• Infrared variability is common among young stellar objects, with surveys finding daily to weekly fluctuations of a few tenths of a magnitude. Space-based observations can produce highly sampled infrared light curves, but are often limited to total baselines of about a month due to the orientation of the spacecraft. Here we present observations of the Chameleon I cluster whose low declination makes it observable by the Spitzer space telescope over a 200 day period. We observe 30 young stellar objects with a daily cadence to better sample variability on timescales of months. We find such variability is common, occurring in ~80% of the detected cluster members. The change in [3.6]-[4.5] color over 200 days for many of the sources falls between that expected for extinction and fluctuations in disk emission. With our high cadence and long baseline we can derive power spectral density curves covering two orders of magnitude in frequency and find significant power at low frequencies, up to the boundaries of our 200 day survey. Such long timescales are difficult to explain with variations driven by the interaction between the disk and stellar magnetic field, which has a dynamical timescale of days to weeks. The most likely explanation is either structural or temperature fluctuations spread throughout the inner ~0.5 au of the disk, suggesting that the intrinsic dust structure is highly dynamic.
  • We present new deep UBVRI images and high-resolution multi-object optical spectroscopy of the young (~ 6 - 10 Myr old), relatively nearby (800 pc) open cluster IC 2395. We identify nearly 300 cluster members and use the photometry to estimate their spectral types, which extend from early B to middle M. We also present an infrared imaging survey of the central region using the IRAC and MIPS instruments on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, covering the wavelength range from 3.6 to 24 microns. Our infrared observations allow us to detect dust in circumstellar disks originating over a typical range of radii ~ 0.1 to ~ 10AU from the central star. We identify 18 Class II, 8 transitional disk, and 23 debris disk candidates, respectively 6.5%, 2.9%, and 8.3% of the cluster members with appropriate data. We apply the same criteria for transitional disk identification to 19 other stellar clusters and associations spanning ages from ~ 1 to ~ 18 Myr. We find that the number of disks in the transitional phase as a fraction of the total with strong 24 micron excesses ([8] - [24] > 1.5) increases from 8.4 +\- 1.3% at ~ 3 Myr to 46 +\- 5% at ~ 10 Myr. Alternative definitions of transitional disks will yield different percentages but should show the same trend.
  • We present our investigation of 319 Class II objects in Orion A observed by $Spitzer$/IRS. We also present the follow-up observation of 120 of these Class II objects in Orion A from IRTF/SpeX. We measure continuum spectral indices, equivalent widths, and integrated fluxes that pertain to disk structure and dust composition from IRS spectra of Class II objects in Orion A. We estimate mass accretion rates using hydrogen recombination lines in the SpeX spectra of our targets. Utilizing these properties, we compare the distributions of the disk and dust properties of Orion A disks to those of Taurus disks with respect to position within Orion A (ONC and L1641) and to the sub-groups by the inferred radial structures, such as transitional disks vs. radially continuous full disks. Our main findings are as follows. (1) Inner disks evolve faster than the outer disks. (2) Mass accretion rate of transitional disks and that of radially continuous full disks are statistically significantly displaced from each other. The median mass accretion rate of radially continuous disks in ONC and L1641 is not very different from that in Taurus. (3) Less grain processing has occurred in the disks in ONC compared to those in Taurus, based on analysis of the shape index of the 10 $\mu$m silicate feature ($F_{11.3}/F_{9.8}$). (4) The 20-31 $\mu$m continuum spectral index tracks the projected distance from the most luminous Trapezium star, $\theta^{1}$ Ori C. A possible explanation is the effect of UV ablation of the outer part of the disks.
  • LRLL 54361 is an infrared source located in the star forming region IC 348 SW. Remarkably, its infrared luminosity increases by a factor of 10 during roughly one week every 25.34 days. To understand the origin of these remarkable periodic variations, we obtained sensitive 3.3 cm JVLA radio continuum observations of LRLL 54361 and its surroundings in six different epochs: three of them during the IR-on state and three during the IR-off state. The radio source associated with LRLL 54361 remained steady and did not show a correlation with the IR variations. We suggest that the IR is tracing the results of fast (with a timescale of days) pulsed accretion from an unseen binary companion, while the radio traces an ionized outflow with an extent of $\sim$100 AU that smooths out the variability over a period of order a year. The average flux density measured in these 2014 observations, 27$\pm$5 $\mu$Jy, is about a factor of two less than that measured about 1.5 years before, $53\pm$11 $\mu$Jy, suggesting that variability in the radio is present, but over larger timescales than in the IR. We discuss other sources in the field, in particular two infrared/X-ray stars that show rapidly varying gyrosynchrotron emission.
