• Anticrossing behavior between magnons in a multiferroic chiral magnet Cu$_2$OSeO$_3$ and a two-mode dielectric resonator cavity was studied in the temperature range 5 - 100 K. We observed a strong coupling regime between ferrimagnetic magnons and two microwave cavity modes with a cooperativity reaching 3600. We measure a coupling strength which scales as the square root of the net magnetization, $g \propto \sqrt{M(T)}$, and demonstrate that the magnetic phase diagram of Cu$_2$OSeO$_3$ can be reconstructed from the measurements of the resonance frequency of a dispersively-coupled cavity mode. An additional avoided crossing between a helimagnon and a cavity mode was observed at low temperatures. Our results reveal a new class of magnetic systems where strong coupling of microwave photons to non-trivial spin textures can be observed.
  • In spin-based quantum information processing devices, the presence of control and detection circuitry can change the local environment of a spin by introducing strain and electric fields, altering its resonant frequencies. These resonance shifts can be large compared to intrinsic spin line-widths and it is therefore important to study, understand and model such effects in order to better predict device performance. Here we investigate a sample of bismuth donor spins implanted in a silicon chip, on top of which a superconducting aluminium micro-resonator has been fabricated. The on-chip resonator provides two functions: first, it produces local strain in the silicon due to the larger thermal contraction of the aluminium, and second, it enables sensitive electron spin resonance spectroscopy of donors close to the surface that experience this strain. Through finite-element strain simulations we are able to reconstruct key features of our experiments, including the electron spin resonance spectra. Our results are consistent with a recently discovered mechanism for producing shifts of the hyperfine interaction for donors in silicon, which is linear with the hydrostatic component of an applied strain.
  • We investigate the electron and nuclear spin coherence properties of ytterbium ($\mathrm{Yb}^{3+}$) ions with non-zero nuclear spin, within an yttrium orthosilicate (Y$_2$SiO$_5$) crystal, with a view to their potential application in quantum memories or repeaters. We find electron spin-lattice relaxation times are maximised at low magnetic field ($<100$ mT) where $g~\sim6$, reaching 5 s at 2.5 K, while coherence times are maximised when addressing ESR transitions at higher fields where $g\sim0.7$ where a Hahn echo measurement yields $T_2$ up to 73 $\mu$s. Dynamical decoupling (XY16) can be used to suppress spectral diffusion and extend the coherence lifetime to over 0.5 ms, close to the limit of instantaneous diffusion. Using Davies electron-nuclear-double-resonance (ENDOR), we performed coherent control of the $^{173}\mathrm{Yb}^{3+}$ nuclear spin and studied its relaxation dynamics. At around 4.5 K we measure a nuclear spin $T_1$ and $T_2$ of 4 and 0.35 ms, respectively, about 4 and 14 times longer than the corresponding times for the electron spin.
  • Although vacuum fluctuations appear to represent a fundamental limit to the sensitivity of electromagnetic field measurements, it is possible to overcome them by using so-called squeezed states. In such states, the noise in one field quadrature is reduced below the vacuum level while the other quadrature becomes correspondingly more noisy, as required by Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. Squeezed optical fields have been proposed and demonstrated to enhance the sensitivity of interferometric measurements beyond the photon shot-noise limit, with applications in gravitational wave detection. They have also been used to increase the sensitivity of atomic absorption spectroscopy, imaging, atom-based magnetometry, and particle tracking in biological systems. At microwave frequencies, cryogenic temperatures are required for the electromagnetic field to be in its vacuum state. Squeezed microwaves have been produced, used for fundamental studies of light-matter interaction and for enhanced sensing of a mechanical resonator, and proposed to enhance the sensitivity of the readout of superconducting qubits. Here we report the use of squeezed microwave fields to enhance the sensitivity of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of an ensemble of electronic spins. Our scheme consists in sending a squeezed vacuum state to the input of a cavity containing the spins while they are emitting an echo, with the phase of the squeezed quadrature aligned with the phase of the echo. We demonstrate a total noise reduction of $1.2$\,dB at the spectrometer output due to the squeezing. These results provide a motivation to examine the application of the full arsenal of quantum metrology to magnetic resonance detection.
  • Spontaneous emission of radiation is one of the fundamental mechanisms by which an excited quantum system returns to equilibrium. For spins, however, spontaneous emission is generally negligible compared to other non-radiative relaxation processes because of the weak coupling between the magnetic dipole and the electromagnetic field. In 1946, Purcell realized that the spontaneous emission rate can be strongly enhanced by placing the quantum system in a resonant cavity -an effect which has since been used extensively to control the lifetime of atoms and semiconducting heterostructures coupled to microwave or optical cavities, underpinning single-photon sources. Here we report the first application of these ideas to spins in solids. By coupling donor spins in silicon to a superconducting microwave cavity of high quality factor and small mode volume, we reach for the first time the regime where spontaneous emission constitutes the dominant spin relaxation mechanism. The relaxation rate is increased by three orders of magnitude when the spins are tuned to the cavity resonance, showing that energy relaxation can be engineered and controlled on-demand. Our results provide a novel and general way to initialise spin systems into their ground state, with applications in magnetic resonance and quantum information processing. They also demonstrate that, contrary to popular belief, the coupling between the magnetic dipole of a spin and the electromagnetic field can be enhanced up to the point where quantum fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the spin dynamics; as such our work represents an important step towards the coherent magnetic coupling of individual spins to microwave photons.
  • We report pulsed electron-spin resonance (ESR) measurements on an ensemble of Bismuth donors in Silicon cooled at 10mK in a dilution refrigerator. Using a Josephson parametric microwave amplifier combined with high-quality factor superconducting micro-resonators cooled at millikelvin temperatures, we improve the state-of-the-art sensitivity of inductive ESR detection by nearly 4 orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the detection of 1700 bismuth donor spins in silicon within a single Hahn echo with unit signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio, reduced to just 150 spins by averaging a single Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. This unprecedented sensitivity reaches the limit set by quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field instead of thermal or technical noise, which constitutes a novel regime for magnetic resonance.