• Sub-Chandrasekhar CO white dwarfs accreting helium have been considered as candidates for Type Ia supernova(SNIa) progenitors since the early 1980s (helium shell mass $> 0.1 M_\odot $). These models, once detonated did not fit the observed spectra and light curve of typical SNIa observations. New theoretical work examined detonations on much less massive ($< 0.05 M_\odot $) envelopes. They find stable detonations that lead to light curves, spectra and abundances that compare relatively well with the observational data. The exact mechanism leading to the ignition of helium detonation is a key issue, since it is a mandatory first step for the whole scenario. As the flow of the accreted envelope is unstable to convection long before any hydrodynamic phenomena develops, a multidimensional approach is needed in order to study the ignition process. The complex convective reactive flow is challenging to any hydrodynamical solver. To the best of our knowledge, all previous 2D studies ignited the detonation artificially. We present here, for the first time, fully consistent results from two hydrodynamical 2D solvers that adopt two independent accurate schemes. For both solvers an effort was made to overcome the problematics raised by the finite resolution and numerical diffusion by the advective terms. Our best models lead to the ignition of a detonation in a convective cell. Our results are robust and the agreement between the two different numerical approaches is very good.
  • We present here, for the first time, a 2D study of the overshoot convective mechanism in nova outbursts for a wide range of possible compositions of the layer underlying the accreted envelope. Previous surveys studied this mechanism only for solar composition matter accreted on top of carbon oxygen (C-O) white dwarfs. Since, during the runaway, mixing with carbon enhances the hydrogen burning rates dramatically, one should question whether significant enrichment of the ejecta is possible also for other underlying compositions (He, O, Ne, Mg), predicted by stellar evolution models. We simulated several non-carbon cases and found significant amounts of those underlying materials in the ejected hydrogen layer. Despite large differences in rates, time scales and energetics between the cases, our results show that the convective dredge up mechanism predicts significant enrichment in all our non-carbon cases, including helium enrichment in recurrent novae. The results are consistent with observations.
  • Xiaofeng Wang, Lifan Wang, Alexei V. Filippenko, Eddie Baron, Markus Kromer, Dennis Jack, Tianmeng Zhang, Greg Aldering, Pierre Antilogus, David Arnett, Dietrich Baade, Brian J. Barris, Stefano Benetti, Patrice Bouchet, Adam S. Burrows, Ramon Canal, Enrico Cappellaro, Raymond Carlberg, Elisa di Carlo, Peter Challis, Arlin Crotts, John I. Danziger, Massimo Della Valle, Michael Fink, Ryan J. Foley, Claes Fransson, Avishay Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Chris L. Gerardy, Gerson Goldhaber, Mario Hamuy, Wolfgang Hillebrandt, Peter A. Hoeflich, Stephen T. Holland, Daniel E. Holz, John P. Hughes, David J. Jeffery, Saurabh W. Jha, Dan Kasen, Alexei M. Khokhlov, Robert P. Kirshner, Robert Knop, Cecilia Kozma, Kevin Krisciunas, Brian C. Lee, Bruno Leibundgut, Eric J. Lentz, Douglas C. Leonard, Walter H. G. Lewin, Weidong Li, Mario Livio, Peter Lundqvist, Dan Maoz, Thomas Matheson, Paolo Mazzali, Peter Meikle, Gajus Miknaitis, Peter Milne, Stefan Mochnacki, Ken'Ichi Nomoto, Peter E. Nugent, Elaine Oran, Nino Panagia, Saul Perlmutter, Mark M. Phillips, Philip Pinto, Dovi Poznanski, Christopher J. Pritchet, Martin Reinecke, Adam Riess, Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente, Richard Scalzo, Eric M. Schlegel, Brian Schmidt, James Siegrist, Alicia M. Soderberg, Jesper Sollerman, George Sonneborn, Anthony Spadafora, Jason Spyromilio, Richard A. Sramek, Sumner G. Starrfield, Louis G. Strolger, Nicholas B. Suntzeff, Rollin Thomas, John L. Tonry, Amedeo Tornambe, James W. Truran, Massimo Turatto, Michael Turner, Schuyler D. Van Dyk, Kurt Weiler, J. Craig Wheeler, Michael Wood-Vasey, Stan Woosley, Hitoshi Yamaoka
    Feb. 6, 2012 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.HE
    We present ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and photometry of four Type Ia supernovae (SNe 2004dt, 2004ef, 2005M, and 2005cf) obtained with the UV prism of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This dataset provides unique spectral time series down to 2000 Angstrom. Significant diversity is seen in the near maximum-light spectra (~ 2000--3500 Angstrom) for this small sample. The corresponding photometric data, together with archival data from Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope observations, provide further evidence of increased dispersion in the UV emission with respect to the optical. The peak luminosities measured in uvw1/F250W are found to correlate with the B-band light-curve shape parameter dm15(B), but with much larger scatter relative to the correlation in the broad-band B band (e.g., ~0.4 mag versus ~0.2 mag for those with 0.8 < dm15 < 1.7 mag). SN 2004dt is found as an outlier of this correlation (at > 3 sigma), being brighter than normal SNe Ia such as SN 2005cf by ~0.9 mag and ~2.0 mag in the uvw1/F250W and uvm2/F220W filters, respectively. We show that different progenitor metallicity or line-expansion velocities alone cannot explain such a large discrepancy. Viewing-angle effects, such as due to an asymmetric explosion, may have a significant influence on the flux emitted in the UV region. Detailed modeling is needed to disentangle and quantify the above effects.