  • Transition disc systems are young stars that appear to be on the verge of dispersing their protoplanetary discs. We explore the nature of these systems by comparing the stellar accretion rates and disc masses of transition discs and normal T Tauri stars in Taurus and Ophiuchus. After controlling for the known dependencies of stellar accretion rate and disc mass and on age, stellar accretion rate on stellar mass, and disc mass on the presence of stellar or sub-stellar companions, we find that the normal T Tauri stars show a trend of stellar accretion rate increasing with disc mass. The transition discs tend to have higher average disc masses than normal T Tauri stars as well as lower accretion rates than normal T Tauri stars of the same disc mass. These results are most consistent with the interpretation that the transition discs have formed objects massive enough to alter the accretion flow, i.e., single or multiple giant planets. Several Ophiuchus T Tauri stars that are not known transition disc systems also have very low accretion rates for their disc masses. We speculate on the possible nature of these sources.
  • Variability in the infrared emission from disks around pre-main sequence stars over the course of days to weeks appears to be common, but the physical cause of the changes in disk structure are not constrained. Here we present coordinated monitoring of one young cluster with the Spitzer and Chandra space telescopes aimed at studying the physical source of the variability. In fall 2011 we obtained ten epochs of Chandra ACIS photometry over a period of 30 days with a roughly 3 day cadence contemporaneous with 20 epochs of Spitzer [3.6],[4.5] photometry over 40 days with a roughly 2 day cadence of the IC 348 cluster. This cadence allows us to search for week to month long responses of the infrared emission to changes in the high-energy flux. We find no strong evidence for a direct link between the X-ray and infrared variability on these timescales among 39 cluster members with circumstellar disks. There is no significant correlation between the shape of the infrared and X-ray light curves, or between the size of the X-ray and infrared variability. Among the stars with an X-ray flare none showed evidence of a correlated change in the infrared photometry on timescales of days to weeks following the flare. This lack of connection implies that X-ray heating of the planet forming region of the disk is not significant, although we cannot rule out rapid or instantaneous changes in infrared emission.
  • We report Herschel/PACS photometric observations at 70 {\mu}m and 160 {\mu}m of LRLL54361 - a suspected binary protostar that exhibits periodic (P=25.34 days) flux variations at shorter wavelengths (3.6 {\mu}m and 4.5 {\mu}m) thought to be due to pulsed accretion caused by binary motion. The PACS observations show unprecedented flux variation at these far-infrared wavelengths that are well cor- related with the variations at shorter wavelengths. At 70 {\mu}m the object increases its flux by a factor of six while at 160{\mu}m the change is about a factor of two, consistent with the wavelength dependence seen in the far-infrared spectra. The source is marginally resolved at 70 {\mu}m with varying FWHM. Deconvolved images of the sources show elongations exactly matching the outflow cavities traced by the scattered light observations. The spatial variations are anti-correlated with the flux variation indicating that a light echo is responsible for the changes in FWHM. The observed far-infrared flux variability indicates that the disk and en- velope of this source is periodically heated by the accretion pulses of the central source, and suggests that such long wavelength variability in general may provide a reasonable proxy for accretion variations in protostars.
  • Transitional disks are objects whose inner disk regions have undergone substantial clearing. The Spitzer Space Telescope produced detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of transitional disks that allowed us to infer their radial dust disk structure in some detail, revealing the diversity of this class of disks. The growing sample of transitional disks also opened up the possibility of demographic studies, which provided unique insights. There now exist (sub)millimeter and infrared images that confirm the presence of large clearings of dust in transitional disks. In addition, protoplanet candidates have been detected within some of these clearings. Transitional disks are thought to be a strong link to planet formation around young stars and are a key area to study if further progress is to be made on understanding the initial stages of planet formation. Here we provide a review and synthesis of transitional disk observations to date with the aim of providing timely direction to the field, which is about to undergo its next burst of growth as ALMA reaches its full potential. We discuss what we have learned about transitional disks from SEDs, color-color diagrams, and imaging in the (sub)mm and infrared. We then distill the observations into constraints for the main disk clearing mechanisms proposed to date (i.e., photoevaporation, grain growth, and companions) and explore how the expected observational signatures from these mechanisms, particularly planet-induced disk clearing, compare to actual observations. Lastly, we discuss future avenues of inquiry to be pursued with ALMA, JWST, and next generation of ground-based telescopes.
