• Post starburst E+A galaxies show indications of a powerful starburst that was quenched abruptly. Their disturbed, bulge-dominated morphologies suggest that they are merger remnants. The more massive E+A galaxies are suggested to be quenched by AGN feedback, yet little is known about AGN-driven winds in this short-lived phase. We present spatially-resolved IFU spectroscopy by the Keck Cosmic Web Imager of SDSS J003443.68+251020.9, at z=0.118. The system consists of two galaxies, the larger of which is a post starburst E+A galaxy hosting an AGN. Our modelling suggests a 400 Myrs starburst, with a peak star formation rate of 120 Msun/yr. The observations reveal stationary and outflowing gas, photoionized by the central AGN. We detect gas outflows to a distance of 17 kpc from the central galaxy, far beyond the region of the stars (about 3 kpc), inside a conic structure with an opening angle of 70 degrees. We construct self-consistent photoionization and dynamical models for the different gas components and show that the gas outside the galaxy forms a continuous flow, with a mass outflow rate of about 24 Msun/yr. The gas mass in the flow, roughly $10^9$ Msun, is larger than the total gas mass within the galaxy, some of which is outflowing too. The continuity of the flow puts a lower limit of 60 Myrs on the duration of the AGN feedback. Such AGN are capable of removing, in a single episode, most of the gas from their host galaxies and expelling enriched material into the surrounding CGM.
  • Enormous Ly$\alpha$ nebulae (ELANe) represent the extrema of Ly$\alpha$ nebulosities. They have detected extents of $>200$ kpc in Ly$\alpha$ and Ly$\alpha$ luminosities $>10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The ELAN population is an ideal laboratory to study the interactions between galaxies and the intergalactic/circumgalactic medium (IGM/CGM) given their brightness and sizes. The current sample size of ELANe is still very small, and the few $z\approx2$ ELANe discovered to date are all associated with local overdensities of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Inspired by these results, we have initiated a survey of ELANe associated with QSO pairs using the Palomar and Keck Cosmic Web Imagers (PCWI/KCWI). In this letter, we present our first result: the discovery of ELAN0101+0201 associated with a QSO pair at $z=2.45$. Our PCWI discovery data shows that, above a 2-$\sigma$ surface brightness of $1.2\times10^{-17}$ \sbunit, the end-to-end size of ELAN0101+0201 is $\gtrsim 232$ kpc. We have conducted follow-up observations using KCWI, resolving multiple Ly$\alpha$ emitting sources within the rectangular field-of-view of $\approx 130\times165$ projected kpc$^2$, and obtaining their emission line profiles at high signal-to-noise ratios. Combining both KCWI and PCWI, our observations confirm that ELAN0101+0201 resides in an extremely overdense environment. Our observations further support that a large amount of cool ($T\sim10^4$K) gas could exist in massive halos (M$\gtrsim10^{13}$M$_\odot$) at $z\approx2$. Future observations on a larger sample of similar systems will provide statistics of how cool gas is distributed in massive overdensities at high-redshift and strongly constrain the evolution of the intracluster medium (ICM).
  • Current time domain facilities are finding several hundreds of transient astronomical events a year. The discovery rate is expected to increase in the future as soon as new surveys such as the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) and the Large Synoptic Sky Survey (LSST) come on line. At the present time, the rate at which transients are classified is approximately one order or magnitude lower than the discovery rate, leading to an increasing "follow-up drought". Existing telescopes with moderate aperture can help address this deficit when equipped with spectrographs optimized for spectral classification. Here, we provide an overview of the design, operations and first results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Machine (SEDM), operating on the Palomar 60-inch telescope (P60). The instrument is optimized for classification and high observing efficiency. It combines a low-resolution (R$\sim$100) integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph with "Rainbow Camera" (RC), a multi-band field acquisition camera which also serves as multi-band (ugri) photometer. The SEDM was commissioned during the operation of the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) and has already proved lived up to its promise. The success of the SEDM demonstrates the value of spectrographs optimized to spectral classification. Introduction of similar spectrographs on existing telescopes will help alleviate the follow-up drought and thereby accelerate the rate of discoveries.
