• We summarize observations with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) of 571 starbursts (strong PAH emission features), 128 obscured AGN (strong silicate absorption), and 39 unobscured AGN (silicate emission). Sources range in luminosity from 10^{8} to 10^{14} solar luminosities and continuously in redshift for 0 < z < 3. The most luminous starbursts and AGN evolve as (1+z)^{2.5} to z ~ 2.5; no clear evidence is found that this evolution ceases beyond z = 2.5. Dust obscuration in starbursts is determined by comparing PAH luminosity with ultraviolet luminosity and indicates severe obscuration in most starbursts, even those selected in the ultraviolet; the median ratio (intrinsic ultraviolet/observed ultraviolet) is ~ 50 for infrared selected starbursts and ~ 8 for ultraviolet selected starbursts. Obscuration increases with bolometric luminosity, but starbursts which appear most luminous in the ultraviolet are those with the least obscuration. This result indicates that extinction corrections are significantly underestimated for ultraviolet selected sources, suggesting that galaxies at z ~> 2 are more luminous than deduced only from rest frame ultraviolet observations.
  • We present samples of starburst galaxies that represent the extremes discovered with infrared and ultraviolet observations, including 25 Markarian galaxies, 23 ultraviolet luminous galaxies discovered with GALEX, and the 50 starburst galaxies having the largest infrared/ultraviolet ratios. These sources have z < 0.5 and cover a luminosity range of ~ 10^4. Comparisons between infrared luminosities determined with the 7.7 um PAH feature and ultraviolet luminosities from the stellar continuum at 153 nm are used to determine obscuration in starbursts and dependence of this obscuration on infrared or ultraviolet luminosity. A strong selection effect arises for the ultraviolet-selected samples: the brightest sources appear bright because they have the least obscuration. Obscuration correction for the ultraviolet-selected Markarian+GALEX sample has the form log[UV(intrinsic)/UV(observed)] = 0.07(+-0.04)M(UV)+2.09+-0.69 but for the full infrared-selected Spitzer sample is log[UV(intrinsic)/UV(observed)] = 0.17(+-0.02)M(UV)+4.55+-0.4. The relation of total bolometric luminosity L_{ir} to M(UV) is also determined for infrared-selected and ultraviolet-selected samples. For ultraviolet-selected galaxies, log L_{ir} = -(0.33+-0.04)M(UV)+4.52+-0.69. For the full infrared-selected sample, log L_{ir} = -(0.23+-0.02)M(UV)+6.99+-0.41, all for L_{ir} in solar luminosities and M(UV) the AB magnitude at rest frame 153 nm. These results imply that obscuration corrections by factors of two to three determined from reddening of the ultraviolet continuum for Lyman Break Galaxies with z > 2 are insufficient, and should be at least a factor of 10 for M(UV) about -17, with decreasing correction for more luminous sources.
  • A summary of mid-infrared continuum luminosities arising from dust is given for very luminous galaxies, Lir > 10^12 solar luminosities, with 0.005 < z < 3.2 containing active galactic nuclei (AGN), including 115 obscured AGN and 60 unobscured (type 1) AGN. All sources have been observed with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Obscured AGN are defined as having optical depth > 0.7 in the 9.7 um silicate absorption feature and unobscured AGN show silicate in emission. Luminosity vLv(8 um) is found to scale as (1+z)^2.6 to z = 2.8, and luminosities vLv(8 um) are approximately 3 times greater for the most luminous unobscured AGN. Total infrared luminosities for the most luminous obscured AGN, Lir(AGN_obscured) in solar luminosities, scale as log Lir(AGN_obscured) = 12.3+-0.25 + 2.6(+-0.3)log(1+z), and for the most luminous unobscured AGN, scale as log Lir(AGN1) = 12.6+-0.15 + 2.6(+-0.3)log(1+z), indicating that the most luminous AGN are about 10 times more luminous than the most luminous starbursts. Results are consistent with obscured and unobscured AGN having the same total luminosities with differences arising only from orientation, such that the obscured AGN are observed through very dusty clouds which extinct about 50% of the intrinsic luminosity at 8 um. Both obscured and unobscured AGN should be detected to z ~ 6 by Spitzer surveys with fv(24 um) > 0.3 mJy, even without luminosity evolution for z > 2.5. By contrast, the most luminous starbursts cannot be detected for z > 3, even if luminosity evolution continues beyond z = 2.5.
  • Using the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, we present low-resolution (64 < lambda / dlambda < 124), mid-infrared (20-38 micron) spectra of 23 high-redshift ULIRGs detected in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. All of the sources were selected to have 1) fnu(24 micron) > 0.5 mJy; 2) R-[24] > 14 Vega mag; and 3) a prominent rest-frame 1.6 micron stellar photospheric feature redshifted into Spitzer's 3-8 micron IRAC bands. Of these, 20 show emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), usually interpreted as signatures of star formation. The PAH features indicate redshifts in the range 1.5 < z < 3.0, with a mean of <z>=1.96 and a dispersion of 0.30. Based on local templates, these sources have extremely large infrared luminosities, comparable to that of submillimeter galaxies. Our results confirm previous indications that the rest-frame 1.6 micron stellar bump can be efficiently used to select highly obscured starforming galaxies at z~2, and that the fraction of starburst-dominated ULIRGs increases to faint 24 micron flux densities. Using local templates, we find that the observed narrow redshift distribution is due to the fact that the 24 micron detectability of PAH-rich sources peaks sharply at z = 1.9. We can analogously explain the broader redshift distribution of Spitzer-detected AGN-dominated ULIRGs based on the shapes of their SEDs. Finally, we conclude that z~2 sources with a detectable 1.6 micron stellar opacity feature lack sufficient AGN emission to veil the 7.7 micron PAH band.
