• We review the subject of central exclusive particle production at high energy hadron colliders. In particular we consider reactions of the type A + B -> A + X + B, where X is a fully specified system of particles that is well separated in rapidity from the outgoing beam particles. We focus on the case where the colliding particles are strongly interacting and mainly they will be protons (or antiprotons) as at the ISR, SppS, Tevatron and LHC. The data are surveyed and placed within the context of theoretical developments.
  • We investigate the theoretical description of the central exclusive production process, h1+h2 -> h1+X+h2. Taking Higgs production as an example, we sum logarithmically enhanced corrections appearing in the perturbation series to all orders in the strong coupling. Our results agree with those originally presented by Khoze, Martin and Ryskin except that the scale appearing in the Sudakov factor, mu=0.62 \sqrt{\hat{s}}, should be replaced with mu=\sqrt{\hat{s}}, where \sqrt{\hat{s}} is the invariant mass of the centrally produced system. We confirm this result using a fixed-order calculation and show that the replacement leads to approximately a factor 2 suppression in the cross-section for central system masses in the range 100-500 GeV.
  • We compute the rate for diffractive upsilon meson production at the Tevatron and the LHC. The upsilon is produced diffractively via the subprocess gamma + p -> upsilon + p where the initial photon is radiated off an incoming proton (or antiproton). We consider the possibility to use low angle proton detectors to make a measurement of the gamma p cross-section and conclude that a measurement of the cross-section at a centre of mass energy in excess of 1 TeV is possible at the LHC. This is in the region where saturation effects are likely to reveal themselves.
  • After a brief introduction to the physics of soft gluons in QCD we present a surprising prediction. Dijet production in hadron-hadron collisions provides the paradigm, i.e. h_1 +h_2 \to jj+X. In particular, we look at the case where there is a restriction placed on the emission of any further jets in the region in between the primary (highest p_T) dijets. Logarithms in the ratio of the jet scale to the veto scale can be summed to all orders in the strong coupling. Surprisingly, factorization of collinear emissions fails at scales above the veto scale and triggers the appearance of double logarithms in the hard sub-process. The effect appears first at fourth order relative to the leading order prediction and is subleading in the number of colours.
  • After a brief resume of the theory underpinning the central exclusive process (CEP) pp \to p+H+p, attention is focussed upon Higgs bosons produced in the Standard Model, the MSSM and the NMSSM. In all cases, CEP adds significantly to the physics potential of the LHC and in some scenarios it may be crucial.
  • We present the FP420 R&D project, which has been studying the key aspects of the development and installation of a silicon tracker and fast-timing detectors in the LHC tunnel at 420 m from the interaction points of the ATLAS and CMS experiments. These detectors would measure precisely very forward protons in conjunction with the corresponding central detectors as a means to study Standard Model (SM) physics, and to search for and characterise New Physics signals. This report includes a detailed description of the physics case for the detector and, in particular, for the measurement of Central Exclusive Production, pp --> p + phi + p, in which the outgoing protons remain intact and the central system phi may be a single particle such as a SM or MSSM Higgs boson. Other physics topics discussed are gamma-gamma and gamma-p interactions, and diffractive processes. The report includes a detailed study of the trigger strategy, acceptance, reconstruction efficiencies, and expected yields for a particular p p --> p H p measurement with Higgs boson decay in the b-bbar mode. The document also describes the detector acceptance as given by the LHC beam optics between the interaction points and the FP420 location, the machine backgrounds, the new proposed connection cryostat and the moving ("Hamburg") beam-pipe at 420 m, and the radio-frequency impact of the design on the LHC. The last part of the document is devoted to a description of the 3D silicon sensors and associated tracking performances, the design of two fast-timing detectors capable of accurate vertex reconstruction for background rejection at high-luminosities, and the detector alignment and calibration strategy.
  • In a previous paper we reported the discovery of super-leading logarithmic terms in a non-global QCD observable. In this short update we recalculate the first super-leading logarithmic contribution to the 'gaps between jets' cross-section using a colour basis independent notation. This sheds light on the structure and origin of the super-leading terms and allows them to be calculated for gluon scattering processes for the first time.
