• Since their discovery, submillimetre-selected galaxies (SMGs) have revolutionized the field of galaxy formation and evolution. From the hundreds of square degrees mapped at submillimetre wavelengths, only a handful of sources have been confirmed to lie at z>5 and only two at z>6. All of these SMGs are rare examples of extreme starburst galaxies with star formation rates (SFRs) of >1000 M_sun/yr and therefore are not representative of the general population of dusty star-forming galaxies. Consequently, our understanding of the nature of these sources, at the earliest epochs, is still incomplete. Here we report the spectroscopic identification of a gravitationally amplified (mu = 9.3 +/- 1.0) dusty star-forming galaxy at z=6.027. After correcting for gravitational lensing, we derive an intrinsic less-extreme SFR of 380 +/- 50 M_sun/yr for this source and find that its gas and dust properties are similar to those measured for local Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs), extending the local trends to a poorly explored territory in the early Universe. The star-formation efficiency of this galaxy is similar to those measured in its local analogues, despite a ~12 Gyr difference in cosmic time.
  • We have used the Submillimeter Array at 860$\,\mu$m to observe the brightest SCUBA-2 sources in 4$\,$deg$^{2}$ of the Cosmology Legacy Survey. We have targeted 75 of the brightest single-dish SCUBA-2 850$\,\mu$m sources down to $S_{850}\,{\approx}\,8\,$mJy, achieving an average synthesized beam of 2.4$^{\prime\prime}$ and an average rms of $\sigma_{860}\,{=}\,1.5\,$mJy in our primary beam-corrected maps. We searched our maps for $4\sigma$ peaks, corresponding to $S_{860}\,{\gtrsim}\,6\,$mJy sources, and detected 59 single galaxies and three pairs of galaxies. We include in our study 28 archival observations, bringing our sample size to 103 bright single-dish submillimetre sources with interferometric follow-up. We compute the cumulative and differential number counts of our sample, finding them to overlap with previous single-dish survey number counts within the uncertainties, although our cumulative number count is systematically lower than the parent SCUBA-2 cumulative number count by $24\,{\pm}\,6$ per cent between 11 and 15$\,$mJy. We estimate the probability that a ${\gtrsim}\,10\,$mJy single-dish submillimetre source resolves into two or more galaxies with similar flux densities, causing a significant change in the number counts, to be about 15 per cent. Assuming the remaining 85 per cent of the targets are ultra-luminous starburst galaxies between $z\,{=}\,2$-3, we find a likely volume density of ${\gtrsim}\,400\,$M$_{\odot}\,$yr$^{-1}$ sources to be ${\sim}\,3^{+0.7}_{-0.6}\,{\times}\,10^{-7}\,$Mpc$^{-3}$. We show that the descendants of these galaxies could be ${\gtrsim}\,4\,{\times}\,10^{11}\,$M$_{\odot}$ local quiescent galaxies, and that about 10 per cent of their total stellar mass would have formed during these short bursts of star-formation.
  • We investigate the relationship between the quenching of star formation and the structural transformation of massive galaxies, using a large sample of photometrically-selected post-starburst galaxies in the UKIDSS UDS field. We find that post-starburst galaxies at high-redshift ($z>1$) show high S\'ersic indices, significantly higher than those of active star-forming galaxies, but with a distribution that is indistinguishable from the old quiescent population. We conclude that the morphological transformation occurs before (or during) the quenching of star formation. Recently quenched galaxies are also the most compact; we find evidence that massive post-starburst galaxies (M$_{\ast}> 10^{10.5} ~$M$_{\odot}$) at high redshift ($z>1$) are on average smaller than comparable quiescent galaxies at the same epoch. Our findings are consistent with a scenario in which massive passive galaxies are formed from three distinct phases: (1) gas-rich dissipative collapse to very high densities, forming the proto-spheroid; (2) rapid quenching of star formation, to create the "red nugget" with post-starburst features; (3) a gradual growth in size as the population ages, perhaps as a result of minor mergers.
