• On September 25, 2014 Murray Gell-Mann was presented with the Helmholz Medal of the Berlin Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities in a ceremony at the Santa Fe Institute. The author, among others, was asked to speak for fifteen minutes on Murray and his accomplishments. The following is an edited transcription of the author's speaking text.
  • Feldbrugge, Lehners and Turok argue that large perturbations render the no-boundary proposal for the origin of the universe ill-defined (PRL 119, 171301 (2017) and PRD 97, 023509 (2018)). We refute this claim by evaluating the no-boundary path integral exactly in a Bianchi IX minisuperspace with two scale factors. In this model the no-boundary proposal can be implemented by requiring one scale factor to be zero initially together with a judiciously chosen regularity condition on the momentum conjugate to the second scale factor. Taking into account the non-linear backreaction of the perturbations we recover the predictions of the original semiclassical no-boundary proposal. In particular we find that large perturbations are strongly suppressed.
  • A brief remembrance of some aspects of the author's scientific interaction with Stephen Hawking contributed to Physics Today's March 14, 2018 article in which Stephen Hawking is remembered by his colleagues.
  • We sketch a quantum mechanical framework for the universe as a whole. Within that framework we propose a program for describing the ultimate origin in quantum cosmology of the quasiclassical domain of familiar experience and for characterizing the process of measurement. Predictions in quantum mechanics are made from probabilities for sets of alternative histories. Probabilities can be assigned only to sets of histories that approximately decohere. Decoherence is defined and the mechanism of decoherence is reviewed. Decoherence requires a sufficiently coarse-grained description of alternative histories of the universe. A quasiclassical domain consists of a branching set of alternative decohering histories, described by a coarse graining that is maximally refined consistent with decoherence, with individual branches that exhibit a high level of classical correlation in time. A quasiclassical domain is emergent in the universe as a consequence of the initial condition and the action function of the elementary particles. It is an important question whether all the quasiclassical domains are roughly equivalent or whether there are various essentially inequivalent ones. A measurement is a correlation with variables in a quasiclassical domain. An observer (or information gathering and utilizing system) is a complex adaptive system that has evolved to exploit the relative predictability of a quasiclassical domain. We suggest that resolution of many of the problems of interpretation presented by quantum mechanics is to be accomplished, not by further scrutiny of the subject as it applies to reproducible laboratory situations, but rather by an examination of alternative histories of the universe, stemming from its initial condition, and a study of the problem of quasiclassical domains.
  • A quantum theory of the universe consists of a theory of its quantum dynamics and a theory of its quantum state The theory predicts quantum multiverses in the form of decoherent sets of alternative histories describing the evolution of the universe's spacetime geometry and matter content. These consequences follow: (a) The universe generally exhibits different quantum multiverses at different levels and kinds of coarse graining. (b) Quantum multiverses are not a choice or an assumption but are consequences of the theory or not. (c) Quantum multiverses are generic for simple theories (d) Anthropic selection is automatic because observers are physical systems within the universe not somehow outside it. (e) Quantum multiverses can provide different mechanisms for the variation constants in effective theories (like the cosmological constant) enabling anthropic selection. (f) Different levels of coarse grained multiverses provide different routes to calculation as a consequence of decoherence. We support these conclusions by analyzing the quantum multiverses of a variety of quantum cosmological models aimed at the prediction of observable properties of our universe. In particular we show how the example of a multiverse consisting of a vast classical spacetime containing many pocket universes arises automatically as part of a quantum multiverse describing an eternally inflating false vacuum that decays by the quantum nucleation of true vacuum bubbles. In a FAQ we argue that the quantum multiverses of the universe are scientific, real, testable, falsifiable, and similar to those in other areas of science even if they are not directly observable on arbitrarily large scales.
  • It is shown that the standard no-boundary wave function has a natural expression in terms of a Lorentzian path integral with its contour defined by Picard-Lefschetz theory. The wave function is real, satisfies the Wheeler-DeWitt equation and predicts an ensemble of asymptotically classical, inflationary universes with nearly-Gaussian fluctuations and with a smooth semiclassical origin.
