• We present Suzaku X-ray observations along two edge regions of the Fermi Bubbles, with eight ~20 ksec pointings across the northern part of the North Polar Spur (NPS) surrounding the north bubble and six across the southernmost edge of the south bubble. After removing compact X-ray features, diffuse X-ray emission is clearly detected and is well reproduced by a three-component spectral model consisting of unabsorbed thermal emission (temperature kT ~0.1 keV from the Local Bubble (LB), absorbed kT ~0.3 keV thermal emission related to the NPS and/or Galactic Halo (GH), and a power-law component at a level consistent with the cosmic X-ray background. The emission measure (EM) of the 0.3 keV plasma decreases by ~50% toward the inner regions of the north-east bubble, with no accompanying temperature change. However, such a jump in the EM is not clearly seen in the south bubble data. While it is unclear if the NPS originates from a nearby supernova remnant or is related to previous activity within/around the Galactic Center, our Suzaku observations provide evidence suggestive of the latter scenario. In the latter framework, the presence of a large amount of neutral matter absorbing the X-ray emission as well as the existence of the kT ~ 0.3 keV gas can be naturally interpreted as a weak shock driven by the bubbles' expansion in the surrounding medium, with velocity v_exp ~300 km/s (corresponding to shock Mach number M ~1.5), compressing the GH gas to form the NPS feature. We also derived an upper limit for any non-thermal X-ray emission component associated with the bubbles and demonstrate, that in agreement with the findings above, the non-thermal pressure and energy estimated from a one-zone leptonic model of its broad-band spectrum, are in rough equilibrium with that of the surrounding thermal plasma.
  • We have developed a prototype of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) readout system for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Large Size Telescope (LST). Two thousand PMTs along with their readout systems are arranged on the focal plane of each telescope, with one readout system per 7-PMT cluster. The Cherenkov light pulses generated by the air showers are detected by the PMTs and amplified in a compact, low noise and wide dynamic range gain block. The output of this block is then digitized at a sampling rate of the order of GHz using the Domino Ring Sampler DRS4, an analog memory ASIC developed at Paul Scherrer Institute. The sampler has 1,024 capacitors per channel and four channels are cascaded for increased depth. After a trigger is generated in the system, the charges stored in the capacitors are digitized by an external slow sampling ADC and then transmitted via Gigabit Ethernet. An onboard FPGA controls the DRS4, trigger threshold, and Ethernet transfer. In addition, the control and monitoring of the Cockcroft-Walton circuit that provides high voltage for the 7-PMT cluster are performed by the same FPGA. A prototype named Dragon has been developed that has successfully sampled PMT signals at a rate of 2 GHz, and generated single photoelectron spectra.
  • We report on a detailed investigation of the gamma-ray emission from 18 broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) based on two years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. We confirm the previously reported detections of 3C 120 and 3C 111 in the GeV photon energy range; a detailed look at the temporal characteristics of the observed gamma-ray emission reveals in addition possible flux variability in both sources. No statistically significant gamma-ray detection of the other BLRGs was however found in the considered dataset. Though the sample size studied is small, what appears to differentiate 3C 111 and 3C 120 from the BLRGs not yet detected in gamma-rays is the particularly strong nuclear radio flux. This finding, together with the indications of the gamma-ray flux variability and a number of other arguments presented, indicate that the GeV emission of BLRGs is most likely dominated by the beamed radiation of relativistic jets observed at intermediate viewing angles. In this paper we also analyzed a comparison sample of high accretion-rate Seyfert 1 galaxies, which can be considered radio-quiet counterparts of BLRGs, and found none were detected in gamma-rays. A simple phenomenological hybrid model applied for the broad-band emission of the discussed radio-loud and radio-quiet type 1 active galaxies suggests that the relative contribution of the nuclear jets to the accreting matter is > 1 percent on average for BLRGs, whilst <0.1 percent for Seyfert 1 galaxies.