  • The SCUBA-2 Ultra Deep Imaging EAO Survey (STUDIES) is a three-year JCMT Large Program aiming at reaching the 450 $\mu$m confusion limit in the COSMOS-CANDELS region, to study a representative sample of the high-redshift far-infrared galaxy population that gives rise to the bulk of the far-infrared background. We present the first-year data from STUDIES. We have reached a 450 $\mu$m noise level of 0.91~mJy for point sources at the map center, covered an area of 151 arcmin$^2$, and detected 98 and 141 sources at 4.0 and 3.5 $\sigma$, respectively. Our derived counts are best constrained in the 3.5-25 mJy regime using directly detected sources. Below the detection limits, our fluctuation analysis further constrains the slope of the counts down to 1 mJy. The resulting counts at 1-25 mJy are consistent with a power law having a slope of $-2.59$ ($\pm0.10$ for 3.5-25 mJy, and $^{+0.4}_{-0.7}$ for 1-3.5 mJy). There is no evidence of a faint-end termination or turn-over of the counts in this flux density range. Our counts are also consistent with previous SCUBA-2 blank-field and lensing cluster surveys. The integrated surface brightness from our counts down to 1 mJy is $90.0\pm17.2$ Jy deg$^{-2}$, which can account for up to $83^{+15}_{-16}\%$ of the COBE 450 $\mu$m background. We show that Herschel counts at 350 and 500 $\mu$m are significantly higher than our 450 $\mu$m counts, likely caused by its large beam and source clustering. High-angular resolution instruments like SCUBA-2 at 450 $\mu$m are therefore highly beneficial for measuring the luminosity and spatial density of high-redshift dusty galaxies.
  • We investigate the relation between the star formation rate (SFR) and the stellar mass (M), i.e. the Main Sequence (MS) relation of star-forming galaxies, at 1.3<=z<6 in the first four HST Frontier Fields, based on rest-frame UV observations. Gravitational lensing combined with deep HST observations allows us to extend the analysis of the MS down to stellar masses as low as logM/Msun~7.5 at z<~4 and logM/Msun~8 at higher redshifts, a factor of ~10 below most previous results. We perform an accurate simulation to take into account the effect of observational uncertainties on the MS and correct for the Eddington bias. This step allows us to reliably measure the MS and in particular its slope. While the normalization increases with redshift, we fit an unevolving and approximately linear slope. We nicely extend to lower masses the results of brighter surveys. Thanks to the large dynamic range in mass and by making use of the simulation, we analyzed any possible mass dependence of the dispersion around the MS. We find tentative evidence that the scatter decreases with increasing stellar masses, suggesting a larger variety of star formation histories in low mass galaxies. This trend agrees with theoretical predictions, and is explained as either a consequence of the smaller number of progenitors of low mass galaxies in a hierarchical scenario and/or of the efficient but intermittent stellar feedback processes in low mass halos. Finally, we observe an increase in the SFR per unit stellar mass with redshift milder than predicted by theoretical models, implying a still incomplete understanding of the processes responsible for galaxy growth.
  • We present the results of a new study of the K-band galaxy luminosity function (KLF) at redshifts z<3.75, based on a nested combination of the UltraVISTA, CANDELS and HUDF surveys. The large dynamic range in luminosity spanned by this new dataset (3-4 dex over the full redshift range) is sufficient to clearly demonstrate for the first time that the faint-end slope of the KLF at z>0.25 is relatively steep (-1.3<alpha<-1.5 for a single Schechter function), in good agreement with recent theoretical and phenomenological models. Moreover, based on our new dataset we find that a double Schechter function provides a significantly improved description of the KLF at z<2. At redshifts z>0.25 the evolution of the KLF is remarkably smooth, with little or no evolution evident at faint (M_K>-20.5) or bright magnitudes (M_K<-24.5). Instead, the KLF is seen to evolve rapidly at intermediate magnitudes, with the number density of galaxies at M_K~-23 dropping by a factor of ~5 over the redshift interval 0.25<z<3.75. Motivated by this, we explore a simple description of the evolving KLF based on a double Schechter function with fixed faint-end slopes (alpha_1=-0.5, alpha_2=-1.5) and a shared characteristic magnitude (M_K*). According to this parameterisation, the normalisation of the component which dominates the faint-end of the KLF remains approximately constant, with phi*_2 decreasing by only a factor of ~2 between z~0 and z~3.25. In contrast, the component which dominates the bright end of the KLF at low redshifts evolves dramatically, becoming essentially negligible by z~3. Finally, we note that within this parameterisation, the observed evolution of M_K* between z~0 and z~3.25 is entirely consistent with M_K* corresponding to a constant stellar mass of M*~5x10^10 Msun at all redshifts.