  • Einstein wrote memorably that `The eternally incomprehensible thing about the world is its comprehensibility.' This paper argues that the universe must be comprehensible at some level for information gathering and utilizing subsystems such as human observers to evolve and function.
  • This essay considers a model quantum universe consisting of a very large box containing a screen with two slits and an observer (us) that can pass though the slits. We apply the modern quantum mechanics of closed systems to calculate the probabilities for alternative histories of how we move through the universe and what we see. After passing through the screen with the slits, the quantum state of the universe is a superposition of classically distinguishable histories. We are then living in a superposition. Some frequently asked questions about such situations are answered using this model. The model's relationship to more realistic quantum cosmologies is briefly discussed.
  • We present a formulation of the decoherent (or consistent) histories quantum theory of closed systems starting with records of what histories happen. Alternative routes to a formulation of quantum theory like this one can be useful both for understanding quantum mechanics and for generalizing and extending it to new realms of application and experimental test.
  • These are the author's lectures at the 1992 Les Houches Summer School, "Gravitation and Quantizations". They develop a generalized sum-over-histories quantum mechanics for quantum cosmology that does not require either a preferred notion of time or a definition of measurement. The "post-Everett" quantum mechanics of closed systems is reviewed. Generalized quantum theories are defined by three elements (1) the set of fine-grained histories of the closed system which are its most refined possible description, (2) the allowed coarse grainings which are partitions of the fine-grained histories into classes, and (3) a decoherence functional which measures interference between coarse grained histories. Probabilities are assigned to sets of alternative coarse-grained histories that decohere as a consequence of the closed system's dynamics and initial condition. Generalized sum-over histories quantum theories are constructed for non-relativistic quantum mechanics, abelian gauge theories, a single relativistic world line, and for general relativity. For relativity the fine-grained histories are four-metrics and matter fields. Coarse grainings are four-dimensional diffeomorphism invariant partitions of these. The decoherence function is expressed in sum-over-histories form. The quantum mechanics of spacetime is thus expressed in fully spacetime form. The coarse-grainings are most general notion of alternative for quantum theory expressible in spacetime terms. Hamiltonian quantum mechanics of matter fields with its notion of unitarily evolving state on a spacelike surface is recovered as an approximation to this generalized quantum mechanics appropriate for those initial conditions and coarse-grainings such that spacetime geometry
  • Measurement is a fundamental notion in the usual approximate quantum mechanics of measured subsystems. Probabilities are predicted for the outcomes of measurements. State vectors evolve unitarily in between measurements and by reduction of the state vector at measurements. Probabilities are computed by summing the squares of amplitudes over alternatives which could have been measured but weren't. Measurements are limited by uncertainty principles and by other restrictions arising from the principles of quantum mechanics. This essay examines the extent to which those features of the quantum mechanics of measured subsystems that are explicitly tied to measurement situations are incorporated or modified in the more general quantum mechanics of closed systems in which measurement is not a fundamental notion. There, probabilities are predicted for decohering sets of alternative time histories of the closed system, whether or not they represent a measurement situation. Reduction of the state vector is a necessary part of the description of such histories. Uncertainty principles limit the possible alternatives at one time from which histories may be constructed. Models of measurement situations are exhibited within the quantum mechanics of the closed system containing both measured subsystem and measuring apparatus. Limitations are derived on the existence of records for the outcomes of measurements when the initial density matrix of the closed system is highly impure. (Festschrift for Dieter Brill).