  • Transitional disks are protoplanetary disks around young stars, with inner holes or gaps which are surrounded by optically thick outer, and often inner, disks. Here we present observations of 62 new transitional disks in the Orion A star-forming region. These were identified using the \textit{Spitzer Space Telescope}'s Infrared Spectrograph and followed up with determinations of stellar and accretion parameters using the Infrared Telescope Facility's SpeX. We combine these new observations with our previous results on transitional disks in Taurus, Chamaeleon I, Ophiuchus and Perseus, and with archival X-ray observations. This produces a sample of 105 transitional disks of "cluster" age 3 Myr or less, by far the largest hitherto assembled. We use this sample to search for trends between the radial structure in the disks and many other system properties, in order to place constraints on the possible origins of transitional disks. We see a clear progression of host star accretion rate and the different disk morphologies. We confirm that transitional disks with complete central clearings have median accretion rates an order of magnitude smaller than radially continuous disks of the same population. Pre-transitional disks --- those objects with gaps that separate inner and outer disks --- have median accretion rates intermediate between the two. Our results from the search for statistically significant trends, especially related to $\dot{M}$, strongly support that in both cases the gaps are far more likely to be due to the gravitational influence of Jovian planets or brown dwarfs orbiting within the gaps, than to any of the photoevaporative, turbulent or grain-growth processes that can lead to disk dissipation. We also find that the fraction of Class II YSOs which are transitional disks is large, 0.1-0.2, especially in the youngest associations.
  • Periodic increases in luminosity arising from variable accretion rates have been predicted for some close pre-main sequence binary stars as they grow from circumbinary disks. The phenomenon is known as "pulsed accretion" and can affect the orbital evolution and mass distribution of young binaries, as well as the potential for planet formation in the circumbinary environment. Accretion variability is a common feature of young stars, with a large range of amplitudes and timescales as measured from multi-epoch observations at optical and infrared wavelengths. Periodic variations consistent with pulsed accretion have been seen in only a few young binaries via optical accretion tracers, albeit intermittently with accretion luminosity variations ranging from 0-50 percent from orbit to orbit. Here we report on a young protostar (age ~10^5 yr) that exhibits periodic variability in which the infrared luminosity increases by a factor of 10 in roughly one week every 25.34 days. We attribute this to pulsed accretion associated with an unseen binary companion. The strength and regularity of this accretion signal is surprising; it may be related to the very young age of the system, which is a factor of ten younger than the other pulsed accretors previously studied.
  • We present the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph spectrum of the Orion A protostar HOPS-68. The mid-infrared spectrum reveals crystalline substructure at 11.1, 16.1, 18.8, 23.6, 27.9, and 33.6 microns superimposed on the broad 9.7 and 18 micron amorphous silicate features; the substructure is well matched by the presence of the olivine end-member forsterite. Crystalline silicates are often observed as infrared emission features around the circumstellar disks of Herbig Ae/Be stars and T Tauri stars. However, this is the first unambiguous detection of crystalline silicate absorption in a cold, infalling, protostellar envelope. We estimate the crystalline mass fraction along the line-of-sight by first assuming that the crystalline silicates are located in a cold absorbing screen and secondly by utilizing radiative transfer models. The resulting crystalline mass fractions of 0.14 and 0.17, respectively, are significantly greater than the upper limit found in the interstellar medium (< 0.02-0.05). We propose that the amorphous silicates were annealed within the hot inner disk and/or envelope regions and subsequently transported outward into the envelope by entrainment in a protostellar outflow
  • Variability is a defining characteristic of young stellar systems, and optical variability has been heavily studied to select and characterize the photospheric properties of young stars. In recent years, multi-epoch observations sampling a wider range of wavelengths and time-scales have revealed a wealth of time-variable phenomena at work during the star formation process. This splinter session was convened to summarize recent progress in providing improved coverage and understanding of time-variable processes in young stars and circumstellar disks. We begin by summarizing results from several multi-epoch Spitzer campaigns, which have demonstrated that many young stellar objects evidence significant mid-IR variability. While some of these variations can be attributed to processes in the stellar photosphere, others appear to trace short time-scale changes in the circumstellar disk which can be successfully modeled with axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric structures. We also review recent studies probing variability at shorter wavelengths that provide evidence for high frequency pulsations associated with accretion outbursts, correlated optical/X-ray variability in Classical T Tauri stars, and magnetic reversals in young solar analogs.