  • We present stacking analyses on our ALMA deep 1.1 mm imaging in the SXDF using 1.6 {\mu}m and 3.6 {\mu}m selected galaxies in the CANDELS WFC3 catalog. We detect a stacked flux of ~0.03-0.05 mJy, corresponding to LIR < 10^11 Lsun and a star formation rate (SFR) of ~ 15 Msun/yr at z = 2. We find that galaxies brighter in the rest-frame near-infrared tend to be also brighter at 1.1 mm, and galaxies fainter than m[3.6um] = 23 do not produce detectable 1.1 mm emission. This suggests a correlation between stellar mass and SFR, but outliers to this correlation are also observed, suggesting strongly boosted star formation or extremely large extinction. We also find tendencies that redder galaxies and galaxies at higher redshifts are brighter at 1.1 mm. Our field contains z ~ 2.5 H-alpha emitters and a bright single-dish source. However, we do not find evidence of bias in our results caused by the bright source. By combining the fluxes of sources detected by ALMA and fluxes of faint sources detected with stacking, we recover a 1.1 mm surface brightness of up to 20.3 +/- 1.2 Jy/deg, comparable to the extragalactic background light measured by COBE. Based on the fractions of optically faint sources in our and previous ALMA studies and the COBE measurements, we find that approximately half of the cosmic star formation may be obscured by dust and missed by deep optical surveys, Much deeper and wider ALMA imaging is therefore needed to better constrain the obscured cosmic star formation history.
  • Submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) are among the most luminous dusty galaxies in the Universe, but their true nature remains unclear; are SMGs the progenitors of the massive elliptical galaxies we see in the local Universe, or are they just a short-lived phase among more typical star-forming galaxies? To explore this problem further, we investigate the clustering of SMGs identified in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. We use a catalogue of submillimetre ($850\mu$m) source identifications derived using a combination of radio counterparts and colour/IR selection to analyse a sample of 914 SMGs in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS), making this the largest high redshift sample of these galaxies to date. Using angular cross-correlation techniques, we estimate the halo masses for this large sample of SMGs and compare them with passive and star-forming galaxies selected in the same field. We find that SMGs, on average, occupy high-mass dark matter halos (M$_{\text{halo}} >10^{13}$M$_{\odot}$) at redshifts $z > 2.5$, consistent with being the progenitors of massive quiescent galaxies in present-day galaxy clusters. We also find evidence of downsizing, in which SMG activity shifts to lower mass halos at lower redshifts. In terms of their clustering and halo masses, SMGs appear to be consistent with other star-forming galaxies at a given redshift.
  • We present a multi-wavelength analysis of five submillimeter sources (S_1.1mm = 0.54-2.02 mJy) that were detected during our 1.1-mm-deep continuum survey in the SXDF-UDS-CANDELS field (2 arcmin^2, 1sigma = 0.055 mJy beam^-1) using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The two brightest sources correspond to a known single-dish (AzTEC) selected bright submillimeter galaxy (SMG), whereas the remaining three are faint SMGs newly uncovered by ALMA. If we exclude the two brightest sources, the contribution of the ALMA-detected faint SMGs to the infrared extragalactic background light is estimated to be ~ 4.1^{+5.4}_{-3.0} Jy deg^{-2}, which corresponds to ~ 16^{+22}_{-12}% of the infrared extragalactic background light. This suggests that their contribution to the infrared extragalactic background light is as large as that of bright SMGs. We identified multi-wavelength counterparts of the five ALMA sources. One of the sources (SXDF-ALMA3) is extremely faint in the optical to near-infrared region despite its infrared luminosity (L_IR ~ 1e12 L_sun or SFR ~ 100 M_sun yr^{-1}). By fitting the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) at the optical-to-near-infrared wavelengths of the remaining four ALMA sources, we obtained the photometric redshifts (z_photo) and stellar masses (M_*): z_photo ~ 1.3-2.5, M_* ~ (3.5-9.5)e10 M_sun. We also derived their star formation rates (SFRs) and specific SFRs (sSFRs) as ~ 30-200 M_sun yr^{-1} and ~ 0.8-2 Gyr^{-1}, respectively. These values imply that they are main-sequence star-forming galaxies.