  • Feynman's sum-over-histories formulation of quantum mechanics is reviewed as an independent statement of quantum theory in spacetime form. It is different from the usual Schr\"odinger-Heisenberg formulation that utilizes states on spacelike surfaces because it assigns probabilities to different sets of alternatives. Sum-over-histories quantum mechanics can be generalized to deal with spacetime alternatives that are not "at definite moments of time". An example in field theory is the set of alternative ranges of values of a field averaged over a spacetime region. An example in particle mechanics is the set of the alternatives defined by whether a particle never crosses a fixed spacetime region or crosses it at least once. The general notion of a set of spacetime alternatives is a partition (coarse-graining) of the histories into an exhaustive set of exclusive classes. With this generalization the sum-over-histories formulation can be said to be in fully spacetime form with dynamics represented by path integrals over spacetime histories and alternatives defined as spacetime partitions of these histories. When restricted to alternatives at definite moments of times this generalization is equivalent to Schr\"odinger-Heisenberg quantum mechanics. However, the quantum mechanics of more general spacetime alternatives does not have an equivalent Schr\"odinger-Heisenberg formulation. We suggest that, in the quantum theory of gravity, the general notion of "observable" is supplied by diffeomorphism invariant partitions of spacetime metrics and matter field configurations. By generalizing the usual alternatives so as to put quantum theory in fully spacetime form we may be led to a covariant generalized quantum mechanics of spacetime free from the problem of time.
  • The origin of the phenomenological deterministic laws that approximately govern the quasiclassical domain of familiar experience is considered in the context of the quantum mechanics of closed systems such as the universe as a whole. We investigate the requirements for coarse grainings to yield decoherent sets of histories that are quasiclassical, i.e. such that the individual histories obey, with high probability, effective classical equations of motion interrupted continually by small fluctuations and occasionally by large ones. We discuss these requirements generally but study them specifically for coarse grainings of the type that follows a distinguished subset of a complete set of variables while ignoring the rest. More coarse graining is needed to achieve decoherence than would be suggested by naive arguments based on the uncertainty principle. Even coarser graining is required in the distinguished variables for them to have the necessary inertia to approach classical predictability in the presence of the noise consisting of the fluctuations that typical mechanisms of decoherence produce. We describe the derivation of phenomenological equations of motion explicitly for a particular class of models. Probabilities of the correlations in time that define equations of motion are explicitly considered. Fully non-linear cases are studied. Methods are exhibited for finding the form of the phenomenological equations of motion even when these are only distantly related to those of the fundamental action. The demonstration of the connection between quantum-mechanical causality and causalty in classical phenomenological equations of motion is generalized. The connections among decoherence, noise, dissipation, and the amount of coarse graining necessary to achieve classical predictability are investigated quantitatively.
  • Three ideas are introduced that when brought together characterize the realistic quasiclassical realms of our quantum universe as particular kinds of sets of alternative coarse-grained histories defined by quasiclassical variables: (1) Branch dependent adaptive coarse grainings that can be close to maximally refined and can simplify calculation. (2) Narrative coarse grainings that describe how features of the universe change over time and allow the construction of an environment. (3) A notion of strong decoherence that characterizes realistic mechanisms of decoherence.
  • Usual quantum mechanics requires a fixed, background, spacetime geometry and its associated causal structure. A generalization of the usual theory may therefore be needed at the Planck scale for quantum theories of gravity in which spacetime geometry is a quantum variable. The elements of generalized quantum theory are briefly reviewed and illustrated by generalizations of usual quantum theory that incorporate spacetime alternatives, gauge degrees of freedom, and histories that move forward and backward in time. A generalized quantum framework for cosmological spacetime geometry is sketched. This theory is in fully four-dimensional form and free from the need for a fixed causal structure. Usual quantum mechanics is recovered as an approximation to this more general framework that is appropriate in those situations where spacetime geometry behaves classically. (Talk given at the Workshop on Physics at the Planck Scale, Puri, India, December12-21, 1994. This talk is a precis of the author's 1992 Les Houches Lectures: Spacetime Quantum Mechanics and the Quantum Mechanics of Spacetime, gr-qc/9304006).