  • We provide evidence that UGC1382, long believed to be a passive elliptical galaxy, is actually a giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxy which rivals the archetypical GLSB Malin 1 in size. Like other GLSB galaxies, it has two components: a high surface brightness disk galaxy surrounded by an extended low surface brightness (LSB) disk. For UGC1382, the central component is a lenticular system with an effective radius of 6 kpc. Beyond this, the LSB disk has an effective radius of ~38 kpc and an extrapolated central surface brightness of ~26 mag/arcsec^2. Both components have a combined stellar mass of ~8x10^10 M_sun, and are embedded in a massive (10^10 M_sun) low-density (<3 M_sun/pc^2) HI disk with a radius of 110 kpc, making this one of the largest isolated disk galaxies known. The system resides in a massive dark matter halo of at least 2x10^12 M_sun. Although possibly part of a small group, its low density environment likely plays a role in the formation and retention of the giant LSB and HI disks. We model the spectral energy distributions and find that the LSB disk is likely older than the lenticular component. UGC1382 has UV-optical colors typical of galaxies transitioning through the green valley. Within the LSB disk are spiral arms forming stars at extremely low efficiencies. The gas depletion time scale of ~10^11 yr suggests that UGC1382 may be a very long term resident of the green valley. We find that the formation and evolution of the LSB disk is best explained by the accretion of gas-rich LSB dwarf galaxies.
  • We report observations of a deep near-ultraviolet (NUV) survey of the Kepler field made in 2012 with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Complete All-Sky UV Survey Extension (CAUSE). The GALEX-CAUSE Kepler survey (GCK) covers 104 square degrees of the Kepler field and reaches limiting magnitude NUV=22.6 at 3{\sigma}. Analysis of the GCK survey has yielded a catalog of 669,928 NUV sources, of which 475,164 are cross-matched with stars in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). Approximately 327 of 451 confirmed exoplanet host stars and 2614 of 4696 candidate exoplanet host stars identified by Kepler have NUV photometry in the GCK survey. The GCK catalog should enable the identification and characterization of UV-excess stars in the Kepler field (young solar-type and low-mass stars, chromospherically active binaries, white dwarfs, horizontal branch stars, etc.), and elucidation of various astrophysics problems related to the stars and planetary systems in the Kepler field.
  • The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at mid-infrared wavelengths 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 microns. The mission was primarily designed to extract point sources, leaving resolved and extended sources unexplored. We have begun a dedicated WISE Enhanced Resolution Galaxy Atlas (WERGA) project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalogue. Here we demonstrate the first results of the project for a sample of 17 galaxies, chosen to be of large angular size, diverse morphology, color, stellar mass and star formation. It includes many well-studied galaxies, such as M51, M81, M83, M87, M101, IC342. Photometry and surface brightness decomposition is carried out after special super-resolution processing, achieving spatial fidelity similar to that of Spitzer-IRAC. We present WISE, Spitzer and GALEX photometric and characterization measurements, combining the measurements to study the global properties. We derive star formation rates using the PAH-sensitive 12 micron (W3) fluxes, warm-dust sensitive 22 micron (W4) fluxes, and young massive-star sensitive UV fluxes. Stellar masses are estimated using the 3.4 micron (W1) and 4.6 micron (W2) measurements that trace the dominant stellar mass content. We highlight and showcase the detailed results of M83, comparing the infrared results with the ATCA HI gas distribution and GALEX UV emission, tracing the evolution from gas to stars. In addition to the enhanced images, WISE all-sky coverage provides a tremendous advantage over Spitzer for building a complete nearby galaxy catalog, tracing both stellar mass and star formation histories. We discuss the construction of a complete mid-infrared catalog of galaxies and its complementary role to study the assembly and evolution of galaxies in the local universe.