  • The simplest supersymmetric model that solves the mu problem and in which the GUT-scale parameters need not be finely tuned in order to predict the correct value of the Z boson mass at low scales is the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM). However, in order that fine tuning be absent, the lightest CP-even Higgs boson h should have mass ~100 GeV and SM couplings to gauge bosons and fermions. The only way that this can be consistent with LEP limits is if h decays primarily via h->aa->4 tau or 4j but not 4b, where a is the lighter of the two pseudo-scalar Higgses that are present in the NMSSM. Interestingly, m_a < 2 m_b is natural in the NMSSM with m_a > 2 m_tau somewhat preferred. Thus, h -> 4 tau becomes a key mode of interest. Meanwhile, all other Higgs bosons of the NMSSM are typically quite heavy. Detection of any of the NMSSM Higgs bosons at the LHC in this preferred scenario will be very challenging using conventional channels. In this paper, we demonstrate that the h -> aa -> 4 tau decay chain should be visible if the Higgs is produced in the process pp -> p+h+p with the final state protons being measured using suitably installed forward detectors. Moreover, we show that the mass of both the h and the a can be determined on an event-by-event basis.
  • We reconsider the calculation of a non-global QCD observable and find the possible breakdown of QCD coherence. This breakdown arises as a result of wide angle soft gluon emission developing a sensitivity to emission at small angles and it leads to the appearance of super-leading logarithms. We use the `gaps between jets' cross-section as a concrete example and illustrate that the new logarithms are intimately connected with the presence of Coulomb gluon contributions. Numerical estimates of their potential phenomenological significance are presented.
  • We confront a very wide body of HERA diffractive electroproduction data with the predictions of the colour dipole model. We focus upon three different parameterisations of the dipole scattering cross-section and find good agreement for all observables. There can be no doubting the success of the dipole scattering approach and more precise observations are needed in order to expose its limitations.
  • We examine the possibility of producing gluino pairs at the LHC via the exclusive reaction pp -> p+gluino+gluino+p in the case where the gluinos are long lived. Such long lived gluinos are possible if the scalar super-partners have large enough masses. We show that it may be possible to observe the gluinos via their conversion to R-hadron jets and measure their mass to better than 1% accuracy for masses below 350 GeV with 300/fb of data.
  • We reconsider the calculation of a non-global QCD observable and find the possible breakdown of QCD coherence. This breakdown arises as a result of wide angle soft gluon emission developing a sensitivity to emission at small angles and it leads to the appearance of super-leading logarithms. We use the `gaps between jets' cross-section as a concrete example and illustrate that the new logarithms are intimately connected with the presence of Coulomb gluon contributions. We present some rough estimates of their potential phenomenological significance.
  • We review the calculation for Higgs production via the exclusive reaction pp -> p+H+p. In the first part we review in some detail the calculation of the Durham group and emphasise the main areas of uncertainty. Afterwards, we comment upon other calculations.
  • We use perturbative QCD to calculate the parton level cross section for the production of two jets that are far apart in rapidity, subject to a limitation on the total transverse momentum Q0 in the interjet region. We specifically address the question of how to combine the approach which sums all leading logarithms in Q/Q0 (where Q is the jet transverse momentum) with the BFKL approach, in which leading logarithms of the scattering energy are summed. This paper constitutes progress towards the simultaneous summation of all important logarithms. Using an "all orders" matching, we are able to obtain results for the cross section which correctly reproduce the two approaches in the appropriate limits.
  • We use data on the deep inelastic structure function F_2 in order to constrain the cross-section for scattering a colour dipole off a proton. The data seem to prefer parameterisations which include saturation effects. That is they indicate that the strong rise with energy of the dipole cross-section, which holds for small dipoles, pertains only for r < r_s(x) where r_s(x) decreases monotonically as x decreases. Subsequent predicitions for the diffractive structure function F_2^{D(3)} also hint at saturation, although the data are not really sufficiently accurate.
  • We confront the colour glass condensate motivated dipole model parameterization of Iancu, Itakura and Munier with the available HERA data on the diffractive structure function F2D3 and with existing dipole model parameterizations. Reasonably good agreement is found with only two adjustable parameters. We caution against interpreting the success of the model as compelling evidence for low-x perturbative saturation dynamics.