  • We study the extent to which very bright (-23.0 < MUV < -21.75) Lyman-break selected galaxies at redshifts z~7 display detectable Lya emission. To explore this issue, we have obtained follow-up optical spectroscopy of 9 z~7 galaxies from a parent sample of 24 z~7 galaxy candidates selected from the 1.65 sq.deg COSMOS-UltraVISTA and SXDS-UDS survey fields using the latest near-infrared public survey data, and new ultra-deep Subaru z'-band imaging (which we also present and describe in this paper). Our spectroscopy has yielded only one possible detection of Lya at z=7.168 with a rest-frame equivalent width EW_0 = 3.7 (+1.7/-1.1) Angstrom. The relative weakness of this line, combined with our failure to detect Lya emission from the other spectroscopic targets allows us to place a new upper limit on the prevalence of strong Lya emission at these redshifts. For conservative calculation and to facilitate comparison with previous studies at lower redshifts, we derive a 1-sigma upper limit on the fraction of UV bright galaxies at z~7 that display EW_0 > 50 Angstrom, which we estimate to be < 0.23. This result may indicate a weak trend where the fraction of strong Lya emitters ceases to rise, and possibly falls between z~6 and z~7. Our results also leave open the possibility that strong Lya may still be more prevalent in the brightest galaxies in the reionization era than their fainter counterparts. A larger spectroscopic sample of galaxies is required to derive a more reliable constraint on the neutral hydrogen fraction at z~7 based on the Lya fraction in the bright galaxies.
  • We report 1.1 mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously-detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive number counts in the flux range of 0.2-2 mJy by using 23 (>=4sigma) sources detected in a continuous 2.0 arcmin$^2$ area of the SXDF. The number counts are consistent with previous results within errors, suggesting that the counts derived from serendipitously-detected sources are not significantly biased, although there could be field-to-field variation due to the small survey area. By using the best-fit function of the number counts, we find that ~40% of the extragalactic background light at 1.1 mm is resolved at S(1.1mm) > 0.2 mJy.
  • We present a new, robust measurement of the evolving rest-frame UV galaxy luminosity function (LF) over the key redshift range z = 2 - 4. Our results are based on the high dynamic range provided by combining the HUDF, CANDELS/GOODS-South, and UltraVISTA/COSMOS surveys. We utilise the unparalleled multi-frequency photometry available in this survey `wedding cake' to compile complete galaxy samples at z ~ 2,3,4 via photometric redshifts (calibrated against the latest spectroscopy) rather than colour-colour selection, and to determine accurate rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes from SED fitting. Our new determinations of the UV LF extend from M_{1500} ~ -22 down to M_{1500} = -14.5, -15.5 and -16 at z ~ 2, 3 and 4 respectively (thus reaching ~ 3 - 4 magnitudes fainter than previous blank-field studies at z ~ 2 - 3). At z ~ 2 - 3 we find a much shallower faint-end slope (alpha = -1.32 +- 0.03) than the steeper values (alpha ~ -1.7) reported by Reddy & Steidel (2009) or by Alavi et al. (2014), and show that this new measurement is robust. By z ~ 4 the faint-end slope has steepened slightly, to alpha = -1.43 +- 0.04, and we show that these measurements are consistent with the overall evolutionary trend from z = 0 to z = 8. Finally, we find that while characteristic number density (phi*) drops from z ~ 2 to z ~ 4, characteristic luminosity (M*) brightens by ~ 1 mag over this redshift range. This, combined with the new flatter faint-end slopes, has the consequence that UV luminosity density (and hence unobscured star-formation density) peaks at z ~ 2.5 - 3, when the Universe was ~ 2.5 Gyr old.
  • We present new results on the evolution of the cosmic star formation rate as a function of stellar mass in the SXDS-UDS field. We make use of narrow-band selected emission line galaxies in four redshift slices between z = 1.46 and z = 0.63, and compute stellar masses by fitting a series of templates to recreate each galaxy's star formation history. We determine mass-binned luminosity functions in each redshift slice, and derive the star formation rate density (rhoSFR) as a function of mass using the [OIII] or [OII] emission lines. We calculate dust extinction and metallicity as a function of stellar mass, and investigate the effect of these corrections on the shape of the overall rhoSFR(M). We find that both these corrections are crucial for determining the shape of the rhoSFR(M), and its evolution with redshift. The fully corrected rhoSFR(M) is a relatively flat distribution, with the normalisation moving towards lower values of rhoSFR with increasing cosmic time/decreasing redshift, and requiring star formation to be truncated across all masses studied here. The peak of rhoSFR(M) is found in the 10^10.5<Msun<10^11.0 mass bin at z = 1.46. In the lower redshift slices the location of the peak is less certain, however low mass galaxies in the range 10^7.0<Msun<10^8.0 play an important part in the overall rhoSFR(M) out to at least z ~ 1.2.