  • We present a clustering analysis of near ultraviolet (NUV) - optical color selected luminosity bin samples of green valley galaxies. These galaxy samples are constructed by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 with the latest Galaxy Evolution Explorer source catalog which provides NUV photometry. We present cross-correlation function measurements and determine the halo occupation distribution of these transitional galaxies using a new multiple tracer analysis technique. We extend the halo-occupation formalism to model the cross-correlation function between a galaxy sample of interest and multiple tracer populations simultaneously. This method can be applied to commonly used luminosity threshold samples as well as to color and luminosity bin selected galaxy samples, and improves the accuracy of clustering analyses for sparse galaxy populations. We confirm the previously observed trend that red galaxies reside in more massive halos and are more likely to be satellite galaxies than average galaxies of similar luminosity. While the change in central galaxy host mass as a function of color is only weakly constrained, the satellite fraction and characteristic halo masses of green satellite galaxies are found to be intermediate between those of blue and red satellite galaxies.
  • We are systematically surveying all known and suspected Z Cam-type dwarf novae for classical nova shells. This survey is motivated by the discovery of the largest known classical nova shell, which surrounds the archetypal dwarf nova Z Camelopardalis. The Z Cam shell demonstrates that at least some dwarf novae must have undergone classical nova eruptions in the past, and that at least some classical novae become dwarf novae long after their nova thermonuclear outbursts, in accord with the hibernation scenario of cataclysmic binaries. Here we report the detection of a fragmented "shell", 3 arcmin in diameter, surrounding the dwarf nova AT Cancri. This second discovery demonstrates that nova shells surrounding Z Cam-type dwarf novae cannot be very rare. The shell geometry is suggestive of bipolar, conical ejection seen nearly pole-on. A spectrum of the brightest AT Cnc shell knot is similar to that of the ejecta of the classical nova GK Per, and of Z Cam, dominated by [NII] emission. Galex FUV imagery reveals a similar-sized, FUV-emitting shell. We determine a distance of 460 pc to AT Cnc, and an upper limit to its ejecta mass of ~ 5 x 10^{-5} Msun, typical of classical novae.
  • After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 {\mu}m, 4.6 {\mu}m, 12 {\mu}m and 22 {\mu}m. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas (WHRGA) project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalogue. Here we summarize the deconvolution technique used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE super-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, GALEX and ground-based imaging. The is the first paper in a two part series; results for a much larger sample of nearby galaxies is presented in the second paper.
  • The dwarf nova Z Camelopardalis is surrounded by the largest known classical nova shell. This shell demonstrates that at least some dwarf novae must have undergone classical nova eruptions in the past, and that at least some classical novae become dwarf novae long after their nova thermonuclear outbursts. The current size of the shell, its known distance, and the largest observed nova ejection velocity set a lower limit to the time since Z Cam's last outburst of 220 years. The brightest part of the Z Cam shell's radius is currently p ~ 1690 pixels. No expansion of the radius of the brightest part of the ejecta was detected, with an upper limit of pdot < 1 pixel/3 years. This suggests that the last Z Cam eruption occurred p/pdot > 5,000 years ago. However, including the important effect of deceleration as the ejecta sweeps up interstellar matter in its snowplow phase reduces the lower limit to 1300 years. This is the first strong test of the prediction of nova thermonuclear runaway theory that the inter-outburst times of classical novae are longer than 1000 yr. The intriguing suggestion that Z Cam was a bright nova, recorded by Chinese imperial astrologers in October - November 77 BCE, is consistent with our measurements. If Z Cam was indeed the nova of 77 BCE we predict that its ejecta are currently expanding at 85 km/s, or 0.11 arcsec/yr. Detection and measurement of this rate of expansion are doable in just a few years.