  • Diffractive vector meson photoproduction accompanied by proton dissociation is studied for large momentum transfer. The process is described by the non-forward BFKL equation, for which a complete analytical solution is found. The scattering amplitudes for all combinations of helicity are presented.
  • Light CP-violating Higgs bosons with mass lower than 70 GeV might have escaped detection in direct searches at the LEP collider. They may remain undetected in conventional search channels at the Tevatron and LHC. In this Letter we show that exclusive diffractive reactions may be able to probe for the existence of these otherwise elusive Higgs particles. As a prototype example, we calculate diffractive production cross-sections of the lightest Higgs boson within the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with explicit CP violation. Our analysis shows that the challenging regions of parameter space corresponding to a light CP-violating Higgs boson might be accessible at the LHC provided suitable proton tagging detectors are installed.
  • We explore the diffractive interaction of a proton with an anti-proton which results in centrally produced dijets. This process has been recently studied at the Tevatron. We make predictions within an Ingelman-Schlein approach and compare them to the recent data presented by the CDF collaboration. Earlier calculations resulted in theoretical cross-sections which are much larger than those observed by CDF. We find that, after consideration of hadronisation effects and the parton shower, and using parton density functions extracted from diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA, it is possible to explain the CDF data. We need to assume a gap survival probability of around 10% and this is in good agreement with the value predicted by theory. We also find that the non-diffractive contribution to the process is probably significant in the kinematical region probed by the Tevatron.
  • We explore QCD calculations for the process gamma p -> V X where V is a vector meson, in the region s >> -t and -t >> Lambda_QCD^2. We compare our calculations for the J/psi, phi and rho mesons with data from the ZEUS Collaboration at HERA and demonstrate that the BFKL approach is consistent with the data even for light mesons, whereas the two-gluon exchange approach is inadequate. We also predict the differential cross-sections for the Upsilon and omega for which no data are currently available.
  • A detailed study is presented of elastic WW scattering in the scenario that there are no new particles discovered prior to the commissioning of the LHC. We work within the framework of the electroweak chiral lagrangian and two different unitarisation protocols are investigated. Signals and backgrounds are simulated to the final-state-particle level. A new technique for identifying the hadronically decaying W is developed, which is more generally applicable to massive particles which decay to jets where the separation of the jets is small. The effect of different assumptions about the underlying event is also studied. We conclude that the channel WW -> jj+l+nu may contain scalar and/or vector resonances which could be measurable after 100 fb^(-1) of LHC data.
  • We perform a global fit to high energy precision electroweak data in a Higgs model containing the usual isospin doublet plus a real isospin triplet. The analysis is performed in terms of the oblique parameters S, T and U and we show that the mass of the lightest Higgs boson can be as large as 2 TeV.
  • The diffractive production of vector bosons at the Tevatron is studied. We take a hard pomeron flux and use the H1 parton density functions extracted from their measurement of F_2^{D(3)}. To this we add a reggeon exchange contribution. We find that the ratio of diffractive to non-diffractive W boson production is in good agreement with the CDF data. We note that the poorly understood reggeon contribution might be as large as the pomeron contribution in the kinematic range of the data. We also note that our pomeron exchange contribution is much smaller than earlier predictions due to our use of a hard pomeron flux. All our results have been obtained using the lowest order matrix elements and we have compared to the results obtained using a modified version of Herwig which is capable of generating a wide variety of diffractive scattering processes. Gap survival is estimated using Pythia and is found to be around 60%. We make predictions which could be compared to future measurements of diffractive Drell-Yan production.
  • We describe a formalism for solving the BFKL equation with a coupling that runs for momenta above a certain infrared cutoff. By suitably choosing matching conditions proper account is taken of the fact that the BFKL diffusion implies that the solution in the infrared (fixed coupling) regime depends upon the solution in the ultraviolet (running coupling) regime and vice versa. Expanding the BFKL kernel to a given order in the ratio of the transverse momenta allows arbitrary accuracy to be achieved.
  • We calculate the subjet rates for jets produced in hadron collisions. The kt algorithm is used to define the jets and allows the theoretical calculation to sum both the leading and next-to-leading logarithms in the resolution variable, ycut. We also ensure that our calculation matches exactly the leading order in alpha_s result and has sensible behaviour near thresholds.