  • We present first results from the SXDF-ALMA 1.5 arcmin^2 deep survey at 1.1 mm using Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The map reaches a 1sigma depth of 55 uJy/beam and covers 12 Halpha-selected star-forming galaxies at z = 2.19 or z=2.53. We have detected continuum emission from three of our Halpha-selected sample, including one compact star-forming galaxy with high stellar surface density, NB2315-07. They are all red in the rest-frame optical and have stellar masses of log (M*/Msun)>10.9 whereas the other blue, main-sequence galaxies with log(M*/Msun)=10.0-10.8 are exceedingly faint, <290 uJy (2sigma upper limit). We also find the 1.1 mm-brightest galaxy, NB2315-02, to be associated with a compact (R_e=0.7+-0.1 kpc), dusty star-forming component. Given high gas fraction (44^{+20}_{-8}% or 37^{+25}_{-3}%) and high star formation rate surface density (126^{+27}_{-30} Msun yr^{-1}kpc^{-2}), the concentrated starburst can within less than 50^{+12}_{-11} Myr build up a stellar surface density matching that of massive compact galaxies at z~2, provided at least 19+-3% of the total gas is converted into stars in the galaxy centre. On the other hand, NB2315-07, which already has such a high stellar surface density core, shows a gas fraction (23+-8%) and is located in the lower envelope of the star formation main-sequence. This compact less star-forming galaxy is likely to be in an intermediate phase between compact dusty star-forming and quiescent galaxies.
  • We present a robust measurement and analysis of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function at z=4-8. We use deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging over the CANDELS/GOODS fields, the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and the Year 1 Hubble Frontier Field deep parallel observations. These surveys provides an effective volume of 0.6-1.2 x 10^6 Mpc^3 over this epoch, allowing us to perform a robust search for faint (M_UV=-18) and bright (M_UV < -21) galaxies. We select candidate galaxies using a well-tested photometric redshift technique with careful screening of contaminants, finding a sample of 7446 galaxies at 3.5<z<8.5, with >1000 galaxies at z~6-8. We measure the luminosity function using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis to measure robust uncertainties. At the faint end our results agree with previous studies, yet we find a higher abundance of UV-bright galaxies at z>6, with M* ~ -21 at z>5, different than that inferred based on previous trends at lower redshift. At z=8, a single power-law provides an equally good fit to the UV luminosity function, while at z=6 and 7, an exponential cutoff at the bright-end is moderately preferred. We compare to semi-analytical models, and find that the lack of evolution in M* is consistent with models where the impact of dust attenuation on the bright-end of the luminosity function decreases at higher redshift. We measure the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate density, correcting for dust attenuation, and find that it declines as (1+z)^(-4.3 +/- 0.5) at z>4, consistent with observations at z>9. Our observations are consistent with a reionization history that starts at z>10, completes at z>6, and reaches a midpoint (x_HII = 0.5) at 6.7<z<9.4. Finally, our observations predict that the abundance of bright z=9 galaxies is likely higher than previous constraints, though consistent with recent estimates of bright z~10 galaxies. [abridged]
  • We present the results of a new search for galaxies at redshift z ~ 9 in the first two Hubble Frontier Fields with completed HST WFC3/IR and ACS imaging. To ensure robust photometric redshift solutions, and to minimize incompleteness, we confine our search to objects with H_{160} < 28.6 (AB mag), consider only image regions with an rms noise sigma_{160} > 30 mag (within a 0.5-arcsec diameter aperture), and insist on detections in both H_{160} and J_{140}. The result is a survey covering an effective area (after accounting for magnification) of 10.9 sq. arcmin, which yields 12 galaxies at 8.4 < z < 9.5. Within the Abell-2744 cluster and parallel fields we confirm the three brightest objects reported by Ishigaki et al. (2014), but recover only one of the four z > 8.4 sources reported by Zheng et al. (2014). In the MACSJ0416.1-240 cluster field we report five objects, and explain why each of these eluded detection or classification as z ~ 9 galaxies in the published searches of the shallower CLASH data. Finally, we uncover four z ~ 9 galaxies from the previously unsearched MACSJ0416.1-240 parallel field. Based on the published magnification maps we find that only one of these 12 galaxies is likely boosted by more than a factor of two by gravitational lensing. Consequently we are able to perform a fairly straightforward reanalysis of the normalization of the z ~ 9 UV galaxy luminosity function as explored previously in the HUDF12 programme. We conclude that the new data strengthen the evidence for a continued smooth decline in UV luminosity density (and hence star-formation rate density) from z ~ 8 to z ~ 9, contrary to recent reports of a marked drop-off at these redshifts. This provides further support for the scenario in which early galaxy evolution is sufficiently extended to explain cosmic reionization.