  • We present optical light curves of twenty-nine novae in M31 during the 2009 and 2010 observing seasons of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The dynamic and rapid cadences in PTF monitoring of M31, from one day to even ten minutes, provide excellent temporal coverage of nova light curves, enabling us to record the photometric evolution of M31 novae in unprecedented detail. We also detect eight of these novae in the near ultraviolet (UV) band with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite. Novae M31N2009-10b and 2010-11a show prominent UV emission peaking a few days prior to their optical maxima, possibly implying aspherical outbursts. Additionally, our blue-shifted spectrum of the recent outburst of PT And (M31N2010-12a) indicates that it is a recurrent nova in M31 and not a dwarf nova in the Milky Way as was previously assumed. Finally, we systematically searched for novae in all confirmed globular clusters of M31 and found only M31N 2010-10f associated with Bol 126. The specific nova rate in the M31 globular cluster system is thus about one per year which is not enhanced relative to the rate outside the globular cluster system.
  • Binarity is believed to dramatically affect the history and geometry of mass loss in AGB and post-AGB stars, but observational evidence of binarity is sorely lacking. As part of a project to look for hot binary companions to cool AGB stars using the GALEX archive, we have discovered a late-M star, Y Gem, to be a source of strong and variable UV emission. Y Gem is a prime example of the success of our technique of UV imaging of AGB stars in order to search for binary companions. Y Gem's large and variable UV flux makes it one of the most prominent examples of a late AGB star with a mass accreting binary companion. The UV emission is most likely due to emission associated with accretion activity and a disk around a main-sequence companion star. The physical mechanism generating the UV emission is extremely energetic, with an integrated luminosity of a few L(sun) at its peak. We also find weak CO J=2-1 emission from Y Gem with a very narrow line profile (FWHM of 3.4 km/s). Such a narrow line is unlikely to arise in an outflow, and is consistent with emission from an orbiting, molecular reservoir of radius 300 AU. Y Gem may be the progenitor of the class of post-AGB stars which are binaries and possess disks but no outflows.
  • We report on the discovery and observations of the extremely luminous optical transient CSS100217:102913+404220 (CSS100217 hereafter). Spectroscopic observations show this transient was coincident with a galaxy at redshift z=0.147, and reached an apparent magnitude of V ~ 16.3. After correcting for foreground Galactic extinction we determine the absolute magnitude to be M_V =-22.7 approximately 45 days after maximum light. Based on our unfiltered optical photometry the peak optical emission was L = 1.3 x 10^45 erg s^-1, and over a period of 287 rest-frame days had an integrated bolometric luminosity of 1.2 x 10^52 erg. Analysis of the pre-outburst SDSS spectrum of the source shows features consistent with a Narrow-line Seyfert1 (NLS1) galaxy. High-resolution HST and Keck followup observations show the event occurred within 150pc of nucleus of the galaxy, suggesting a possible link to the active nuclear region. However, the rapid outburst along with photometric and spectroscopic evolution are much more consistent with a luminous supernova. Line diagnostics suggest that the host galaxy is undergoing significant star formation. We use extensive follow-up of the event along with archival CSS and SDSS data to investigate the three most likely sources of such an event; 1) an extremely luminous supernova; 2) the tidal disruption of a star by the massive nuclear black hole; 3) variability of the central AGN. We find that CSS100217 was likely an extremely luminous type IIn supernova that occurred within range of the narrow-line region of an AGN. We discuss how similar events may have been missed in past supernova surveys because of confusion with AGN activity.
  • The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is systematically charting the optical transient and variable sky. A primary science driver of PTF is building a complete inventory of transients in the local Universe (distance less than 200 Mpc). Here, we report the discovery of PTF10fqs, a transient in the luminosity "gap" between novae and supernovae. Located on a spiral arm of Messier 99, PTF 10fqs has a peak luminosity of Mr = -12.3, red color (g-r = 1.0) and is slowly evolving (decayed by 1 mag in 68 days). It has a spectrum dominated by intermediate-width H (930 km/s) and narrow calcium emission lines. The explosion signature (the light curve and spectra) is overall similar to thatof M85OT2006-1, SN2008S, and NGC300OT. The origin of these events is shrouded in mystery and controversy (and in some cases, in dust). PTF10fqs shows some evidence of a broad feature (around 8600A) that may suggest very large velocities (10,000 km/s) in this explosion. Ongoing surveys can be expected to find a few such events per year. Sensitive spectroscopy, infrared monitoring and statistics (e.g. disk versus bulge) will eventually make it possible for astronomers to unravel the nature of these mysterious explosions.