  • Most of the leading explosion scenarios for Type Ia supernovae involve the nuclear incineration of a white dwarf star through a detonation wave. Several scenarios have been proposed as to how this detonation may actually occur, but the exact mechanism and environment in which it takes place remain unknown. We explore the effects of an off-center initiated detonation on the spatial distribution of the nucleosynthetic yield products in a toy model -- a pre-expanded near Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf. We find that a single-point near edge-lit detonation results in asymmetries in the density and thermal profiles, notably the expansion timescale, throughout the supernova ejecta. We demonstrate that this asymmetry of the thermodynamic trajectories should be common to off-center detonations where a small amount of the star is burned prior to detonation. The sensitivity of the yields on the expansion timescale results in an asymmetric distribution of the elements synthesized as reaction products. We tabulate the shift in the center of mass of the various elements produced in our model supernova and find an odd-even pattern for elements past silicon. Our calculations show that off-center single-point detonations in carbon-oxygen white dwarfs are marked by significant composition asymmetries in their remnants which bear potentially observable signatures in both velocity and coordinate space, including an elemental nickel mass fraction which varies by a factor of two to three from one side of the remnant to the other.
  • Recently several type Ib supernovae (SNe; with the prototypical SN 2005E) have been shown to have atypical properties. These SNe are faint (absolute peak magnitude of ~ -15) and fast SNe that show unique composition. They are inferred to have low ejecta mass (a few tenths of a solar mass) and to be highly enriched in calcium, but poor in silicon elements and nickel. These SNe were therefore suggested to belong to a new class of calcium-rich faint SNe explosions. Their properties were proposed to be the result of helium detonations that may occur on helium accreting white dwarfs. In this paper we theoretically study the scenario of helium detonations, and focus on the results of detonations in accreted helium layers on low mass carbon-oxygen (CO) cores. We present new results from one dimensional simulations of such explosions, including their light curves and spectra. We find that when the density of the helium layer is low enough the helium detonation produces large amounts of intermediate elements, such as calcium and titanium, together with a large amount of unburnt helium. Our results suggest that the properties of calcium-rich faint SNe could indeed be consistent with the helium-detonation scenario on small CO cores. Above a certain density (larger CO cores) the detonation leaves mainly 56Ni and unburnt helium, and the predicted spectrum will unlikely fit the unique features of this class of SNe. Finally, none of our studied models reproduces the bright, fast evolving light curves of another type of peculiar SNe suggested to originate in helium detonations (SNe 1885A, 1939B and 2002bj).
  • We study the initiation of the detonation in the gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Initiation of the detonation occurs spontaneously in a region where the length scale of the temperature gradient extending from a flow (in which carbon burning is already occurring) into unburned fuel is commensurate to the range of critical length scales which have been derived from 1D simulations that resolve the initiation of a detonation. By increasing the maximum resolution in a truncated cone that encompasses this region, beginning somewhat before initiation of the detonation occurs, we successfully simulate in situ the first gradient-initiated detonation in a whole-star simulation. The detonation emerges when a compression wave overruns a pocket of fuel situated in a Kelvin-Helmholtz cusp at the leading edge of the inwardly directed jet of burning carbon. The compression wave pre-conditions the temperature in the fuel in such a way that the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism can operate and a detonation ensues. We explore the dependence of the length scale of the temperature gradient on spatial resolution and discuss the implications for the robustness of this detonation mechanism. We find that the time and the location at which initiation of the detonation occurs varies with resolution. In particular, initiation of a detonation had not yet occurred in our highest resolution simulation by the time we ended the simulation because of the computational demand it required. We suggest that the turbulent shear layer surrounding the inwardly directed jet provides the most favorable physical conditions, and therefore the most likely location, for initiation of a detonation in the GCD model.