  • The evolution of the universe is determined by its quantum state. The wave function of the universe obeys the constraints of general relativity and in particular the Wheeler-DeWitt equation (WDWE). For non-zero \Lambda, we show that solutions of the WDWE at large volume have two domains in which geometries and fields are asymptotically real. In one the histories are Euclidean asymptotically anti-de Sitter, in the other they are Lorentzian asymptotically classical de Sitter. Further, the universal complex semiclassical asymptotic structure of solutions of the WDWE implies that the leading order in \hbar quantum probabilities for classical, asymptotically de Sitter histories can be obtained from the action of asymptotically anti-de Sitter configurations. This leads to a promising, universal connection between quantum cosmology and holography.
  • We extend the holographic formulation of the semiclassical no-boundary wave function (NBWF) to models with Maxwell vector fields. It is shown that the familiar saddle points of the NBWF have a representation in which a regular, Euclidean asymptotic AdS geometry smoothly joins onto a Lorentzian asymptotically de Sitter universe through a complex transition region. The tree level probabilities of Lorentzian histories are fully specified by the action of the AdS region of the saddle points. The scalar and vector matter profiles in this region are complex from an AdS viewpoint, with universal asymptotic phases. The dual description of the semiclassical NBWF thus involves complex deformations of Euclidean CFTs.
  • The familiar textbook quantum mechanics of laboratory measurements incorporates a quantum mechanical arrow of time --- the direction in time in which state vector reduction operates. This arrow is usually assumed to coincide with the direction of the thermodynamic arrow of the quasiclassical realm of everyday experience. But in the more general context of cosmology we seek an explanation of all observed arrows, and the relations between them, in terms of the conditions that specify our particular universe. This paper investigates quantum mechanical and thermodynamic arrows in a time-neutral formulation of quantum mechanics for a number of model cosmologies in fixed background spacetimes. We find that a general universe may not have well defined arrows of either kind. When arrows are emergent they need not point in the same direction over the whole of spacetime. Rather they may be local, pointing in different directions in different spacetime regions. Local arrows can therefore be consistent with global time symmetry.
  • Wave functions specifying a quantum state of the universe must satisfy the constraints of general relativity, in particular the Wheeler-DeWitt equation (WDWE). We show for a wide class of models with non-zero cosmological constant that solutions of the WDWE exhibit a universal semiclassical asymptotic structure for large spatial volumes. A consequence of this asymptotic structure is that a wave function in a gravitational theory with a negative cosmological constant can predict an ensemble of asymptotically classical histories which expand with a positive effective cosmological constant. This raises the possibility that even fundamental theories with a negative cosmological constant can be consistent with our low-energy observations of a classical, accelerating universe. We illustrate this general framework with the specific example of the no-boundary wave function in its holographic form. The implications of these results for model building in string cosmology are discussed.
  • Decoherent histories quantum theory is reformulated with the assumption that there is one "real" fine-grained history, specified in a preferred complete set of sum-over-histories variables. This real history is described by embedding it in an ensemble of comparable imagined fine-grained histories, not unlike the familiar ensemble of statistical mechanics. These histories are assigned extended probabilities, which can sometimes be negative or greater than one. As we will show, this construction implies that the real history is not completely accessible to experimental or other observational discovery. However, sufficiently and appropriately coarse-grained sets of alternative histories have standard probabilities providing information about the real fine-grained history that can be compared with observation. We recover the probabilities of decoherent histories quantum mechanics for sets of histories that are recorded and therefore decohere. Quantum mechanics can be viewed as a classical stochastic theory of histories with extended probabilities and a well-defined notion of reality common to all decoherent sets of alternative coarse-grained histories.
  • The most striking observable feature of our indeterministic quantum universe is the wide range of time, place, and scale on which the deterministic laws of classical physics hold to an excellent approximation. This essay describes how this domain of classical predictability of every day experience emerges from a quantum theory of the universe's state and dynamics.