  • We present high resolution (R=55,000) optical spectra obtained with MIKE on the 6.5 m Magellan Clay Telescope as well as Spitzer MIPS photometry and IRS low resolution (R~60) spectroscopy of the close (14 AU separation) binary, HD 101088, a member of the ~12 Myr old southern region of the Lower Centaurus Crux (LCC) subgroup of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association. We find that the primary and/or secondary is accreting from a tenuous circumprimary and/or circumsecondary disk despite the apparent lack of a massive circumbinary disk. We estimate a lower limit to the accretion rate of > 1x10^-9 solar masses per year, which our multiple observation epochs show varies over a timescale of months. The upper limit on the 70 micron flux allows us to place an upper limit on the mass of dust grains smaller than several microns present in a circumbinary disk of 0.16 moon masses. We conclude that the classification of disks into either protoplanetary or debris disks based on fractional infrared luminosity alone may be misleading.
  • [abridged] Protoplanetary disks with AU-scale inner clearings, often referred to as transitional disks, provide a unique sample for understanding disk dissipation mechanisms and possible connections to planet formation. Observations of young stellar clusters with the Spitzer Space Telescope have amassed mid-infrared spectral energy distributions for thousands of star-disk systems from which transition disks can be identified. From a sample of 8 relatively nearby young regions (d <= 400 pc), we have identified about 20 such objects, which we term "classical" transition disks, spanning a wide range of stellar age and mass. We also identified two additional categories representing more ambiguous cases: "warm excess" objects with transition-like spectral energy distributions but moderate excess at 5.8 microns, and "weak excess" objects with smaller 24 micron excess that may be optically thin or exhibit advanced dust grain growth and settling. From existing Halpha emission measurements, we find evidence for different accretion activity among the three categories, with a majority of the classical and warm excess transition objects still accreting gas through their inner holes and onto the central stars, while a smaller fraction of the weak transition objects are accreting at detectable rates. We find a possible age dependence to the frequency of classical transition objects, with fractions relative to the total population of disks in a given region of a few percent at 1-2 Myr rising to 10-20% at 3-10 Myr. The trend is even stronger if the weak and warm excess objects are included. Classical transition disks appear to be less common, and weak transition disks more common, around lower-mass stars (M <= 0.3 Msun).
  • We present multi-epoch Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transitional disk LRLL 31 in the 2-3 Myr-old star forming region IC 348. Our measurements show remarkable mid-infrared variability on timescales as short as one week. The infrared continuum emission exhibits systematic wavelength-dependent changes that suggest corresponding dynamical changes in the inner disk structure and variable shadowing of outer disk material. We propose several possible sources for the structural changes, including a variable accretion rate or a stellar or planetary companion embedded in the disk. Our results indicate that variability studies in the infrared can provide important new constraints on protoplanetary disk behavior.
  • We present a Spitzer IRAC and MIPS survey of NGC 2451 A and B, two open clusters in the 50-80 Myr age range. We complement these data with extensive ground-based photometry and spectroscopy to identify the cluster members in the Spitzer survey field. We find only two members with 8 micron excesses. The incidence of excesses at 24 microns is much higher, 11 of 31 solar-like stars and 1 of 7 early-type (A) stars. This work nearly completes the debris disk surveys with Spitzer of clusters in the 30-130 Myr range. This range is of inte rest because it is when large planetesimal collisions may have still been relatively common (as indicated by the one that led to the formation of the Moon during this period of the evolution of the Solar System). We review the full set of surveys and find that there are only three possible cases out of about 250 roughly solar-mass stars where very large excesses suggest that such collisions have occurred recently.