  • This white paper, directed to the Stars and Stellar Evolution panel, has three objectives: 1) to provide the Astro2010 Decadal Survey with a vista into the goals of the nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics community; 2) to alert the astronomical community of joint opportunities for discoveries at the interface between nuclear physics and astronomy; and 3) to delineate efforts in nuclear physics and describe the observational and theoretical advances in astrophysics necessary to make progress towards answering the following questions in the Nuclear Science 2007 Long Range Plan: 1) What is the origin and distribution of the elements? 2) What are the nuclear reactions that power stars and stellar explosions? 3) What is the nature of dense matter? The scope of this white paper concerns the specific area of "low energy" nuclear astrophysics. We define this as the area of overlap between astrophysics and the study of nuclear structure and reactions. Of the questions listed above, two -- What is the origin of the elements? and What is the nature of dense matter? -- were specifically listed in the National Academies Study, "Connecting Quarks with the Cosmos".
  • Some explosion models for Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), such as the gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) or the double detonation sub-Chandrasekhar (DDSC) models, rely on the spontaneous initiation of a detonation in the degenerate C/O material of a white dwarf. The length scales pertinent to the initiation of the detonation are notoriously unresolved in multi-dimensional stellar simulations, prompting the use of results of 1D simulations at higher resolution, such as the ones performed for this work, as guidelines for deciding whether or not conditions reached in the higher dimensional full star simulations successfully would lead to the onset of a detonation. Spontaneous initiation relies on the existence of a suitable gradient in self-ignition (induction) times of the fuel, which we set up with a spatially localized non-uniformity of temperature -- a hot spot. We determine the critical (smallest) sizes of such hot spots that still marginally result in a detonation in white dwarf matter by integrating the reactive Euler equations with the hydrodynamics code FLASH. We quantify the dependences of the critical sizes of such hot spots on composition, background temperature, peak temperature, geometry, and functional form of the temperature disturbance, many of which were hitherto largely unexplored in the literature. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of modeling of SNe Ia.
  • Abundances of heavier elements (barium and beyond) in many neutron-capture-element-rich halo stars accurately replicate the solar system r-process pattern. However, abundances of lighter neutron-capture elements in these stars are not consistent with the solar system pattern. These comparisons suggest contributions from two distinct types of r-process synthesis events -- a so called main r-process for the elements above the 2nd r-process peak and a weak r-process for the lighter neutron-capture elements. We have performed r-process theoretical predictions to further explore the implications of the solar and stellar observations. We find that the isotopic composition of barium and the elemental Ba/Eu abundance ratios in r-process-rich low metallicity stars can only be matched by computations in which the neutron densities are in the range 23< log n_n < 28, values typical of the main r-process. For r-process conditions that successfully generate the heavy element pattern extending down to A=135, the relative abundance of I129 produced in this mass region appears to be at least 90% of the observed solar value. Finally, in the neutron number density ranges required for production of the observed solar/stellar 3rd r-process-peak (A~200), the predicted abundances of inter-peak element hafnium (Z=72, A~180) follow closely those of 3rd-peak elements and lead. Hf, observable from the ground and close in mass number to the 3rd r-process-peak elements, might also be utilized as part of a new nuclear chronometer pair, Th/Hf, for stellar age determinations.
  • Al Cameron, who died recently (October 3, 2005) at 80, was one of the giants in astrophysics. His insights were profound and his interests were wide-ranging. Originally trained as a nuclear physicist, he made major contributions in a number of fields, including nuclear reactions in stars, nucleosynthesis, the abundances of the elements in the Solar System, and the origin of the Solar System and the Moon. In 1957, Cameron and, independently, Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle, wrote seminal papers on nuclear astrophysics. Most of our current ideas concerning element formation in stars have followed from those two pioneering and historical works. Al also made many contributions in the field of Solar System physics. Particularly noteworthy in this regard was Cameron's work on the formation of the Moon. Al was also a good friend and mentor of young people. Al Cameron will be missed by many in the community both for his scientific contributions and for his friendship.
