• Low mass star-forming regions are more complex than the simple spherically symmetric approximation that is often assumed. We apply a more realistic infall/outflow physical model to molecular/continuum observations of three late Class 0 protostellar sources with the aims of (a) proving the applicability of a single physical model for all three sources, and (b) deriving physical parameters for the molecular gas component in each of the sources. We have observed several molecular species in multiple rotational transitions. The observed line profiles were modelled in the context of a dynamical model which incorporates infall and bipolar outflows, using a three dimensional radiative transfer code. This results in constraints on the physical parameters and chemical abundances in each source. Self-consistent fits to each source are obtained. We constrain the characteristics of the molecular gas in the envelopes as well as in the molecular outflows. We find that the molecular gas abundances in the infalling envelope are reduced, presumably due to freeze-out, whilst the abundances in the molecular outflows are enhanced, presumably due to dynamical activity. Despite the fact that the line profiles show significant source-to-source variation, which primarily derives from variations in the outflow viewing angle, the physical parameters of the gas are found to be similar in each core.
  • We present a model for the formation of large organic molecules in dark clouds. The molecules are produced in the high density gas-phase that exists immediately after ice mantles are explosively sublimated. The explosions are initiated by the catastrophic recombination of trapped atomic hydrogen. We propose that, in molecular clouds, the processes of freeze-out onto ice mantles, accumulation of radicals, explosion and then rapid (three-body) gas-phase chemistry occurs in a cyclic fashion. This can lead to a cumulative molecular enrichment of the interstellar medium. A model of the time-dependent chemistries, based on this hypothesis, shows that significant abundances of large molecular species can be formed, although the complexity of the species is limited by the short expansion timescale in the gas, immediately following mantle explosion. We find that this mechanism may be an important source of smaller organic species, such as methanol and formaldehyde, as well as precursors to bio-molecule formation. Most significantly, we predict the gas-phase presence of these larger molecular species in quiescent molecular clouds and not just dynamically active regions, such as hot cores. As such the mechanism that we propose complements alternative methods of large molecule formation, such as those that invoke solid-state chemistry within activated ice mantles.
  • The Gould Belt Legacy Survey will map star-forming regions within 500 pc, using HARP (Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme), SCUBA-2 (Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2) and POL-2 (Polarimeter 2) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). This paper describes HARP observations of the J = 3-2 transitions of 13CO and C18O towards Orion A. The 1500-resolution observations cover 5 pc of the Orion filament, including OMC1 (inc. BN-KL and Orion Bar), OMC 2/3 and OMC 4, and allow a comparative study of the molecular gas properties throughout the star-forming cloud. The filament shows a velocity gradient of ~1 km/s /pc between OMC 1, 2 and 3, and high velocity emission is detected in both isotopologues. The Orion Nebula and Bar have the largest masses and line widths, and dominate the mass and energetics of the high velocity material. Compact, spatially resolved emission from CH3CN, 13CH3OH, SO, HCOOCH3, C2H5OH, CH3CHO and CH3OCHO is detected towards the Orion Hot Core. The cloud is warm, with a median excitation temperature of ~24 K; the Orion Bar has the highest excitation temperature gas, at >80 K. The C18O excitation temperature correlates well with the dust temperature (to within 40%). The C18O emission is optically thin, and the 13CO emission is marginally optically thick; despite its high mass, OMC 1 shows the lowest opacities. A virial analysis indicates that Orion A is too massive for thermal or turbulent support, but is consistent with a model of a filamentary cloud that is threaded by helical magnetic fields. The variation of physical conditions across the cloud is reflected in the physical characteristics of the dust cores....continued
  • As part of a JCMT Legacy Survey of star formation in the Gould Belt, we present early science results for Taurus. CO J=3-2 maps have been secured along the north-west ridge and bowl, collectively known as L 1495, along with deep 13CO and C18O J=3-2 maps in two sub-regions. With these data we search for molecular outflows, and use the distribution of flows, HH objects and shocked H2 line emission features, together with the population of young stars, protostellar cores and starless condensations to map star formation across this extensive region. In total 21 outflows are identified. It is clear that the bowl is more evolved than the ridge, harbouring a greater population of T Tauri stars and a more diffuse, more turbulent ambient medium. By comparison, the ridge contains a much younger, less widely distributed population of protostars which, in turn, is associated with a greater number of molecular outflows. We estimate the ratio of the numbers of prestellar to protostellar cores in L 1495 to be ~ 1.3-2.3, and of gravitationally unbound starless cores to (gravitationally bound) prestellar cores to be ~ 1. If we take previous estimates of the protostellar lifetime of ~ 5 x 10^5 yrs, this indicates a prestellar lifetime of 9(+/-3) x 10^5 yrs. From the number of outflows we also crudely estimate the star formation efficiency in L 1495, finding it to be compatible with a canonical value of 10-15 %. We note that molecular outflow-driving sources have redder near-IR colours than their HH jet-driving counterparts. We also find that the smaller, denser cores are associated with the more massive outflows, as one might expect if mass build-up in the flow increases with the collapse and contraction of the protostellar envelope.