  • The quantum mechanics of closed systems such as the universe is formulated using an extension of familiar probability theory that incorporates negative probabilities. Probabilities must be positive for sets of alternative histories that are the basis of fair settleable bets. However, in quantum mechanics there are sets of alternative histories that can be described but which cannot be the basis for fair settleable bets. Members of such sets can be assigned extended probabilities that are sometimes negative. A prescription for extended probabilities is introduced that assigns extended probabilities to all histories that can be described, fine grained or coarse grained, members of decoherent sets or not. All probability sum rules are satisfied exactly. Sets of histories that are recorded to sufficient precision are the basis of settleable bets. This formulation is compared with the decoherent (consistent) histories formulation of quantum theory. Prospects are discussed for using this formulation to provide testable alternatives to quantum theory or further generalizations of it.
  • We consider the no-boundary proposal for homogeneous isotropic closed universes with a cosmological constant and a scalar field with a quadratic potential. In the semi-classical limit, it predicts classical behavior at late times if the initial scalar field is more than a certain minimum. If the classical late time histories are extended back, they may be singular or bounce at a finite radius. The no-boundary proposal provides a probability measure on the classical solutions which selects inflationary histories but is heavily biased towards small amounts of inflation. This would not be compatible with observations. However we argue that the probability for a homogeneous universe should be multiplied by exp(3N) where N is the number of e-foldings of slow roll inflation to obtain the probability for what we observe in our past light cone. This volume weighting is similar to that in eternal inflation. In a landscape potential, it would predict that the universe would have a large amount of inflation and that it would start in an approximately de Sitter state near a saddle-point of the potential. The universe would then have always been in the semi-classical regime.
  • We analyze the origin of the quasiclassical realm from the no-boundary proposal for the universe's quantum state in a class of minisuperspace models. The models assume homogeneous, isotropic, closed spacetime geometries, a single scalar field moving in a quadratic potential, and a fundamental cosmological constant. The allowed classical histories and their probabilities are calculated to leading semiclassical order. We find that for the most realistic range of parameters analyzed a minimum amount of scalar field is required, if there is any at all, in order for the universe to behave classically at late times. If the classical late time histories are extended back, they may be singular or bounce at a finite radius. The ensemble of classical histories is time symmetric although individual histories are generally not. The no-boundary proposal selects inflationary histories, but the measure on the classical solutions it provides is heavily biased towards small amounts of inflation. However, the probability for a large number of efoldings is enhanced by the volume factor needed to obtain the probability for what we observe in our past light cone, given our present age. Our results emphasize that it is the quantum state of the universe that determines whether or not it exhibits a quasiclassical realm and what histories are possible or probable within that realm.
  • In this universe, governed fundamentally by quantum mechanical laws, characterized by indeterminism and distributed probabilities, classical deterministic laws are applicable over a wide range of time, place, and scale. We review the origin of these laws in the context of the quantum mechanics of closed systems, most generally, the universe as a whole. There probabilities are predicted for members of decoherent sets of alternative histories of the universe, ie ones for which the interference between pairs in the set is negligible as measured by a decoherence functional. An expansion of the decoherence functional in the separation between histories allows the form of the deterministic equations of motion to be derived for suitable coarse grainings of a class of non-relativistic systems, including ones with general non-linear interactions. More coarse graining is needed to achieve classical predictability than naive arguments based on the uncertainty principle would suggest. Coarse graining is needed for decoherence, and coarse graining beyond that for the inertia necessary to resist the noise that mechanisms of decoherence produce. Sets of histories governed largely by deterministic laws constitute the quasiclassical realm of everyday experience which is an emergent feature of the closed system's initial condition and Hamiltonian. We analyse the sensitivity of the existence of a quasiclassical realm to the particular form of the initial condition. We find that almost any initial condition will exhibit a quasiclassical realm of some sort, but only a small fraction of the total number of possible initial states could reproduce the everyday quasiclassical realm of our universe. (Talk given at the Lanczos Centenary Conference, North Carolina State University, December 15, 1993.)