  • Neutron stars, with their strong surface gravity, have interestingly short timescales for the sedimentation of heavy elements. Recent observations of unstable thermonuclear burning (observed as X-ray bursts) on the surfaces of slowly accreting neutron stars ($< 0.01$ of the Eddington rate) motivate us to examine how sedimentation of CNO isotopes affects the ignition of these bursts. We further estimate the burst development using a simple one-zone model with a full reaction network. We report a region of mass accretion rates for weak H flashes. Such flashes can lead to a large reservoir of He, the unstable burning of which may explain some observed long bursts (duration $\sim 1000$ s).
  • Neutron stars, with their strong surface gravity, have interestingly short timescales for the sedimentation of heavy elements. Motivated by observations of Type I X-ray bursts from sources with extremely low persistent accretion luminosities, $L_X < 10^{36}\usp\ergspersecond (\simeq 0.01\ensuremath{L_{\mathrm{Edd}}}$), we study how sedimentation affects the distribution of isotopes and the ignition of H and He in the envelope of an accreting neutron star. For local mass accretion rates $\mdot \lesssim 10^{-2}\medd$ (for which the ignition of H is unstable), where $\medd = 8.8\times 10^{4}\nsp\gpscps$, the helium and CNO elements sediment out of the accreted fuel before reaching a temperature where H would ignite. Using one-zone calculations of the thermonuclear burning, we find a range of accretion rates for which the unstable H ignition does not trigger unstable He burning. This range depends on the emergent flux from reactions in the deep neutron star crust; for $F = 0.1\nsp\MeV(\dot{m}/\mb)$, the range is $3\times 10^{-3}\medd\lesssim\mdot\lesssim 10^{-2}\medd$. We speculate that sources accreting in this range will build up a massive He layer that later produces an energetic and long X-ray burst. At mass accretion rates lower than this range, we find that the H flash leads to a strong mixed H/He flash. Surprisingly, even at accretion rates $\mdot \gtrsim 0.1\medd$, although the H and He do not completely segregate, the H abundance at the base of the accumulated layer is still reduced. While following the evolution of the X-ray burst is beyond the scope of this introductory paper, we note that the reduced proton-to-seed ratio favors the production of \iso{12}{C}--an important ingredient for subsequent superbursts.
  • The damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA quasar absorption lines provide powerful probes of the evolution of metals, gas, and stars in galaxies. One major obstacle in trying to understand the evolution of DLAs and sub-DLAs has been the small number of metallicity measurements at z < 1.5, an epoch spanning \~70 % of the cosmic history. In recent surveys with the Hubble Space Telescope and Multiple Mirror Telescope, we have doubled the DLA Zn sample at z < 1.5. Combining our results with those at higher redshifts from the literature, we find that the global mean metallicity of DLAs does not rise to the solar value at low redshifts. These surprising results appear to contradict the near-solar mean metallicity observed for nearby (z ~ 0) galaxies and the predictions of cosmic chemical evolution models based on the global star formation history. Finally, we discuss direct constraints on the star formation rates (SFRs) in the absorber galaxies from our deep Fabry-Perot Ly-alpha imaging study and other emission-line studies in the literature. A large fraction of the observed heavy-element quasar absorbers at 0 < z < 3.4 appear to have SFRs substantially below the global mean SFR, consistent with the low metallicities observed in the spectroscopic studies.
  • Multidimensional reactive flow models of accreted hydrogen rich envelopes on top of degenerate cold white dwarfs are very effective tools for the study of critical, non spherically symmetric, behaviors during the early stages of nova outbursts. Such models can shed light both on the mechanism responsible for the heavy element enrichment observed to characterize nova envelope matter and on the role of perturbations during the early stages of ignition of the runaway. The complexity of convective reactive flow in multi-dimensions makes the computational model itself complex and sensitive to the details of the numerics. In this study, we demonstrate that the imposed outer boundary condition can have a dramatic effect on the solution. Several commonly used choices for the outer boundary conditions are examined. It is shown that the solutions obtained from Lagrangian simulations, where the envelope is allowed to expand and mass is being conserved, are consistent with spherically symmetric solutions. In Eulerian schemes which utilize an outer boundary condition of free outflow, the outburst can be artificially quenched.
