• We present spectroscopic and photometric observations of the emission-line star MWC 930 (V446 Sct) during its long-term optical brightening in 2006--2013. Based on our earlier data we suggested that the object has features found in Luminous Blue Variables (LBV), such as a high luminosity (~3 10^5 Lsun, a low wind terminal velocity (~ 140 km/s), and a tendency to show strong brightness variations (~1 mag over 20 years). For the last ~7 years it has been exhibiting a continuous optical and near-IR brightening along with a change of the emission-line spectrum appearance and cooling of the star's photosphere. We present the object's $V$--band light curve, analyze the spectral variations, and compare the observed properties with those of other recognized Galactic LBVs, such as AG Car and HR Car. Overall we conclude the MWC 930 is a bona fide Galactic LBV that is currently in the middle of an S Dor cycle.
  • We have studied superionization and X-ray line formation in the spectra of Zeta Pup using our new stellar atmosphere code (XCMFGEN) that can be used to simultaneously analyze optical, UV, and X-ray observations. Here, we present results on the formation of the O VI ll1032, 1038 doublet. Our simulations, supported by simple theoretical calculations, show that clumped wind models that assume void in the interclump space cannot reproduce the observed O VI profiles. However, enough O VI can be produced if the voids are filled by a low density gas. The recombination of O VI is very efficient in the dense material but in the tenuous interclump region an observable amount of O VI can be maintained. We also find that different UV resonance lines are sensitive to different density regimes in Zeta Pup : C IV is almost exclusively formed within the densest regions, while the majority of O VI resides between clumps. N V is an intermediate case, with contributions from both the tenuous gas and clumps.
  • We calculate the hydrogen and helium ionization in B[e] envelopes and explore their dependence on mass-loss and effective temperature. We also present simulated observations of the Halpha emission line and the C IV 1550 doublet, and study their behavior. This paper reports our first results in an ongoing study of B[e] supergiants, and provides a glimpse on the ionization of the most important elements in self-consistent numerical simulations. Our newly developed 2D stellar atmosphere code, ASTAROTH, was used for the numerical simulations. The code self-consistently solves for the continuum radiation, non-LTE level populations, and electron temperature in axi-symmetric stellar envelopes. Observed profiles were calculated by an auxiliary program developed separately from ASTAROTH. In all but one of our models, H remained fully ionized. Due to ionizations from excited states it is much more difficult to get a H neutral disk than indicated by previous analytical calculations. Near the poles, the ionization is high in all models, while helium recombined in the equatorial regions for all but our lowest mass-loss rate. Although the model parameters were not adjusted to provide fits to any particular star, the theoretical profiles show some features seen in the profiles of R126. These include the partially resolved double peaked profile of Halpha, and the weak emission associated with the UV C IV resonance line.
  • We present a new radiative transfer code for axi-symmetric stellar atmospheres and compare test results against 1D and 2D models with and without velocity fields. The code uses the short characteristic method with modifications to handle axi-symmetric and non-monotonic 3D wind velocities, and allows for distributed calculations. The formal solution along a characteristic is evaluated with a resolution that is proportional to the velocity gradient along the characteristic. This allows us to accurately map the variation of the opacities and emissivities as a function of frequency and spatial coordinates, but avoids unnecessary work in low velocity regions. We represent a characteristic with an impact-parameter vector p (a vector that is normal to the plane containing the characteristic and the origin) rather than the traditional unit vector in the direction of the ray. The code calculates the incoming intensities for the characteristics by a single latitudinal interpolation without any further interpolation in the radiation angles. Using this representation also provides a venue for distributed calculations since the radiative transfer can be done independently for each p.
  • We discuss work toward developing a 2.5D non-LTE radiative transfer code. Our code uses the short characteristic method with modifications to handle realistic 3D wind velocities. We also designed this code for parallel computing facilities by representing the characteristics with an impact parameter vector p. This makes the interpolation in the radiation angles unnecessary and allows for an independent calculation for characteristics represented by different p vectors. The effects of the velocity field are allowed for by increasing, as needed, the number of grid points along a short characteristic. This allows us to accurately map the variation of the opacities and emissivities as a function of frequency and spatial coordinates. In the future we plan to use this transfer code with a 2D non-LTE stellar atmosphere program to self-consistently solve for level populations, the radiation field and temperature structure for stars with winds and without spherical symmetry.
  • We have conducted a survey of FUSE spectra of 235 Galactic B-type stars in order to determine the boundaries in the H-R diagram for the production of the superion O VI in their winds. By comparing the locations and morphology of otherwise unidentified absorption features in the vicinity of the O VI resonance doublet with the bona fide wind profiles seen in archival IUE spectra of the resonance lines of N V, Si IV and C IV, we were able to detect blueshifted O VI lines in the spectra of giant and supergiant stars with temperature classes as late as B1. No features attributable to O VI were detected in dwarfs later than B0, or in stars of any luminosity class later than B1, although our ability to recognize weak absorption features in these stars is severely restricted by blending with photospheric and interstellar features. We discuss evidence that the ratio of the ion fractions of O VI and N V is substantially different in the winds of early B-type stars than O-type stars.