  • The supernova SN 2005cz has recently attracted some attention, due to the fact that it was spectroscopically similar to type Ib supernovae (SNe), a class that is presumed to result from core-collapse of massive stars, yet it occurred in an elliptical galaxy, where one expects very few massive stars to exist. Two explanations for this remarkable event were put forward. Perets et al. (2010) associate SN 2005cz with the class of Ca-rich, faint SNe Ib, which likely result from old double-white-dwarf systems with a He-rich secondary. On the other hand, Kawabata et al. (2010) suggest that SN 2005cz is indeed a core-collapse event (in a binary system), albeit of a star at the lower end of the mass range, 10-12 M_Sun. The existence of this star in its elliptical host is explained as resulting from low-level star formation (SF) activity in that galaxy. Here we present extensive observations of the location of SN 2005cz, sensitive to a variety of SF tracers, including optical spectroscopy, H_alpha emission, UV emission and HST photometry. We show that NGC 4589, the host galaxy of SN 2005cz, does not show any signatures of a young stellar population or recent SF activity either close to or far from the location of SN 2005cz.
  • Using archival observations recorded over a 5+ year timeframe with the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite, we present a study of the ultraviolet (UV) variability of 4360 quasars of redshifts up to z=2.5 that have optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR5 spectroscopic catalog. The observed changes in both the far UV (FUV: 1350-1785A) and near UV (NUV: 1770-2830A) AB magnitudes as a function of time may help differentiate between models of the emission mechanisms thought to operate in these active galaxies. A list of NUV and FUV variable quasars was derived from the UV light-curves of sources with 5 or more observational visits by GALEX that spanned a time-frame greater than 3 months. By measuring the error in the derived mean UV magnitude from the series of GALEX observations for each source, quasars whose UV variability was greater than the 3-sigma variance from the mean observed value were deemed to be (intrinsically) UV variable. This conservative selection criterion (which was applied to both FUV and NUV observations) resulted in identifying 550 NUV and 371 FUV quasars as being statistically significant UV variable objects.
  • We present a new analysis of the dust obscuration in starburst galaxies at low and high redshift. This study is motivated by our unique sample of the most extreme UV-selected starburst galaxies in the nearby universe (z<0.3), found to be good analogs of high-redshift Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) in most of their physical properties. We find that the dust properties of the Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs) are consistent with the relation derived previously by Meurer et al. (M99) that is commonly used to dust-correct star formation rate measurements at a very wide range of redshifts. We directly compare our results with high redshift samples (LBGs, BzK, and sub-mm galaxies at z=2-3) having IR data either from Spitzer or Herschel. The attenuation in typical LBGs at z=2-3 and LBAs is very similar. Because LBAs are much better analogs to LBGs compared to previous local star-forming samples, including M99, the practice of dust-correcting the SFRs of high redshift galaxies based on the local calibration is now placed on a much more solid ground. We illustrate the importance of this result by showing how the locally calibrated relation between UV measurements and extinction is used to estimate the integrated, dust-corrected star formation rate density at z=2-6.
  • We use GALEX ultraviolet (UV) and optical integrated photometry of the hosts of seventeen luminous supernovae (LSNe, having peak M_V < -21) and compare them to a sample of 26,000 galaxies from a cross-match between the SDSS DR4 spectral catalog and GALEX interim release 1.1. We place the LSNe hosts on the galaxy NUV-r versus M_r color magnitude diagram (CMD) with the larger sample to illustrate how extreme they are. The LSN hosts appear to favor low-density regions of the galaxy CMD falling on the blue edge of the blue cloud toward the low luminosity end. From the UV-optical photometry, we estimate the star formation history of the LSN hosts. The hosts have moderately low star formation rates (SFRs) and low stellar masses (M_*) resulting in high specific star formation rates (sSFR). Compared with the larger sample, the LSN hosts occupy low-density regions of a diagram plotting sSFR versus M_* in the area having higher sSFR and lower M_*. This preference for low M_*, high sSFR hosts implies the LSNe are produced by an effect having to do with their local environment. The correlation of mass with metallicity suggests that perhaps wind-driven mass loss is the factor that prevents LSNe from arising in higher-mass, higher-metallicity hosts. The massive progenitors of the LSNe (>100 M_sun), by appearing in low-SFR hosts, are potential tests for theories of the initial mass function that limit the maximum mass of a star based on the SFR.
