• Despite remarkable progress in developing multifunctional materials, spin-driven ferroelectrics featuring both spontaneous magnetization and electric polarization are still rare. Among such ferromagnetic ferroelectrics are conical spin spiral magnets with a simultaneous reversal of magnetization and electric polarization that is still little understood. Such materials can feature various multiferroic domains that complicates their study. Here we study the multiferroic domains in ferromagnetic ferroelectric Mn$_{2}$GeO$_{4}$ using neutron diffraction, and show that it features a double-Q conical magnetic structure that, apart from trivial 180 degree commensurate magnetic domains, can be described by ferromagnetic and ferroelectric domains only. We show unconventional magnetoelectric couplings such as the magnetic-field-driven reversal of ferroelectric polarization with no change of spin-helicity, and present a phenomenological theory that successfully explains the magnetoelectric coupling. Our measurements establish Mn$_{2}$GeO$_{4}$ as a conceptually simple multiferroic in which the magnetic-field-driven flop of conical spin spirals leads to the simultaneous reversal of magnetization and electric polarization.
  • Magnetic frustration and low dimensionality can prevent long range magnetic order and lead to exotic correlated ground states. SrDy$_2$O$_4$ consists of magnetic Dy$^{3+}$ ions forming magnetically frustrated zig-zag chains along the c-axis and shows no long range order to temperatures as low as $T=60$ mK. We carried out neutron scattering and AC magnetic susceptibility measurements using powder and single crystals of SrDy$_2$O$_4$. Diffuse neutron scattering indicates strong one-dimensional (1D) magnetic correlations along the chain direction that can be qualitatively accounted for by the axial next-nearest neighbour Ising (ANNNI) model with nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor exchange $J_1=0.3$ meV and $J_2=0.2$ meV, respectively. Three-dimensional (3D) correlations become important below $T^*\approx0.7$ K. At $T=60$ mK, the short range correlations are characterized by a putative propagation vector $\textbf{k}_{1/2}=(0,\frac{1}{2},\frac{1}{2})$. We argue that the absence of long range order arises from the presence of slowly decaying 1D domain walls that are trapped due to 3D correlations. This stabilizes a low-temperature phase without long range magnetic order, but with well-ordered chain segments separated by slowly-moving domain walls.
  • We report small-angle neutron scattering studies of the lacunar spinel GaV$_4$S$_8$, which reveal the long-wavelength magnetic states to be cycloidally modulated. This provides direct support for the formation of N\'eel-type skyrmions recently claimed to exist in this compound. In striking contrast with all other bulk skyrmion host materials, upon cooling the modulated magnetic states transform into a ferromagnetic state. These results indicate all of the modulated states in GaV$_4$S$_8$, including the skyrmion state, gain their stability from thermal fluctuations, while at lower temperature the ferromagnetic state emerges in accord with the strong easy-axis magnetic anisotropy. In the vicinity of the transition between the ferromagnetic and modulated states, both a phase coexistence and a soliton-like state are also evidenced by our study.
  • At ambient pressure (P) and below 5.5 K, olivine-type Mn2GeO4 hosts a multiferroic (MF) phase where a multicomponent, i.e., multi-k magnetic order generates spontaneous ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity (FE) along the c axis. Under high P the FE disappears above 6 GPa, yet the P evolution of the magnetic structure remained unclear based on available data. Here we report high P single crystal neutron diffraction experiments in theMF phase at T = 4.5 K.We observe clearly that the incommensurate spiral component of the magnetic order responsible for FE varies little with P up to 5.1 GPa. With support from high P synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements at room temperature (T), the P driven suppression of FE is proposed to occur as a consequence of a crystal structure transition away from the olivine structure. In addition, in the low T neutron scattering experiments an emergent nonhydrostatic P component, i.e., a uniaxial stress, leads to the selection of certain multi-k domains. We use this observation to deduce a double-k conical magnetic structure for the ambient P ground state, this being a key ingredient for a model description of the MF phase.
  • Skyrmions, topologically-protected nanometric spin vortices, are being investigated extensively in various magnets. Among them, many of structurally-chiral cubic magnets host the triangular-lattice skyrmion crystal (SkX) as the thermodynamic equilibrium state. However, this state exists only in a narrow temperature and magnetic-field region just below the magnetic transition temperature $T_\mathrm{c}$, while a helical or conical magnetic state prevails at lower temperatures. Here we describe that for a room-temperature skyrmion material, $\beta$-Mn-type Co$_8$Zn$_8$Mn$_4$, a field-cooling via the equilibrium SkX state can suppress the transition to the helical or conical state, instead realizing robust metastable SkX states that survive over a very wide temperature and magnetic-field region, including down to zero temperature and up to the critical magnetic field of the ferromagnetic transition. Furthermore, the lattice form of the metastable SkX is found to undergo reversible transitions between a conventional triangular lattice and a novel square lattice upon varying the temperature and magnetic field. These findings exemplify the topological robustness of the once-created skyrmions, and establish metastable skyrmion phases as a fertile ground for technological applications.