  • We present new abundance determinations of neutron-capture elements Ge, Zr, Os, Ir, and Pt in a sample of 11 metal-poor (-3.1 <= [Fe/H] <= -1.6) Galactic halo giant stars, based on Hubble Space Telescope UV and Keck I optical high-resolution spectroscopy. The stellar sample is dominated by r-process-rich stars such as the well-studied CS 22892-052 and bd+173248, but also includes the r-process-poor, bright giant HD 122563. Our results demonstrate that abundances of the 3rd r-process peak elements Os, Ir and Pt in these metal-poor halo stars are very well-correlated among themselves, and with the abundances of the canonical r-process element Eu (determined in other studies), thus arguing for a common origin or site for r-process nucleosynthesis of heavier (Z>56) elements. However, the large (and correlated) scatters of [Eu,Os,Ir,Pt/Fe] suggests that the heaviest neutron-capture r-process elements are not formed in all supernovae. In contrast, the Ge abundances of all program stars track their Fe abundances, very well. An explosive process on iron-peak nuclei (e.g., the alpha-rich freeze-out in supernovae), rather than neutron capture, appears to have been the dominant synthesis mechanism for this element at low metallicities -- Ge abundances seem completely uncorrelated with Eu.
  • Most models of cosmic chemical evolution predict that the mass-weighted mean interstellar metallicity of galaxies should rise with time from a low value $\sim 1/30$ solar at $z \sim 3$ to a nearly solar value at $z = 0$. In the absence of any selection effects, the damped Lyman-alpha absorbers (DLAs) in quasar spectra are expected to show such a rise in global metallicity. However, it has been difficult to determine whether or not DLAs show this effect, primarily because of the very small number of DLA metallicity measurements at low redshifts. In an attempt to put tighter constraints on the low-redshift end of the DLA metallicity-redshift relation, we have observed Zn II and Cr II lines in four DLAs at $0.09 < z < 0.52$, using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These observations have provided the first constraints on Zn abundances in DLAs with $z < 0.4$. In all the three DLAs for which our observations offer meaningful constraints on the metallicity, the data suggest that the metallicities are much lower than the solar value. These results are consistent with recent imaging studies indicating that these DLAs may be associated with dwarf or low surface brightness galaxies. We combine our results with higher redshift data from the literature to estimate the global mean metallicity-redshift relation for DLAs. We find that the global mean metallicity shows at most a slow increase with decreasing redshift. ...(Please see the paper for the complete abstract).
  • We investigate whether a single population of first stars could have influenced both the metal enrichment and reionization of the high-redshift intergalactic medium (IGM), by calculating the generated ionizing radiation per unit metal yield as a function of the metallicity of stellar populations. We examine the relation between the ionizing radiation and carbon created by the first stars, since the evidence for the widespread enrichment of the IGM at redshifts $z$ about 3-4 comes from the detection of C IV absorption. We find that the number of ionizing photons per baryon generated in association with the detected IGM metallicity may well exceed that required for a late hydrogen reionization at $z$ of about 6, by up to a factor of 10-20 for metal-free stars in a present-day initial mass function (IMF). This would be in agreement with similar indications from recent observations of the microwave background and the high-$z$ IGM. In addition, the contribution from intermediate-mass stars to the total metal yield, neglected in past works, substantially impacts such calculations. Lastly, a top-heavy IMF is not necessarily preferred as a more efficient high-$z$ source of ionizing radiation, based on nucleosynthetic arguments in association with a given level of IGM enrichment.
  • We present detailed abundance observations of the metal-poor ([Fe/H] = --2.0) Galactic halo star BD+17 3248. We have detected gold in this star, for the first time in any halo star. We also detected a weak line at 3859.60 A in the spectrum of BD+17 3248 that we tentatively identify with uranium. This would be only the second such detection of this radioactive element in any metal-poor halo stars. Similarly to the case of CS 22892--052, the heavier n-capture elements (Z >= 56) fall on the scaled solar system r-process abundance curve, while the elements with Z = 40--50 in BD+17 3248 fall below that same solar curve. Employing the newly detected Th, U and third r-process peak element (e.g., Pt, Ir) abundances, chronometric age estimates have been made for BD+17 3248. The average value of the various chronometric pairs suggests an age of 13.8 +/- 4 Gyr for this star, consistent, within error limits, with other chronometric age determinations for metal-poor Galactic halo stars.