  • The Gould Belt Legacy Survey will survey nearby star-forming regions (within 500 pc), using HARP (Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme), SCUBA-2 (Submillimetre Common- User Bolometer Array 2) and POL-2 (Polarimeter 2) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). This paper describes the initial data obtained using HARP to observe 12CO, 13CO and C18O J = 3 - 2 towards two regions in Orion B, NGC 2024 and NGC 2071. We describe the physical characteristics of the two clouds, calculating temperatures and opacities utilizing all three isotopologues. We find good agreement between temperatures calculated from CO and from dust emission in the dense, energetic regions. We determine the mass and energetics of the clouds, and of the high-velocity material seen in 12CO emission, and compare the relative energetics of the high- and low-velocity material in the two clouds. We present a CLUMPFIND analysis of the 13CO condensations. The slope of the condensation mass functions, at the high-mass ends, is similar to the slope of the initial mass function.
  • Photon-dominated regions (PDRs) are powerful molecular line emitters in external galaxies. They are expected in galaxies with high rates of massive star formation due to either starburst (SB) events or starburst coupled with active galactic nuclei (AGN) events. We have explored the PDR chemistry for a range of physical conditions representing a variety of galaxy types. Our main result is a demonstration of the sensitivity of the chemistry to changes in the physical conditions. We adopt crude estimates of relevant physical parameters for several galaxy types and use our models to predict suitable molecular tracers of those conditions. The set of recommended molecular tracers differs from that which we recommended for use in galaxies with embedded massive stars. Thus, molecular observations can in principle be used to distinguish between excitation by starburst and by SB+AGN in distant galaxies. Our recommendations are intended to be useful in preparing Herschel and ALMA proposals to identify sources of excitation in galaxies.
  • We present the first detection of CS in the Antennae galaxies towards the NGC 4038 nucleus, as well as the first detections of two high-J (5-4 and 7-6) CS lines in the center of M 82. The CS(7-6) line in M 82 shows a profile that is surprisingly different to those of other low-J CS transitions we observed. This implies the presence of a separate, denser and warmer molecular gas component. The derived physical properties and the likely location of the CS(7-6) emission suggests an association with the supershell in the centre of M 82.
  • Hot core molecules should be detectable in external active galaxies out to high redshift. We present here a detailed study of the chemistry of star-forming regions under physical conditions that differ significantly from those likely to be appropriate in the Milky Way Galaxy. We examine, in particular, the trends in molecular abundances as a function of time with respect to changes in the relevant physical parameters. These parameters include metallicity, dust:gas mass ratio, the H$_{2}$ formation rate, relative initial elemental abundances, the cosmic ray ionization rate, and the temperature of hot cores. These trends indicate how different tracers provide information on the physical conditions and on evolutionary age. We identify hot core tracers for several observed galaxies that are considered to represent spirals, active galaxies, low-metallicity galaxies, and high-redshift galaxies. Even in low-metallicity examples, many potential molecular tracers should be present at levels high enough to allow unresolved detection of active galaxies at high redshift containing large numbers of hot cores.
  • CO isotopes are able to probe the different components in protostellar clouds. These components, core, envelope and outflow have distinct physical conditions and sometimes more than one component contributes to the observed line profile. In this study we determine how CO isotope abundances are altered by the physical conditions in the different components. We use a 3D molecular line transport code to simulate the emission of four CO isotopomers, 12CO J=2-1, 13CO J=2-1, C18O J=2-1 and C17O J=2-1 from the Class 0/1 object L483, which contains a cold quiescent core, an infalling envelope and a clear outflow. Our models replicate JCMT (James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) line observations with the inclusion of freeze-out, a density profile and infall. Our model profiles of 12CO and 13CO have a large linewidth due to a high velocity jet. These profiles replicate the process of more abundant material being susceptible to a jet. C18O and C17O do not display such a large linewidth as they trace denser quiescent material deep in the cloud.
  • The ionization fraction is an important factor in determining the chemical and physical evolution of star forming regions. In the dense, dark starless cores of such objects, the ionization rate is dominated by cosmic rays; it is therefore possible to use simple analytic estimators, based on the relative abundances of different molecular tracers, to determine the cosmic ray ionization rate. This paper uses a simple model to investigate the accuracy of two well-known estimators in dynamically evolving molecular clouds. It is found that, although the analytical formulae based on the abundances of H3+,H2,CO,O,H2O and HCO+ give a reasonably accurate measure of the cosmic ray ionization rate in static, quiescent clouds, significant discrepancies occur in rapidly evolving (collapsing) clouds. As recent evidence suggests that molecular clouds may consist of complex, dynamically evolving sub-structure, we conclude that simple abundance ratios do not provide reliable estimates of the cosmic ray ionization rate in dynamically active regions.