• We present the first results from our on-going Australia Telescope Compact Array survey of CO(1-0) in ALMA-identified submillimetre galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. Strong detections of CO(1-0) emission from two submillimetre galaxies, ALESS 122.1 (z = 2.0232) and ALESS 67.1 (z = 2.1230), were obtained. We estimate gas masses of M_gas ~ 1.3 \times 10^{11} M_odot and M_gas ~ 1.0 \times 10^{11} M_\odot for ALESS 122.1 and ALESS 67.1, respectively, adopting alpha_CO = 1.0. Dynamical mass estimates from the kinematics of the CO(1-0) line yields M_dyn (sin i)^2 = 2.1 +- 1.1 \times 10^{11} M_odot and (3.2 +- 0.9) \times 10^{11} M_\odot for ALESS 122.1 and ALESS 67.1, respectively. This is consistent with the total baryonic mass estimates of these two systems. We examine star formation efficiency using the L_FIR versus L'_CO(1-0) relation for samples of local ULIRGs and LIRGs, and more distant star-forming galaxies, with CO(1-0) detections. We find some evidence of a shallower slope for ULIRGs and SMGs compared to less luminous systems, but a larger sample is required for definite conclusions. We determine gas-to-dust ratios of 170 +- 30 and 140 +- 30 for ALESS 122.1 and ALESS 67.1, respectively, showing ALESS 122.1 has an unusually large gas reservoir. By combining the 38.1 GHz continuum detection of ALESS 122.1 with 1.4 and 5.5 GHz data, we estimate that the free-free contribution to radio emission at 38.1 GHz is 34 +- 17 microJy, yielding a star formation rate (1400 +- 700 M_\odot yr^{-1}) consistent with that from the infrared luminosity.
  • We describe the search for Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) near the sub-millimeter bright starburst galaxy HFLS3 at $z$$=$6.34 and a study on the environment of this massive galaxy during the end of reionization.We performed two independent selections of LBGs on images obtained with the \textit{Gran Telescopio Canarias} (GTC) and the \textit{Hubble Space Telescope} (HST) by combining non-detections in bands blueward of the Lyman-break and color selection. A total of 10 objects fulfilling the LBG selection criteria at $z$$>$5.5 were selected over the 4.54 and 55.5 arcmin$^2$ covered by our HST and GTC images, respectively. The photometric redshift, UV luminosity, and the star-formation rate of these sources were estimated with models of their spectral energy distribution. These $z$$\sim$6 candidates have physical properties and number densities in agreement with previous results. The UV luminosity function at $z$$\sim$6 and a Voronoi tessellation analysis of this field shows no strong evidence for an overdensity of relatively bright objects (m$_{F105W}$$<$25.9) associated with \textit{HFLS3}. However, the over-density parameter deduced from this field and the surface density of objects can not excluded definitively the LBG over-density hypothesis. Moreover we identified three faint objects at less than three arcseconds from \textit{HFLS3} with color consistent with those expected for $z$$\sim$6 galaxies. Deeper data are needed to confirm their redshifts and to study their association with \textit{HFLS3} and the galaxy merger that may be responsible for the massive starburst.
  • We separate the extragalactic radio source population above ~50 uJy into active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-forming sources. The primary method of our approach is to fit the infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), constructed using Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS and Herschel/SPIRE photometry, of 380 radio sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. From the fitted SEDs, we determine the relative AGN and star-forming contributions to their infrared emission. With the inclusion of other AGN diagnostics such as X-ray luminosity, Spitzer/IRAC colours, radio spectral index and the ratio of star-forming total infrared flux to k-corrected 1.4 GHz flux density, qIR, we determine whether the radio emission in these sources is powered by star formation or by an AGN. The majority of these radio sources (60 per cent) show the signature of an AGN at some wavelength. Of the sources with AGN signatures, 58 per cent are hybrid systems for which the radio emission is being powered by star formation. This implies that radio sources which have likely been selected on their star formation have a high AGN fraction. Below a 1.4 GHz flux density of 1 mJy, along with finding a strong contribution to the source counts from pure star-forming sources, we find that hybrid sources constitute 20-65 per cent of the sources. This result suggests that hybrid sources have a significant contribution, along with sources that do not host a detectable AGN, to the observed flattening of the source counts at ~1mJy for the extragalactic radio source population.