  • High quality archival spectra of interstellar absorption from C I toward 9 stars, taken with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, were analyzed. Our sample was supplemented by two sight lines, 23 Ori and B1 Sco, for which the C I measurements of Federman, Welty, & Cardelli were used. Directions with known CH+ absorption, but only upper limits on absorption from C2 and CN, were considered for our study. This restriction allows us to focus on regions where CH+ chemistry dominates the production of carbon-bearing molecules. Profile synthesis of several multiplets yielded column densities and Doppler parameters for the C I fine structure levels. Equilibrium excitation analyses, using the measured column densities as well as the temperature from H2 excitation, led to values for gas density. These densities, in conjunction with measurements of CH, CH+, C2, and CN column densities, provided estimates for the amount of CH associated with CH+ production, which in turn set up constraints on the present theories for CH+ formation in this environment. We found for our sample of interstellar clouds that on average, 30--40 % of the CH originates from CH+ chemistry, and in some cases it can be as high as 90 %. A simple chemical model for gas containing non-equilibrium production of CH+ was developed for the purpose of predicting column densities for CH, CO, HCO+, CH2+, and CH3+ generated from large abundances of CH+. Again, our results suggest that non-thermal chemistry is necessary to account for the observed abundance of CH and probably that of CO in these clouds.
  • We have used the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) to conduct a snap-shot survey of O VI variability in the winds of 66 OB-type stars in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. These time series consist of two or three observations separated by intervals ranging from a few days to several months. Although these time series provide the bare minimum of information required to detect variations, this survey demonstrates that the O VI doublet in the winds of OB-type stars is variable on various scales both in time and velocity. For spectral types from O3 to B1, 64% vary in time. At spectral types later than B1, no wind variability is observed. This fraction represents a lower limit on the true incidence of variability in the O VI wind lines, which is very common and probably ubiquitous. The observed variations extend over several hundreds of km/s of the wind profile and can be strong. The width over which the wind O VI profile varies is only weakly correlated with the terminal velocity (\vinf), but a significant correlation (close to a 1:1 relationship) is derived between the maximum velocity of the variation and \vinf. High velocity O VI wind absorption features (possibly related to the discrete absorption components seen in other wind lines) are also observed in 46% of the cases for spectral types from O3 to B0.5. These features are variable, but the nature of their propagation cannot be determined from this survey. If X-rays can produce sufficient O VI by Auger ionization of O VI, and the X-rays originate from strong shocks in the wind, this study suggests that stronger shocks occur more frequently near \vinf, causing an enhancement of O VI near \vinf.
  • Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer spectra of 22 Galactic halo stars are studied to determine the amount of O VI in the Galactic halo between ~0.3 and \~10 kpc from the Galactic mid-plane. Strong O VI 1031.93 A absorption was detected toward 21 stars, and a reliable 3 sigma upper limit was obtained toward HD 97991. The weaker member of the O VI doublet at 1037.62 A could be studied toward only six stars. The observed columns are reasonably consistent with a patchy exponential O VI distribution with a mid-plane density of 1.7x10^(-8) cm^(-3) and scale height between 2.3 and 4 kpc. We do not see clear signs of strong high-velocity components in O VI absorption along the Galactic sight lines, which indicates the general absence of high velocity O VI within 2-5 kpc of the Galactic mid-plane. The correlation between the H I and O VI intermediate velocity absorption is also poor. The O VI velocity dispersions are much larger than the value of ~18 km/s expected from thermal broadening for gas at T~300,000 K, the temperature at which O VI is expected to reach its peak abundance in collisional ionization equilibrium. Turbulence, inflow, and outflow must have an effect on the shape of the O VI profiles. Kinematical comparisons of O VI with Ar I suggest the presence of two different types of O VI-bearing environments toward the Galactic sight lines. Comparison of O VI with other highly-ionized species suggests that the high ions are produced primarily by cooling hot gas in the Galactic fountain flow, and that turbulent mixing also has a significant contribution. The role of turbulent mixing is most important toward sight lines that sample supernova remnants like Loop I and IV.
  • We analyzed high resolution spectra of interstellar neutral carbon absorption toward $\lambda$ Ori, 1 Sco, and $\delta$ Sco that were obtained with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. Several multiplets were detected within the wavelength interval 1150 to 1200 A, where most neutral carbon lines have ill-defined oscillator strength; multiplets at longer wavelengths with well-defined atomic parameters were also seen. We extracted accurate column densities and Doppler parameters from lines with precise laboratory-based f-values. These column densities and b-values were used to obtain a self-consistent set of f-values for all the observed neutral carbon lines. For many of the lines with wavelength below 1200 A, the derived f-values differ appreciably from the values quoted in the compilation by Morton (1991). The present set of f-values extends and in some cases supersedes those given in Zsargo et al. (1997), which were based on lower resolution data.