  • We present images and initial results from our extensive Spitzer Space Telescope imaging survey of the W5 H II region with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). We detect dense clusters of stars, centered on the O stars: HD 18326, BD +60 586, HD 17505 and HD 17520. At 24 microns substantial extended emission is visible, presumably from heated dust grains that survive in the strongly ionizing environment of the H {\sc ii} region. With photometry of more than 18000 point sources, we analyze the clustering properties of objects classified as young stars by their IR spectral energy distributions (a total of 2064 sources) across the region using a minimal-spanning-tree algorithm. We find ~40--70% of infrared excess sources belong to clusters with >10 members. We find that within the evacuated cavities of the H II regions that make up W5, the ratio of Class II to Class I sources is ~7 times higher than for objects coincident with molecular gas as traced by 12CO emission and near-IR extinction maps. We attribute this contrast to an age difference between the two locations, and postulate that at least two distinct generations of star formation are visible across W5. Our preliminary analysis shows that triggering is a plausible mechanism to explain the multiple generations of star formation in W5, and merits further investigation.
  • Recently, analysis of near-infrared broad-band photometry and Spitzer IRS spectra has led to the identification of a new "pre-transitional disk" class whose members have an inner optically thick disk separated from an outer optically thick disk by an optically thin gap. This is in contrast to the "transitional disks" which have inner disk holes (i.e. large reductions of small dust from the star out to an outer optically thick wall). In LkCa 15, one of these proposed pre-transitional disks, detailed modeling showed that although the near-infrared fluxes could be understood in terms of optically thick material at the dust sublimation radius, an alternative model of emission from optically thin dust over a wide range of radii could explain the observations as well. To unveil the true nature of LkCa 15's inner disk we obtained a medium-resolution near-infrared spectrum spanning the wavelength range 2-5 microns using SpeX at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We report that the excess near-infrared emission above the photosphere of LkCa 15 is a black-body continuum which can only be due to optically thick material in an inner disk around the star. When this confirmation of a primordial inner disk is combined with earlier observations of an inner edge to LkCa 15's outer disk it reveals a gapped structure. Forming planets emerge as the most likely mechanism for clearing the gap we detect in this evolving disk.
  • The unusual properties of transition objects (young stars with an optically thin inner disc surrounded by an optically thick outer disc) suggest that significant disc evolution has occured in these systems. We explore the nature of these systems by examining their demographics, specifically their stellar accretion rates (Mdot) and disc masses (Mdisc) compared to those of accreting T Tauri stars of comparable age. We find that transition objects in Taurus occupy a restricted region of the Mdot vs. Mdisc plane. Compared to non-transition single stars in Taurus, they have stellar accretion rates that are typically ~10 times lower at the same disc mass and median disc masses ~4 times larger. These properties are anticipated by several proposed planet formation theories and suggest that the formation of Jovian mass planets may play a significant role in explaining the origin of at least some transition objects. Considering transition objects as a distinct demographic group among accreting T Tauri stars leads to a tighter relationship between disc masses and stellar accretion rates, with a slope between the two quantities that is close to the value of unity expected in simple theories of disc accretion.
  • We present a Spitzer based census of the IC 348 nebula and embedded star cluster. Our Spitzer census supplemented by ground based spectra has added 42 class II T-Tauri sources to the cluster membership and identified ~20 class 0/I protostars. The population of IC 348 likely exceeds 400 sources after accounting statistically for unidentified diskless members. Our Spitzer census of IC 348 reveals a population of protostars that is anti-correlated spatially with the T-Tauri members, which comprise the centrally condensed cluster around a B star. The protostars are instead found mostly at the cluster periphery about 1 pc from the B star and spread out along a filamentary ridge. We find that the star formation rate in this protostellar ridge is consistent with that rate which built the exposed cluster while the presence of fifteen cold, starless, millimeter cores intermingled with this protostellar population indicates that the IC 348 nebula has yet to finish forming stars. We show that the IC 348 cluster is of order 3-5 crossing times old, and, as evidenced by its smooth radial profile and confirmed mass segregation, is likely relaxed. While it seems apparent that the current cluster configuration is the result of dynamical evolution and its primordial structure has been erased, our findings support a model where embedded clusters are built up from numerous smaller sub-clusters. Finally, the results of our Spitzer census indicate that the supposition that star formation must progress rapidly in a dark cloud should not preclude these observations that show it can be relatively long lived.
  • We present the results from a survey of NGC 2244 from 3.6 to 24 micron with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 24micron-8micron-3.6micron color composite image of the region shows that the central cavity surrounding the multiple O and B stars of NGC2244 contains a large amount of cool dust visible only at 24micron. Our survey gives a detailed look at disk survivability within the hot-star-dominated environment in this cavity. Using mid infrared two color diagrams ([3.6]-[4.5] vs [5.8]-[8.0]) we identified 337 class II and 25 class I objects out of 1084 objects detected in all four of these bands with photometric uncertainty better than 10%. Including the 24 micron data, we found 213 class II and 20 class I sources out of 279 stars detected also at this latter band. The center of the class II density contours is in very good agreement with the center of the cluster detected in the 2MASS images. We studied the distribution of the class II sources relative to the O stars and found that the effect of high mass stars on the circumstellar disks is significant only in their immediate vicinity.