  • We have combined new high-resolution spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based facilities to make a comprehensive new abundance analysis of the metal-poor, halo star BD +17^\circ 3248. We have detected the third r-process peak elements osmium, platinum, and (for the first time in a metal-poor star) gold, elements whose abundances can only be reliably determined using HST. Our observations illustrate a pattern seen in other similar halo stars with the abundances of the heavier neutron-capture elements, including the third r-process peak elements, consistent with a scaled solar system r-process distribution. The abundances of the lighter neutron-capture elements, including germanium and silver, fall below that same scaled solar r-process curve, a result similar to that seen in the ultra-metal-poor star CS 22892--052. A single site with two regimes or sets of conditions, or perhaps two different sites for the lighter and heavier neutron-capture elements, might explain the abundance pattern seen in this star. In addition we have derived a reliable abundance for the radioactive element thorium. We tentatively identify U II at 3859 A in the spectrum of BD +17^\circ 3248, which makes this the second detection of uranium in a very metal-poor halo star. Our combined observations cover the widest range in proton number (from germanium to uranium) thus far of neutron-capture elements in metal-poor Galactic halo stars. Employing the thorium and uranium abundances in comparison with each other and with several stable elements, we determine an average cosmochronological age for BD +17^\circ 3248 of 13.8 +/- 4 Gyr, consistent with that found for other similar metal-poor halo stars.
  • Recent observations of heavy elements produced by rapid neutron capture (r-process) in the halo have shown a striking and unexpected behavior: within a single star, the relative abundances of r-process elements heavier than Eu are the same as the same as those of solar system matter, while across stars with similar metallicity Fe/H, the r/Fe ratio varies over two orders of magnitude. In this paper we present a simple analytic model which describes a star's abundances in terms of its ``ancestry,'' i.e., the number of nucleosynthesis events (e.g., supernova explosions) which contributed to the star's composition. This model leads to a very simple analytic expression for the abundance scatter versus Fe/H, which is in good agreement with the data and with more sophisticated numerical models. We investigate two classes of scenarios for r-process nucleosynthesis, one in which r-process synthesis events occur in only \sim 4% of supernovae but iron synthesis is ubiquitous, and one in which iron nucleosynthesis occurs in only about 9% of supernovae. (the Wasserburg- Qian model). We find that the predictions in these scenarios are similar for [Fe/H] \ga -2.5, but that these models can be readily distinguished observationally by measuring the dispersion in r/Fe at [Fe/H] \la -3.
  • Deuterium plays a crucial role in testing big-bang nucleosynthesis. Its chemical evolution, while simple (it is burned to $^3$He), is intertwined with the more complicated evolution of $^3$He. Gloeckler \& Geiss' new measurement of the $^3$He abundance and the HST measurement of D, both in the local ISM today, can be compared to the pre-solar nebula abundances of D and $^3$He. Within the uncertainties, the sum of D + $^3$He relative to hydrogen is unchanged. This provides some validation of the cosmological utility of D + $^3$He, first suggested by Yang et al (1984), and further, indicates that over the past 4.5 Gyr there has been at most modest stellar production of $^3$He, in contradiction with stellar modeling, or modest stellar destruction of $^3$He, in contradiction with some ``solar spoons.'' While the earlier Galactic evolution of D + $^3$He cannot be constrained directly, it is expected to be dominated by massive stars, which deplete their $^3$He and produce metals. Based on the Galactic metallicity and the constancy of D + $^3$He over the past 4.5 Gyr, we derive a more empirically based lower bound to the cosmological baryon density; while not dramatically different from the original bound of Yang et al (1984) based on D + $^3$He, it alleviates some of the cosmic tension between the big-bang $^4$He abundance and those of D and $^3$He.
  • The effects of magnetic fields on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis(BBN) have been calculated, and the impact on the abundances of the light elements have been investigated numerically. An upper limit on the strength of primordial magnetic fields compatible with observations of light element abundances has been thus obtained. In the framework of standard BBN theory, the maximum strength of the primordial magnetic fields, on scales greater than $10^4$cm but smaller than the event horizon at the BBN epoch ($\sim 1$ min., $\sim 2\times 10^{12}$cm), is $\le 10^{11}$ Gauss. This limit is shown to allow magnetic fields at the time of recombination no stronger than $\sim 0.1$ gauss on scales $\ge 10^{11}{\rm cm}$. Our results also strongly indicate that, at the BBN epoch, and for field strengths $B\le10^{13}$gauss, the effects of magnetic fields on the primordial abundances of light elements are dominated by effects from reaction rates in the presense of primeval magnetic fields rather than by magnetic density effects on the expansion rate.
  • In this paper, we have derived the the effects of strong magnetic fields ${\bf \vec B}$ on nucleon and particle reaction rates of astrophysical significance. We have explored the sensitivity to the presence of arbitrary degeneracy and polarization. The possible astrophysical applications of our results are discussed.