  • Supernovae arise from progenitor stars occupying the upper end of the initial mass function. Their extreme brightness allows individual massive stars to be detected at cosmic distances, lending supernovae great potential as tracers of the upper end of the IMF and its evolution. Exploiting this potential requires progress in many areas of supernova science. These include understanding the progenitor masses that produce various types of supernovae and accurately characterizing the supernova outburst and the environment in which it was produced. I present some preliminary work identifying the environmental conditions that produce the most luminous supernovae, believed to arise from stars with masses greater than 100 M_sun. I illustrate that the presence of these extreme supernovae in small star-forming dwarfs can be used to test our understanding of the upper end of the IMF.
  • Galaxy Evolution Explorer observations of IC 3418, a low surface brightness galaxy in the Virgo Cluster, revealed a striking 17 kpc UV tail of bright knots and diffuse emission. H alpha imaging confirms that star formation is ongoing in the tail. IC 3418 was likely recently ram pressure stripped on its first pass through Virgo. We suggest that star formation is occurring in molecular clouds that formed in IC 3418's turbulent stripped wake. Tides and ram pressure stripping (RPS) of molecular clouds are both disfavored as tail formation mechanisms. The tail is similar to the few other observed star-forming tails, all of which likely formed during RPS. The tails' morphologies reflect the forces present during their formation and can be used to test for dynamical coupling between molecular and diffuse gas, thereby probing the origin of the star forming molecular gas.
  • We use multi-wavelength, matched aperture, integrated photometry from GALEX, SDSS and the RC3 to estimate the physical properties of 166 nearby galaxies hosting 168 well-observed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Our data corroborate well-known features that have been seen in other SN Ia samples. Specifically, hosts with active star formation produce brighter and slower SNe Ia on average, and hosts with luminosity-weighted ages older than 1 Gyr produce on average more faint, fast and fewer bright, slow SNe Ia than younger hosts. New results include that in our sample, the faintest and fastest SNe Ia occur only in galaxies exceeding a stellar mass threshhold of ~10^10 M_sun, indicating that their progenitors must arise in populations that are older and/or more metal rich than the general SN Ia population. A low host extinction sub-sample hints at a residual trend in peak luminosity with host age, after correcting for light-curve shape, giving the appearance that older hosts produce less-extincted SNe Ia on average. This has implications for cosmological fitting of SNe Ia and suggests that host age could be useful as a parameter in the fitting. Converting host mass to metallicity and computing 56Ni mass from the supernova light curves, we find that our local sample is consistent with a model that predicts a shallow trend between stellar metallicity and the 56Ni mass that powers the explosion, but we cannot rule out the absence of a trend. We measure a correlation between 56Ni mass and host age in the local universe that is shallower and not as significant as that seen at higher redshifts. The details of the age -- 56Ni mass correlations at low and higher redshift imply a luminosity-weighted age threshhold of ~3 Gyr for SN Ia hosts, above which they are less likely to produce SNe Ia with 56Ni masses above ~0.5 M_sun. (Abridged)
  • We investigate the nature of the star formation law at low gas surface densities using a sample of 19 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies with existing HI maps in the literature, UV imaging from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, and optical images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. All of the LSB galaxies have (NUV-r) colors similar to those for higher surface brightness star-forming galaxies of similar luminosity indicating that their average star formation histories are not very different. Based upon four LSB galaxies with both UV and FIR data, we find FIR/UV ratios significantly less than one, implying low amounts of internal UV extinction in LSB galaxies. We use the UV images and HI maps to measure the star formation rate and hydrogen gas surface densities within the same region for all of the galaxies. The LSB galaxy star formation rate surface densities lie below the extrapolation of the power law fit to the star formation rate surface density as a function of the total gas density for higher surface brightness galaxies. Although there is more scatter, the LSB galaxies also lie below a second version of the star formation law in which the star formation rate surface density is correlated with the gas density divided by the orbital time in the disk. The downturn seen in both star formation laws is consistent with theoretical models that predict lower star formation efficiencies in LSB galaxies due to the declining molecular fraction with decreasing density.