  • We discuss new constraints on the epoch of cosmic reionization and test the assumption that most of the ionizing photons responsible arose from high redshift star-forming galaxies. Good progress has been made in charting the end of reionization through spectroscopic studies of z~6-8 QSOs, gamma-ray bursts and galaxies expected to host Lyman-alpha emission. However, the most stringent constraints on its duration have come from the integrated optical depth, tau, of Thomson scattering to the cosmic microwave background. Using the latest data on the abundance and luminosity distribution of distant galaxies from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we simultaneously match the reduced value tau=0.066 +/- 0.012 recently reported by the Planck collaboration and the evolving neutrality of the intergalactic medium with a reionization history within 6 <~ z <~ 10, thereby reducing the requirement for a significant population of very high redshift (z>>10) galaxies. Our analysis strengthens the conclusion that star-forming galaxies dominated the reionization process and has important implications for upcoming 21cm experiments and searches for early galaxies with James Webb Space Telescope.
  • Using the UltraVISTA catalogs, we investigate the evolution in the 11.4~Gyr since $z=3$ of the progenitors of local ultra-massive galaxies ($\log{(M_{\rm star}/M_{\odot})}\approx11.8$; UMGs), providing a complete and consistent picture of how the most massive galaxies at $z=0$ have assembled. By selecting the progenitors with a semi-empirical approach using abundance matching, we infer a growth in stellar mass of 0.56$^{+0.35}_{-0.25}$ dex, 0.45$^{+0.16}_{-0.20}$~dex, and 0.27$^{+0.08}_{-0.12}$ dex from $z=3$, $z=2$, and $z=1$, respectively, to $z=0$. At $z<1$, the progenitors of UMGs constitute a homogeneous population of only quiescent galaxies with old stellar populations. At $z>1$, the contribution from star-forming galaxies progressively increases, with the progenitors at $2<z<3$ being dominated by massive ($M_{\rm star} \approx 2 \times 10^{11}$M$_{\odot}$), dusty ($A_{\rm V}\sim$1--2.2 mag), star-forming (SFR$\sim$100--400~M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$) galaxies with a large range in stellar ages. At $z=2.75$, $\sim$15\% of the progenitors are quiescent, with properties typical of post-starburst galaxies with little dust extinction and strong Balmer break, and showing a large scatter in color. Our findings indicate that at least half of the stellar content of local UMGs was assembled at $z>1$, whereas the remaining was assembled via merging from $z\sim 1$ to the present. Most of the quenching of the star-forming progenitors happened between $z=2.75$ and $z=1.25$, in good agreement with the typical formation redshift and scatter in age of $z=0$ UMGs as derived from their fossil records. The progenitors of local UMGs, including the star-forming ones, never lived on the blue cloud since $z=3$. We propose an alternative path for the formation of local UMGs that refines previously proposed pictures and that is fully consistent with our findings.
  • Submillimetre (submm) galaxies are among the most rapidly star-forming and most massive high-redshift galaxies; thus, their properties provide important constraints on galaxy evolution models. However, there is still a debate about their stellar masses and their nature in the context of the general galaxy population. To test the reliability of their stellar mass determinations, we used a sample of simulated submm galaxies for which we derived stellar masses via spectral energy distribution (SED) modelling (with Grasil, Magphys, Hyperz and LePhare) adopting various star formation histories (SFHs). We found that the assumption of SFHs with two independent components leads to the most accurate stellar masses. Exponentially declining SFHs (tau) lead to lower masses (albeit still consistent with the true values), while the assumption of single-burst SFHs results in a significant mass underestimation. Thus, we conclude that studies based on the higher masses inferred from fitting the SEDs of real submm galaxies with double SFHs are most likely to be correct, implying that submm galaxies lie on the high-mass end of the main sequence of star-forming galaxies. This conclusion appears robust to assumptions of whether or not submm galaxies are driven by major mergers, since the suite of simulated galaxies modelled here contains examples of both merging and isolated galaxies. We identified discrepancies between the true and inferred stellar ages (rather than the dust attenuation) as the primary determinant of the success/failure of the mass recovery. Regardless of the choice of SFH, the SED-derived stellar masses exhibit a factor of ~2 scatter around the true value; this scatter is an inherent limitation of the SED modelling due to simplified assumptions. Finally, we found that the contribution of active galactic nuclei does not have any significant impact on the derived stellar masses.
