with size >>50 kpc inside which galaxies are assembling, a picture consistent with galaxy formation in groups and filaments as predicted by cosmological simulations such as the EAGLE simulations.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 870um observations of 29 bright Herschel sources near high-redshift QSOs. The observations confirm that 20 of the Herschel sources are submillimeter-bright galaxies (SMGs) and identify 16 new SMG-QSO pairs that are useful to studies of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of SMGs. Eight out of the 20 SMGs are blends of multiple 870um sources. The angular separations for six of the Herschel-QSO pairs are less than 10", comparable to the sizes of the Herschel beam and the ALMA primary beam. We find that four of these six "pairs" are actually QSOs hosted by SMGs. No additional submillimeter companions are detected around these QSOs and the rest-frame ultraviolet spectra of the QSOs show no evidence of significant reddening. Black hole accretion and star formation contribute almost equally in bolometric luminosity in these galaxies. The SMGs hosting QSOs show similar source sizes, dust surface densities, and SFR surface densities as other SMGs in the sample. We find that the black holes are growing $\sim$3$\times$ faster than the galaxies when compared to the present-day black-hole-galaxy mass ratio, suggesting a QSO duty cycle of $\lesssim$30% in SMGs at z ~ 3. The remaining two Herschel-detected QSOs are undetected at 870um but each has an SMG "companion" only 9" and 12" away (71 and 95 kpc at z = 3). They could be either merging or projected pairs. If the former, they would represent a rare class of "wet-dry" mergers. If the latter, the QSOs would, for the first time, probe the CGM of SMGs at impact parameters below 100 kpc.
  • Post starburst E+A galaxies are thought to have experienced a significant starburst that was quenched abruptly. Their disturbed, bulge-dominated morphologies suggest that they are merger remnants. We present ESI/Keck observations of SDSS J132401.63+454620.6, a post starburst galaxy at redshift z = 0.125, with a starburst that started 400 Myr ago, and other properties, like star formation rate (SFR) consistent with what is measured in ultra luminous infrared galaxies (ULRIGs). The galaxy shows both zero velocity narrow lines, and blueshifted broader Balmer and forbidden emission lines (FWHM=1350 +- 240 km/s). The narrow component is consistent with LINER-like emission, and the broader component with Seyfert-like emission, both photoionized by an active galactic nucleus (AGN) whose properties we measure and model. The velocity dispersion of the broad component exceeds the escape velocity, and we estimate the mass outflow rate to be in the range 4-120 Mo/yr. This is the first reported case of AGN-driven outflows, traced by ionized gas, in post starburst E+A galaxies. We show, by ways of a simple model, that the observed AGN-driven winds can consistently evolve a ULIRG into the observed galaxy. Our findings reinforce the evolutionary scenario where the more massive ULIRGs are quenched by negative AGN feedback, evolve first to post starburst galaxies, and later become typical red and dead ellipticals.
  • We study quasar proximity zones in the redshift range $5.77 \leq z \leq 6.54$ by homogeneously analyzing $34$ medium resolution spectra, encompassing both archival and newly obtained data, and exploiting recently updated systemic redshift and magnitude measurements. Whereas previous studies found strong evolution of proximity zone sizes with redshift, and argued that this provides evidence for a rapidly evolving intergalactic medium (IGM) neutral fraction during reionization, we measure a much shallower trend $\propto(1+z)^{-1.44}$. We compare our measured proximity zone sizes to predictions from hydrodynamical simulations post-processed with one-dimensional radiative transfer, and find good agreement between observations and theory irrespective of the ionization state of the ambient IGM. This insensitivity to IGM ionization state has been previously noted, and results from the fact that the definition of proximity zone size as the first drop of the smoothed quasar spectrum below the $10\%$ flux transmission level probes locations where the ionizing radiation from the quasar is an order of magnitude larger than the expected ultraviolet ionizing background that sets the neutral fraction of the IGM. Our analysis also uncovered three objects with exceptionally small proximity zones (two have $R_p < 1$proper Mpc), which constitute outliers from the observed distribution and are challenging to explain with our radiative transfer simulations. We consider various explanations for their origin, such as strong absorption line systems associated with the quasar or patchy reionization, but find that the most compelling scenario is that these quasars have been shining for $\lesssim 10^5$yr.
  • We study winds in 12 X-ray AGN host galaxies at z ~ 1. We find, using the low-ionization Fe II 2586 absorption in the stacked spectra, that the probability distribution function (PDF) of the centroid velocity shift in AGN has a median, 16th and 84th percentiles of (-87, -251, +86) km/s respectively. The PDF of the velocity dispersion in AGN has a median, 84th and 16th percentile of (139, 253, 52) km/s respectively. The centroid velocity and the velocity dispersions are obtained from a two component (ISM+wind) absorption line model. The equivalent width PDF of the outflow in AGN has median, 84th and 16th percentiles of (0.4, 0.8, 0.1) Angstrom. There is a strong ISM component in Fe II 2586 absorption with (1.2, 1.5, 0.8) Angstrom, implying presence of substantial amount cold gas in the host galaxies. For comparison, star-forming and X-ray undetected galaxies at a similar redshift, matched roughly in stellar mass and galaxy inclination, have a centroid velocity PDF with percentiles of (-74, -258, +90) km/s, and a velocity dispersion PDF percentiles of (150, 259, 57) km/s. Thus, winds in the AGN are similar to star-formation-driven winds, and are too weak to escape and expel substantial cool gas from galaxies. Our sample doubles the previous sample of AGN studied at z ~ 0.5 and extends the analysis to z ~ 1. A joint reanalysis of the z ~ 0.5 AGN sample and our sample yields consistent results to the measurements above.