  • Uniquely in Cu2OSeO3, the Skyrmions, which are topologically protected magnetic spin vortex-like objects, display a magnetoelectric coupling and can be manipulated by externally applied electric (E) fields. Here, we explore the E-field coupling to the magnetoelectric Skyrmion lattice phase, and study the response using neutron scattering. Giant E-field induced rotations of the Skyrmion lattice are achieved that span a range of $\sim$25$^{\circ}$. Supporting calculations show that an E-field-induced Skyrmion distortion lies behind the lattice rotation. Overall, we present a new approach to Skyrmion control that makes no use of spin-transfer torques due to currents of either electrons or magnons.
  • We have observed a magnetic vortex lattice (VL) in BaFe2(As_{0.67}P_{0.33})2 (BFAP) single crystals by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). With the field along the c-axis, a nearly isotropic hexagonal VL was formed in the field range from 1 to 16 T, which is a record for this technique in the pnictides, and no symmetry changes in the VL were observed. The temperature-dependence of the VL signal was measured and confirms the presence of (non d-wave) nodes in the superconducting gap structure for measurements at 5 T and below. The nodal effects were suppressed at high fields. At low fields, a VL reorientation transition was observed between 1 T and 3 T, with the VL orientation changing by 45{\deg}. Below 1 T, the VL structure was strongly affected by pinning and the diffraction pattern had a fourfold symmetry. We suggest that this (and possibly also the VL reorientation) is due to pinning to defects aligned with the crystal structure, rather than being intrinsic.
  • Using SQUID magnetometry techniques, we have studied the change in magnetization versus applied ac electric field, i.e. the magnetoelectric (ME) susceptibility dM/dE, in the chiral-lattice ME insulator Cu2OSeO3. Measurements of the dM/dE response provide a sensitive and efficient probe of the magnetic phase diagram, and we observe clearly distinct responses for the different magnetic phases, including the skyrmion lattice phase. By combining our results with theoretical calculation, we estimate quantitatively the ME coupling strength as {\lambda} = 0.0146 meV/(V/nm) in the conical phase. Our study demonstrates the ME susceptibility to be a powerful, sensitive and efficient technique for both characterizing and discovering new multiferroic materials and phases.
  • RbFe(MoO4)2 is a quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) triangular lattice antiferromagnet (TLA) that displays a zero-field magnetically-driven multiferroic phase with a chiral spin structure. By inelastic neutron scattering, we determine quantitatively the spin Hamiltonian. We show that the easy-plane anisotropy is nearly 1/3 of the dominant spin exchange, making RbFe(MoO4)2 an excellent system for studying the physics of the model 2D easy-plane TLA. Our measurements demonstrate magnetic-field induced fluctuations in this material to stabilize the generic finite-field phases of the 2D XY TLA. We further explain how Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions can generate ferroelectricity only in the zero field phase. Our conclusion is that multiferroicity in RbFe(MoO4)2, and its absence at high fields, results from the generic properties of the 2D XY TLA.
  • The vortex lattice (VL) in the high-kappa superconductor YBa2Cu3O7, at 2 K and with the magnetic field parallel to the crystal c-axis, undergoes a sequence of transitions between different structures as a function of applied magnetic field. However, from structural studies alone, it is not possible to determine precisely the system anisotropy that governs the transitions between different structures. To address this question, here we report new small-angle neutron scattering measurements of both the VL structure at higher temperatures, and the field- and temperature-dependence of the VL form factor. Our measurements demonstrate how the influence of anisotropy on the VL, which in theory can be parameterized as nonlocal corrections, becomes progressively important with increasing magnetic field, and suppressed by increasing the temperature towards Tc. The data indicate that nonlocality due to different anisotropies play important roles in determining the VL properties.
  • From small-angle neutron scattering studies of the flux line lattice (FLL) in CeCoIn5, with magnetic field applied parallel to the crystal c-axis, we obtain the field- and temperature-dependence of the FLL form factor, which is a measure of the spatial variation of the field in the mixed state. We extend our earlier work [A.D. Bianchi et al. 2008 Science 319, 177] to temperatures up to 1250 mK. Over the entire temperature range, paramagnetism in the flux line cores results in an increase of the form factor with field. Near H_c2 the form factor decreases again, and our results indicate that this fall-off extends outside the proposed FFLO region. Instead, we attribute the decrease to a paramagnetic suppression of Cooper pairing. At higher temperatures, a gradual crossover towards more conventional mixed state behavior is observed.
  • We report on small-angle neutron scattering studies of the intrinsic vortex lattice (VL) structure in detwinned YBa2Cu3O7 at 2 K, and in fields up to 10.8 T. Because of the suppressed pinning to twin-domain boundaries, a new distorted hexagonal VL structure phase is stabilized at intermediate fields. It is separated from a low-field hexagonal phase of different orientation and distortion by a first-order transition at 2.0(2) T that is probably driven by Fermi surface effects. We argue that another first-order transition at 6.7(2) T, into a rhombic structure with a distortion of opposite sign, marks a crossover from a regime where Fermi surface anisotropy is dominant, to one where the VL structure and distortion is controlled by the order-parameter anisotropy.
  • We theoretically investigate the spontaneous emission process of an optical, dipolar emitter in metal-dielectric-metal slab and slot waveguide structures. We find that both structures exhibit strong off-resonant emission enhancements due to the tight confinement of modes between two metallic plates. The large enhancement of surface plasmon-polariton excitation enables dipole emission to be preferentially coupled into plasmon waveguide modes. These structures find applications in creating nanoscale local light sources or in generating guided single plasmons in integrated optical circuits.