  • We report Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) 1.1 mm continuum imaging towards two extremely red H-[4.5]>4 (AB) galaxies at z>3, which we have previously discovered making use of Spitzer SEDS and Hubble Space Telescope CANDELS ultra-deep images of the Ultra Deep Survey field. One of our objects is detected on the PdBI map with a 4.3 sigma significance, corresponding to Snu(1.1mm)=(0.78 +/- 0.18) mJy. By combining this detection with the Spitzer 8 and 24 micron photometry for this source, and SCUBA2 flux density upper limits, we infer that this galaxy is a composite active galactic nucleus/star-forming system. The infrared (IR)-derived star formation rate is SFR~(200 +/- 100) Msun/yr, which implies that this galaxy is a higher-redshift analogue of the ordinary ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) more commonly found at z~2-3. In the field of the other target, we find a tentative 3.1 sigma detection on the PdBI 1.1 mm map, but 3.7 arcsec away of our target position, so it likely corresponds to a different object. In spite of the lower significance, the PdBI detection is supported by a close SCUBA2 3.3 sigma detection. No counterpart is found on either the deep SEDS or CANDELS maps, so, if real, the PdBI source could be similar in nature to the sub-millimetre source GN10. We conclude that the analysis of ultra-deep near- and mid-IR images offers an efficient, alternative route to discover new sites of powerful star formation activity at high redshifts.
  • We mapped five massive star forming regions with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Temperature and column density maps are obtained from the SCUBA-2 450 and 850 $\mu$m images. Most of the dense clumps we find have central temperatures below 20 K with some as cold as 8 K, suggesting that they have no internal heating due to the presence of embedded protostars. This is surprising, because at the high densities inferred from these images and at these low temperatures such clumps should be unstable, collapsing to form stars and generating internal heating. The column densities at the clump centres exceed 10$^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, and the derived peak visual extinction values are from 25-500 mag for $\beta$ = 1.5-2.5, indicating highly opaque centres. The observed cloud gas masses range from $\sim$ 10 to 10$^{3}$ M$_{\odot}$. The outer regions of the clumps follow an $r^{-2.36\pm0.35}$ density distribution and this power-law structure is observed outside of typically 10$^{4}$ AU. All these findings suggest that these clumps are high-mass starless clumps and most likely contain high-mass starless cores.
  • MS$\,$0451.6$-$0305 is a rich galaxy cluster whose strong lensing is particularly prominent at submm wavelengths. We combine new SCUBA-2 data with imaging from Herschel SPIRE and PACS and HST in order to try to understand the nature of the sources being lensed. In the region of the "giant submm arc," we uncover seven multiply imaged galaxies (up from the previously known three), of which six are found to be at a redshift of $z\sim2.9$, and possibly constitute an interacting system. Using a novel forward-modelling approach, we are able to simultaneously deblend and fit SEDs to the individual galaxies that contribute to the giant submm arc, constraining their dust temperatures, far infrared luminosities and star formation rates. The submm arc first identified by SCUBA can now be seen to be composed of at least five distinct sources, four of these within the galaxy group at $z\sim2.9$. The total unlensed luminosity for this galaxy group is $(3.1\pm0.3) \times 10^{12}\,\mathrm{L}_\odot$, which gives an unlensed star formation rate of $(450\pm50)$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. From the properties of this system, we see no evidence of evolution towards lower temperatures in the dust temperature versus far-infrared luminosity relation for high redshift galaxies.