  • We performed a 24 micron 2 Deg X 1 Deg survey of the Pleiades cluster, using the MIPS instrument on Spitzer. Fifty four members ranging in spectral type from B8 to K6 show 24 micron fluxes consistent with bare photospheres. All Be stars show excesses attributed to free-free emission in their gaseous envelopes. Five early-type stars and four solar-type stars show excesses indicative of debris disks. We find a debris disk fraction of 25 % for B-A members and 10 % for F-K3 ones. These fractions appear intermediate between those for younger clusters and for the older field stars. They indicate a decay with age of the frequency of the dust-production events inside the planetary zone, with similar time scales for solar-mass stars as have been found previously for A-stars.
  • Observations of T Tauri stars and young brown dwarfs suggest that the accretion rates of their disks scale strongly with the central stellar mass, approximately $\mdot \propto M_*^2$. No dependence of accretion rate on stellar mass is predicted by the simplest version of the layered disk model of Gammie (1996), in which non-thermal ionization of upper disk layers allows accretion to occur via the magnetorotational instability. We show that a minor modification of Gammie's model to include heating by irradiation from the central star yields a modest dependence of $\mdot$ upon the mass of the central star. A purely viscous disk model could provide a strong dependence of accretion rate on stellar mass if the initial disk radius (before much viscous evolution has occurred) has a strong dependence on stellar mass. However, it is far from clear that at least the most massive pre-main sequence disks can be totally magnetically activated by X-rays or cosmic rays. We suggest that a combination of effects are responsible for the observed dependence, with the lowest-mass stars having the lowest mass disks, which can be thoroughly magnetically active, while the higher-mass stars have higher mass disks which have layered accretion and relatively inactive or ``dead'' central zones at some radii. In such dead zones, we suggest that gravitational instabilities may play a role in allowing accretion to proceed. In this connection, we emphasize the uncertainty in disk masses derived from dust emission, and argue that T Tauri disk masses have been systematically underestimated by conventional analyses. Further study of accretion rates, especially in the lowest-mass stars, would help to clarify the mechanisms of accretion in T Tauri stars.
  • We present observations of six late-type members of the young cluster IC 348 detected at 24 microns with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer(MIPS). At least four of the objects are probably substellar. Combining these data with ground-based optical and near-infrared photometry and complementary observations with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), we have modeled the spectral energy distributions using detailed models of irradiated accretion disks. We are able to fit the observations with models using a range of maximum grain sizes from ISM-type dust to grains as large as 1 millimeter. Two objects show a lack of excess emission at wavelengths shortward of 5.8-8 microns but significant excess at longer wavelengths, indicative of large optically thin or evacuated inner holes. Our models indicate a inner hole of radius ~ 0.5-0.9 AU for the brown dwarf L316; this is the first brown dwarf with evidence for an AU-scale inner disk hole. We examine several possible mechanisms for the inner disk clearing in this case, including photoevaporation and planet formation.
  • We present the discovery of debris systems around three solar mass stars based upon observations performed with the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of a Legacy Science Program, ``the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems'' (FEPS). We also confirm the presence of debris around two other stars. All the stars exhibit infrared emission in excess of the expected photospheres in the 70 micron band, but are consistent with photospheric emission at <= 33 micron. This restricts the maximum temperature of debris in equilibrium with the stellar radiation to T < 70 K. We find that these sources are relatively old in the FEPS sample, in the age range 0.7 - 3 Gyr. Based on models of the spectral energy distributions, we suggest that these debris systems represent materials generated by collisions of planetesimal belts. We speculate on the nature of these systems through comparisons to our own Kuiper Belt, and on the likely planet(s) responsible for stirring the system and ultimately releasing dust through collisions. We further report observations of a nearby star HD 13974 (d =11 pc) that is indistinguishable from a bare photosphere at both 24 micron and 70 micron. The observations place strong upper limits on the presence of any cold dust in this nearby system (L_IR/L_* < 10^{-5.2}).