  • We report on a detailed investigation of the high-energy gamma-ray emission from NGC\,1275, a well-known radio galaxy hosted by a giant elliptical located at the center of the nearby Perseus cluster. With the increased photon statistics, the center of the gamma-ray emitting region is now measured to be separated by only 0.46' from the nucleus of NGC1275, well within the 95% confidence error circle with radius ~1.5'. Early Fermi-LAT observations revealed a significant decade-timescale brightening of NGC1275 at GeV photon energies, with a flux about seven times higher than the one implied by the upper limit from previous EGRET observations. With the accumulation of one-year of Fermi-LAT all-sky-survey exposure, we now detect flux and spectral variations of this source on month timescales, as reported in this paper. The average >100 MeV gamma-ray spectrum of NGC1275 shows a possible deviation from a simple power-law shape, indicating a spectral cut-off around an observed photon energy of E = 42.2+-19.6 GeV, with an average flux of F = (2.31+-0.13) X 10^{-7} ph/cm^2/s and a power-law photon index, Gamma = 2.13+-0.02. The largest gamma-ray flaring event was observed in April--May 2009 and was accompanied by significant spectral variability above E > 1-2 GeV. The gamma-ray activity of NGC1275 during this flare can be described by a hysteresis behavior in the flux versus photon index plane. The highest energy photon associated with the gamma-ray source was detected at the very end of the observation, with the observed energy of E = 67.4GeV and an angular separation of about 2.4' from the nucleus. In this paper we present the details of the Fermi-LAT data analysis, and briefly discuss the implications of the observed gamma-ray spectral evolution of NGC1275 in the context of gamma-ray blazar sources in general.
  • We report X-ray imaging of the powerful FR-II radio galaxy 3C353 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. 3C353's two 4"-wide and 2'-long jets allow us to study in detail the internal structure of the large-scale relativistic outflows at both radio and X-ray photon energies with the sub-arcsecond spatial resolution. In a 90 ks Chandra observation, we have detected X-ray emission from most radio structures in 3C353, including the nucleus, the jet and the counterjet, the terminal jet regions (hotspots), and one radio lobe. We show that the detection of the X-ray emission associated with the radio knots and counterknots puts several crucial constraints on the X-ray emission mechanisms in powerful large-scale jets of quasars and FR-II sources. In particular, we show that this detection is inconsistent with the inverse-Compton model proposed in the literature, and instead implies a synchrotron origin of the X-ray jet photons. We also find that the width of the X-ray counterjet is possibly narrower than that measured in radio bands, that the radio-to-X-ray flux ratio decreases systematically downstream along the jets, and that there are substantial (kpc-scale) offsets between the positions of the X-ray and radio intensity maxima within each knot, whose magnitudes increase away from the nucleus. We discuss all these findings in the wider context of the physics of extragalactic jets, proposing some particular though not definitive solutions or interpretations for each problem.
  • We present the results from a multiwavelength campaign of the powerful Gamma-ray quasar PKS 1510-089. This campaign commenced with a deep Suzaku observation lasting three days for a total exposure time of 120 ks, and continued with Swift monitoring over 18 days. Besides Swift observations, the campaign included ground-based optical and radio data, and yielded a quasi-simultaneous broad-band spectral energy distribution from 10^9 Hz to 10^{19} Hz. The Suzaku observation provided a high S/N X-ray spectrum, which is well represented by an extremely hard power-law with photon index Gamma ~ 1.2, augmented by a soft component apparent below 1 keV, which is well described by a black-body model with temperature kT ~ 0.2 keV. Monitoring by Suzaku revealed temporal variability which is different between the low and high energy bands, again suggesting the presence of a second, variable component in addition to the primary power-law emission.We model the broadband spectrum of PKS 1510-089 assuming that the high energy spectral component results from Comptonization of infrared radiation produced by hot dust located in the surrounding molecular torus. In the adopted internal shock scenario, the derived model parameters imply that the power of the jet is dominated by protons but with a number of electrons/positrons exceeding a number of protons by a factor ~10. We also find that inhomogeneities responsible for the shock formation, prior to the collision may produce bulk-Compton radiation which can explain the observed soft X-ray excess and possible excess at ~18 keV. We note, however, that the bulk-Compton interpretation is not unique, and the observed soft excess could arise as well via some other processes discussed briefly in the text.