  • We present a UV-to-mid infrared multi-wavelength catalog in the CANDELS/GOODS-S field, combining the newly obtained CANDELS HST/WFC3 F105W, F125W, and F160W data with existing public data. The catalog is based on source detection in the WFC3 F160W band. The F160W mosaic includes the data from CANDELS deep and wide observations as well as previous ERS and HUDF09 programs. The mosaic reaches a 5$\sigma$ limiting depth (within an aperture of radius 0.17 arcsec) of 27.4, 28.2, and 29.7 AB for CANDELS wide, deep, and HUDF regions, respectively. The catalog contains 34930 sources with the representative 50% completeness reaching 25.9, 26.6, and 28.1 AB in the F160W band for the three regions. In addition to WFC3 bands, the catalog also includes data from UV (U-band from both CTIO/MOSAIC and VLT/VIMOS), optical (HST/ACS F435W, F606W, F775W, F814W, and F850LP), and infrared (HST/WFC3 F098M, VLT/ISAAC Ks, VLT/HAWK-I Ks, and Spitzer/IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 $\mu$m) observations. The catalog is validated via stellar colors, comparison with other published catalogs, zeropoint offsets determined from the best-fit templates of the spectral energy distribution of spectroscopically observed objects, and the accuracy of photometric redshifts. The catalog is able to detect unreddened star-forming (passive) galaxies with stellar mass of 10^{10}M_\odot at a 50% completeness level to z$\sim$3.4 (2.8), 4.6 (3.2), and 7.0 (4.2) in the three regions. As an example of application, the catalog is used to select both star-forming and passive galaxies at z$\sim$2--4 via the Balmer break. It is also used to study the color--magnitude diagram of galaxies at 0<z<4.
  • We present measurements of the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of star-forming and quiescent galaxies to z = 4 using a sample of 95 675 galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. Sources have been selected from the DR1 UltraVISTA K_{s}-band imaging which covers a unique combination of a wide area (1.62 deg^2), to a significant depth (K_{s,tot} = 23.4). The SMFs of the combined population are in good agreement with previous measurements and show that the stellar mass density of the universe was only 50%, 10% and 1% of its current value at z ~ 0.75, 2.0, and 3.5, respectively. The quiescent population drives most of the overall growth, with the stellar mass density of these galaxies increasing by 2.71^{+0.93}_{-0.22} dex since z = 3.5. At z > 2.5, star-forming galaxies dominate the total SMF at all stellar masses, although a nonzero population of quiescent galaxies persists to z = 4. Comparisons of the K_{s}-selected star-forming galaxy SMFs to UV-selected SMFs at 2.5 < z < 4 show reasonable agreement and suggests UV-selected samples are representative of the majority of the stellar mass density at z > 3.5. We estimate the average mass growth of individual galaxies by selecting galaxies at fixed cumulative number density. The average galaxy with Log(M_{*}/M_{sun}) = 11.5 at z = 0.3 has grown in mass by only 0.2 dex (0.3 dex) since z = 2.0(3.5), whereas those with Log(M_{*}/M_{sun}) = 10.5 have grown by > 1.0 dex since z = 2. At z < 2, the time derivatives of the mass growth are always larger for lower-mass galaxies, which demonstrates that the mass growth in galaxies since that redshift is mass-dependent and primarily bottom-up. Lastly, we examine potential sources of systematic uncertainties on the SMFs and find that those from photo-z templates, SPS modeling, and the definition of quiescent galaxies dominate the total error budget in the SMFs.
  • We use state-of-the-art simulations to explore the physical evolution of galaxies in the first billion years of cosmic time. First, we demonstrate that our model reproduces the basic statistical properties of the observed Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) population at z = 6 - 8, including the evolving ultra-violet (UV) luminosity function (LF), the stellar-mass density (SMD), and the average specific star-formation rates (sSFR) of LBGs with M_{UV} < -18 (AB mag). Encouraged by this success we present predictions for the behaviour of fainter LBGs extending down to M_{UV} <= -15 (as will be probed with the James Webb Space Telescope) and have interrogated our simulations to try to gain insight into the physical drivers of the observed population evolution. We find that mass growth due to star formation in the mass-dominant progenitor builds up about 90% of the total z ~ 6 LBG stellar mass, dominating over the mass contributed by merging throughout this era. Our simulation suggests that the apparent "luminosity evolution" depends on the luminosity range probed: the steady brightening of the bright end of the LF is driven primarily by genuine physical luminosity evolution and arises due to a fairly steady increase in the UV luminosity (and hence star-formation rates) in the most massive LBGs. However, at fainter luminosities the situation is more complex, due in part to the more stochastic star-formation histories of lower-mass objects; at this end, the evolution of the UV LF involves a mix of positive and negative luminosity evolution (as low-mass galaxies temporarily brighten then fade) coupled with both positive and negative density evolution (as new low-mass galaxies form, and other low-mass galaxies are consumed by merging). We also predict the average sSFR of LBGs should rise from sSFR = 4.5 Gyr^-1 at z = 6 to about 11 Gyr^-1 by z = 9.