• The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is a multiwavelength study of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the local universe. Here we present low resolution Spitzer spectra covering 5-38um and provide a basic analysis of the mid-IR spectral properties for nearby LIRGs. In a companion paper, we discuss detailed fits to the spectra. The GOALS sample of 244 nuclei in 180 luminous and 22 ultraluminous IR galaxies represents a complete subset of the IRAS RBGS and covers a range of merger stages, morphologies and spectral types. The majority (>60%) of GOALS LIRGs have high 6.2um PAH equivalent widths (EQW > 0.4um) and low levels of silicate absorption (s_9.7um >-1.0). There is a general trend among the U/LIRGs for silicate depth and MIR slope to increase with LIR. U/LIRGs in the late stages of a merger also have on average steeper MIR slopes and higher levels of dust obscuration. Together these trends suggest that as gas & dust is funneled towards the center of a coalescing merger, the nuclei become more compact and obscured. The sources that depart from these correlations have very low PAH EQW (EQW < 0.1um) consistent with their MIR emission being dominated by an AGN. The most heavily dust obscured sources are the most compact in their MIR emission, suggesting that the obscuring (cool) dust is associated with the outer regions of the starburst. As the merger progresses a marked decline is seen for the fraction of high EQW (star formation dominated) sources while the fraction of composite sources increases but the fraction of AGN-dominated sources remains low. When compared to the MIR spectra of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at z~2, the average GOALS LIRG is more absorbed at 9.7um and has more PAH emission. However, when the AGN contributions to both the local LIRGs and the high-z SMGs are removed, the average local starbursting LIRG closely resembles the starbursting SMGs.
  • An analysis of data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite is presented for the z=0.036 merging galaxy system II Zw 096 (CGCG 448-020). Because II Zw 096 has an infrared luminosity of log(L_IR/L_sun) = 11.94, it is classified as a Luminous Infrared Galaxy (LIRG), and was observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The Spitzer data suggest that 80% of the total infrared luminosity comes from an extremely compact, red source not associated with the nuclei of the merging galaxies. The Spitzer mid-infrared spectra indicate no high-ionization lines from a buried active galactic nucleus in this source. The strong detection of the 3.3 micron and 6.2 micron PAH emission features in the AKARI and Spitzer spectra also implies that the energy source of II Zw 096 is a starburst. Based on Spitzer infrared imaging and AKARI near-infrared spectroscopy, the star formation rate is estimated to be 120 M_sun/yr and > 45 M_sun/yr, respectively. Finally, the high-resolution B, I, and H-band images show many star clusters in the interacting system. The colors of these clusters suggest at least two populations - one with an age of 1-5 Myr and one with an age of 20-500 Myr, reddened by 0-2 magnitudes of visual extinction. The masses of these clusters span a range between 10^6-10^8 M_sun. This starburst source is reminiscent of the extra-nuclear starburst seen in NGC 4038/9 (the Antennae Galaxies) and Arp 299 but approximately an order of magnitude more luminous than the Antennae. The source is remarkable in that the off-nuclear infrared luminosity dominates the enitre system.
  • The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) combines data from NASA's Spitzer, Chandra, Hubble and GALEX observatories, together with ground-based data into a comprehensive imaging and spectroscopic survey of over 200 low redshift Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs). The LIRGs are a complete subset of the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). The LIRGs targeted in GOALS span the full range of nuclear spectral types defined via traditional optical line-ratio diagrams as well as interaction stages. They provide an unbiased picture of the processes responsible for enhanced infrared emission in galaxies in the local Universe. As an example of the analytic power of the multi-wavelength GOALS dataset, we present data for the interacting system VV 340 (IRAS F14547+2449). Between 80-95% of the total far-infrared emission (or about 5E11 solar luminosities) originates in VV 340 North. While the IRAC colors of VV 340 North and South are consistent with star-forming galaxies, both the Spitzer IRS and Chandra ACIS data indicate the presence of a buried AGN in VV 340 North. The GALEX far and near-UV fluxes imply a extremely large infrared "excess" (IRX) for the system (IR/FUV = 81) which is well above the correlation seen in starburst galaxies. Most of this excess is driven by VV 340 N, which alone has an IR excess of nearly 400. The VV 340 system seems to be comprised of two very different galaxies - an infrared luminous edge-on galaxy (VV 340 North) that dominates the long-wavelength emission from the system and which hosts a buried AGN, and a face-on starburst (VV 340 South) that dominates the short-wavelength emission.