  • We have studied the performance of large area avalanche photodiodes (APDs) recently developed by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K, in high-resolution X-rays and Gamma-rays detections. We show that reach-through APD can be an excellent soft X-ray detector operating at room temperature or moderately cooled environment. We obtain the best energy resolution ever achieved with APDs, 6.4 % for 5.9 keV X-rays, and obtain the energy threshold as low as 0.5 keV measured at -20deg. Thanks to its fast timing response, signal carriers in the APD device are collected within a short time interval of 1.9 nsec (FWHM). This type of APDs can therefore be used as a low-energy, high-counting particle monitor onboard the forthcoming Pico-satellite Cute1.7. As a scintillation photon detector, reverse-type APDs have a good advantage of reducing the dark noise significantly. The best FWHM energy resolutions of 9.4+-0.3 % and 4.9+-0.2 % were obtained for 59.5 keV and 662 keV Gamma-rays, respectively, as measured with a CsI(Tl) crystal. Combination of APDs with various other scintillators (BGO, GSO, and YAP) also showed better results than that obtained with a photomultiplier tube (PMT). These results suggest that APD could be a promising device for replacing traditional PMT usage in some applications. In particular 2-dim APD array, which we present in this paper, will be a promising device for a wide-band X-ray and Gamma-ray imaging detector in future space research and nuclear medicine.
  • Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are promising light sensor for various fields of experimental physics. It has been argued, however, that variation of APD gain with temperature could be a serious problem preventing APDs from replacing traditional photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in some applications. Here we develop an active gain-control system to keep the APD gain stable under moderate temperature variations. As a performance demonstration of the proposed system, we have tested the response of a scintillation photon detector consisting of a 5x5 mm^2 reverse-type APD optically coupled with a CsI(Tl) crystal. We show that the APD gain was successfully controlled under a temperature variation of DT = 20deg, within a time-cycle of 6000 sec. The best FWHM energy resolution of 6.1+-0.2 % was obtained for 662 keV gamma-rays, and the energy threshold was as low as 6.5 keV, by integrating data from +20deg - 0deg cycles. The corresponding values for -20deg - 0deg cycles were 6.9+-0.2 % and 5.2 keV, respectively. These results are comparable, or only slightly worse than that obtained at a fixed temperature. Our results suggest new potential uses for APDs in various space researches and nuclear physics. As examples, we briefly introduce the NeXT and Cute-1.7 satellite missions that will carry the APDs as scientific instruments for the first time.
  • We study the temporal/spectral variability of two extragalactic TeV sources, Mrk 421 and Mrk 501, based on 5-year observations with the ASCA and RXTE satellites. We found that the peak of the synchrotron emission exists just in the X-ray band and its position shifted from lower to higher energy when the source became brighter. Relationship between the peak energy and peak luminosity showed quite different behavior in the two sources; Mrk 421 showed very little change in the peak position (0.5-2 keV), while Mrk 501 revealed the largest shift ever observed in blazars (1-100 keV). We analyze these X-ray data with the flux changes in TeV band, which are obtained from 35 truly simultateneous observations. Very different spectral evolution of both objects indicates some differences in the electron acceleration mechanism at work during the flares. We argue that the flux variability of Mrk 421 is associated with an increase in the number of electrons, while the flare of Mrk 501 is mostly due to the large changes in maximum energy of electrons. We also discuss the characteristic temporal variability of TeV sources, and implications for the X-ray emitting site in the relativistic jet.