  • - Constraining the cosmological parameters and understanding Dark Energy have tremendous implications for the nature of the Universe and its physical laws. - The pervasive limit of systematic uncertainties reached by cosmography based on Cepheids and Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) warrants a search for complementary approaches. - Type II SNe have been shown to offer such a path. Their distances can be well constrained by luminosity-based or geometric methods. Competing, complementary, and concerted efforts are underway, to explore and exploit those objects that are extremely well matched to next generation facilities. Spectroscopic follow-up will be enabled by space- based and 20-40 meter class telescopes. - Some systematic uncertainties of Type II SNe, such as reddening by dust and metallicity effects, are bound to be different from those of SNe Ia. Their stellar progenitors are known, promising better leverage on cosmic evolution. In addition, their rate - which closely tracks the ongoing star formation rate - is expected to rise significantly with look- back time, ensuring an adequate supply of distant examples. - These data will competitively constrain the dark energy equation of state, allow the determination of the Hubble constant to 5%, and promote our understanding of the processes involved in the last dramatic phases of massive stellar evolution.
  • We report the serendipitous detection by GALEX of fast (<1 day) rising (>1 mag) UV emission from two Type II plateau (II-P) supernovae (SNe) at z=0.185 and 0.324 discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey. Optical photometry and VLT spectroscopy 2 weeks after the GALEX detections link the onset of UV emission to the time of shock breakout. Using radiation hydrodynamics and non-LTE radiative transfer simulations, and starting from a standard red supergiant (RSG; Type II-P SN progenitor) star evolved self-consistently from the main sequence to iron core collapse, we model the shock breakout phase and the 55 hr that follow. The small scale height of our RSG atmosphere model suggests that the breakout signature is a thermal soft X-ray burst (lambda_peak ~ 90\AA) with a duration of <~ 2000 s. Longer durations are possible but require either an extended and tenuous non-standard envelope, or an unusually dense RSG wind with \dot{M} ~ 10^(-3) Msun yr^(-1). The GALEX observations miss the peak of the luminous (M_FUV ~ -20) UV burst but unambiguously capture the rise of the emission and a subsequent 2 day long plateau. The postbreakout, UV-bright plateau is a prediction of our model in which the shift of the peak of the spectral energy distribution (SED) from ~100 to ~1000\AA and the ejecta expansion both counteract the decrease in bolometric luminosity from ~10^11 to ~10^9 L_sun over that period. Based on the observed detection efficiency of our study we make predictions for the breakout detection rate of the GALEX Time Domain Survey.
  • The acceleration of the expansion of the universe, and the need for Dark Energy, were inferred from the observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). There is consensus that SNe Ia are thermonuclear explosions that destroy carbon-oxygen white dwarf stars that accrete matter from a companion star, although the nature of this companion remains uncertain. SNe Ia are thought to be reliable distance indicators because they have a standard amount of fuel and a uniform trigger -- they are predicted to explode when the mass of the white dwarf nears the Chandrasekhar mass -- 1.4 solar masses. Here we show that the high redshift supernova SNLS-03D3bb has an exceptionally high luminosity and low kinetic energy that both imply a super-Chandrasekhar mass progenitor. Super-Chandrasekhar mass SNe Ia should preferentially occur in a young stellar population, so this may provide an explanation for the observed trend that overluminous SNe Ia only occur in young environments. Since this supernova does not obey the relations that allow them to be calibrated as standard candles, and since no counterparts have been found at low redshift, future cosmology studies will have to consider contamination from such events.