  • The mid-infrared spectroscopic analysis of a flux-limited sample of galaxies with fv(24um) > 10 mJy is presented. Sources observed are taken from the Spitzer First Look Survey (FLS) catalog and from the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey region in Bootes (NDWFS). The spectroscopic sample includes 60 of the 100 sources in these combined catalogs having fv(24um) > 10 mJy. New spectra from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph are presented for 25 FLS sources and for 11 Bootes AGN; these are combined with 24 Bootes starburst galaxies previously published to determine the distribution of mid-infrared spectral characteristics for the total 10 mJy sample. Sources have 0.01 < z < 2.4 and 41.8 < log vLv(15um) < 46.2 (ergs/s). Average spectra are determined as a function of luminosity; lower luminosity sources (log vLv(15um) < 44.0) are dominated by PAH features and higher luminosity sources (log vLv(15um) > 44.0) are dominated by silicate absorption or emission. We find that a rest frame equivalent width of 0.4um for the 6.2um PAH emission feature provides a well defined division between lower luminosity, "pure" starbursts and higher luminosity AGN or composite sources. Using the average spectra, fluxes fv(24um) which would be observed with the Spitzer MIPS are predicted as a function of redshift for sources with luminosities that correspond to the average spectra. AGN identical to those in this 10 mJy sample could be seen to z = 3 with fv(24um) > 1 mJy, but starbursts fall to fv(24um) < 1 mJy by z ~ 0.5. This indicates that substantial luminosity evolution of starbursts is required to explain the numerous starbursts found in other IRS results having fv(24um) > 1 mJy and z ~ 2.
  • A summary of starburst luminosities based on PAH features is given for 243 starburst galaxies with 0 < z < 2.5, observed with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Luminosity vLv(7.7um) for the peak luminosity of the 7.7um PAH emission feature is found to scale as log[vLv(7.7um)] = 44.63(+-0.09) + 2.48(+-0.28)log(1+z) for the most luminous starbursts observed. Empirical calibrations of vLv(7.7um) are used to determine bolometric luminosity Lir and the star formation rate (SFR) for these starbursts. The most luminous starbursts found in this sample have log Lir = 45.4(+-0.3) + 2.5(+-0.3)log(1+z), in ergs per s, and the maximum star formation rates for starbursts in units of solar masses per yr are log(SFR) = 2.1(+-0.3) + 2.5(+-0.3)log(1+z), up to z = 2.5. The exponent for pure luminosity evolution agrees with optical and radio studies of starbursts but is flatter than previous results based in infrared source counts. The maximum star formation rates are similar to the maxima determined for submillimeter galaxies; the most luminous individual starburst included within the sample has log Lir = 46.9, which gives a SFR = 3400 solar masses per yr.
  • We present ground-based SpectroCam-10 mid-infrared, MMT optical, and Spitzer Space Telescope IRS mid-infrared spectra taken 7.62, 18.75, and 19.38 years respectively after the outburst of the old classical nova QU Vulpeculae (Nova Vul 1984 #2). The spectra of the ejecta are dominated by forbidden line emission from neon and oxygen. Our analysis shows that neon was, at the first and last epochs respectively, more than 76 and 168 times overabundant by number with respect to hydrogen compared to the solar value. These high lower limits to the neon abundance confirm that QU Vul involved a thermonuclear runaway on an ONeMg white dwarf and approach the yields predicted by models of the nucleosynthesis in such events.
  • We present our early results of the mapping of the nucleus of the starburst galaxy NGC 253 and its immediate surroundings using the Infrared Spectrograph onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The map is centered on the nucleus of the galaxy and spans the inner 800 x 688 pc2. The spatial distribution of the \neiii line at 15.55 microns and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons feature at 11.3 microns peaks at the center while the purely rotationnal transition of molecular hydrogen at 17.03 microns is strong over several slit positions. We perform a brief investigation of the implications of these measurement on the properties of the star formation in this region using theories developped to explain the deficiency of massive stars in starbursts.
  • We report the discovery of a bright (J = 13.83$\pm$0.03) methane brown dwarf, or T dwarf, by the Two Micron All Sky Survey. This object, 2MASSI J0559191-140448, is the first brown dwarf identified by the newly commissioned CorMASS instrument mounted on the Palomar 60-inch Telescope. Near-infrared spectra from 0.9 - 2.35 $\micron$ show characteristic CH$_4$ bands at 1.1, 1.3, 1.6, and 2.2 $\micron$, which are significantly shallower than those seen in other T dwarfs discovered to date. Coupled with the detection of an FeH band at 0.9896 $\micron$ and two sets of K I doublets at J-band, we propose that 2MASS J0559-14 is a warm T dwarf, close to the transition between L and T spectral classes. The brightness of this object makes it a good candidate for detailed investigation over a broad wavelength regime and at higher resolution.