  • We present a study of the radio properties of 870$\mu$m-selected submillimetre galaxies (SMGs), observed at high resolution with ALMA in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. From our initial sample of 76 ALMA SMGs, we detect 52 SMGs at $>3\sigma$ significance in VLA 1400MHz imaging, of which 35 are also detected at $>3\sigma$ in new 610MHz GMRT imaging. Within this sample of radio-detected SMGs, we measure a median radio spectral index $\alpha_{610}^{1400} = -0.79 \pm 0.06$, (with inter-quartile range $\alpha=[-1.16,-0.56]$) and investigate the far-infrared/radio correlation via the parameter $q_{\rm IR}$, the logarithmic ratio of the rest-frame 8-1000$\mu$m flux and monochromatic radio flux. Our median $q_{\rm IR} = 2.56 \pm 0.05$ (inter-quartile range $q_{\rm IR}=[2.42,2.78]$) is higher than that typically seen in single-dish 870$\mu$m-selected sources ($q_{\rm IR} \sim 2.4$), which may reflect the fact that our ALMA-based study is not biased to radio-bright counterparts, as previous samples were. Finally, we search for evidence that $q_{\rm IR}$ and $\alpha$ evolve with age in a co-dependent manner, as predicted by starburst models: the data populate the predicted region of parameter space, with the stellar mass tending to increase along tracks of $q_{\rm IR}$ versus $\alpha$ in the direction expected, providing the first observational evidence in support of these models.
  • Stellar archeology shows that massive elliptical galaxies today formed rapidly about ten billion years ago with star formation rates above several hundreds solar masses per year (M_sun/yr). Their progenitors are likely the sub-millimeter-bright galaxies (SMGs) at redshifts (z) greater than 2. While SMGs' mean molecular gas mass of 5x10^10 M_sun can explain the formation of typical elliptical galaxies, it is inadequate to form ellipticals that already have stellar masses above 2x10^11 M_sun at z ~ 2. Here we report multi-wavelength high-resolution observations of a rare merger of two massive SMGs at z = 2.3. The system is currently forming stars at a tremendous rate of 2,000 M_sun/yr. With a star formation efficiency an order-of-magnitude greater than that of normal galaxies, it will quench the star formation by exhausting the gas reservoir in only ~200 million years. At a projected separation of 19 kiloparsecs, the two massive starbursts are about to merge and form a passive elliptical galaxy with a stellar mass of ~4x10^11 M_sun. Our observations show that gas-rich major galaxy mergers, concurrent with intense star formation, can form the most massive elliptical galaxies by z ~ 1.5.
  • The wide-area imaging surveys with the {\it Herschel} Space Observatory at sub-mm wavelengths have now resulted in catalogs of order one hundred thousand dusty, star-burst galaxies. We make a statistical estimate of $N(z)$ using a clustering analysis of sub-mm galaxies detected at each of 250, 350 and 500 $\mu$m from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) centered on the Bo\"{o}tes field. We cross-correlate {\it Herschel} galaxies against galaxy samples at optical and near-IR wavelengths from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey (NDWFS) and the Spitzer Deep Wide Field Survey (SDWFS). We create optical and near-IR galaxy samples based on their photometric or spectroscopic redshift distributions and test the accuracy of those redshift distributions with similar galaxy samples defined with catalogs of the Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS), as the COSMOS field has superior spectroscopy coverage. We model-fit the clustering auto and cross-correlations of {\it Herschel} and optical/IR galaxy samples to estimate $N(z)$ and clustering bias factors. The $S_{350} > 20$ mJy galaxies have a bias factor varying with redshift as $b(z)=1.0^{+1.0}_{-0.5}(1+z)^{1.2^{+0.3}_{-0.7}}$. This bias and the redshift dependence is broadly in agreement with galaxies that occupy dark matter halos of mass in the range of 10$^{12}$ to 10$^{13}$ M$_{\sun}$. We find that the redshift distribution peaks around $z \sim 0.5$ to 1 for galaxies selected at 250 $\mu$m with an average redshift of $< z > = 1.8 \pm 0.2$. For 350 and 500 $\mu$m-selected SPIRE samples the peak shifts to higher redshift, but the average redshift remains the same with a value of $1.9 \pm 0.2$.