• Analogously to globular clusters, the dense stellar environment of the Galactic center has been proposed to host a large population of as-yet undetected millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Recently, this hypothesis found support in the analysis of gamma rays from the inner Galaxy seen by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi satellite, which revealed a possible excess of diffuse GeV photons in the inner 15 deg about the Galactic center (Fermi GeV excess). The excess can be interpreted as the collective emission of thousands of MSPs in the Galactic bulge, with a spherical distribution that strongly peaks towards the Galactic center. In order to fully establish the MSP interpretation, it is essential to find corroborating evidence in multi-wavelength searches, most notably through the detection of radio pulsation from individual bulge MSPs. Based on globular cluster observations and the gamma-ray emission from the inner Galaxy, we investigate the prospects for detecting MSPs in the Galactic bulge. While previous pulsar surveys failed to identify this population, we demonstrate that, in the upcoming years, new large-area surveys with focus on regions a few degrees north or south of the Galactic center should lead to the detection of dozens of bulge MSPs. Additionally, we show that, in the near future, deep targeted searches of unassociated Fermi sources should be able to detect the first few MSPs in the bulge. The prospects for these deep searches are enhanced by a tentative gamma-ray/radio correlation that we infer from high-latitude gamma-ray MSPs. Such detections would constitute the first clear discoveries of field MSPs in the Galactic bulge, with far-reaching implications for gamma-ray observations, the formation history of the central Milky Way and strategy optimization for future radio observations.
  • We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest EPTA dataset, which consists of ultra-precise timing data on 41 millisecond pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95\% upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range $6\times 10^{-15}<A<1.5\times10^{-14}$ at $5{\rm nHz}<f<7{\rm nHz}$. This limit varies by a factor of five, depending on the assumed source position, and the most constraining limit is achieved towards the positions of the most sensitive pulsars in the timing array. The most robust upper limit -- obtained via a full Bayesian analysis searching simultaneously over the signal and pulsar noise on the subset of ours six best pulsars -- is $A\approx10^{-14}$. These limits, the most stringent to date at $f<10{\rm nHz}$, exclude the presence of sub-centiparsec binaries with chirp mass $\cal{M}_c>10^9$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 25Mpc, and with $\cal{M}_c>10^{10}$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 1Gpc ($z\approx0.2$). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict $<1\%$ probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA dataset, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA limits on individual CGW have improved by almost an order of magnitude in the last five years. The continuing advances in pulsar timing data acquisition and analysis techniques will allow for strong astrophysical constraints on the population of nearby SMBHBs in the coming years.
  • Current and future astronomical survey facilities provide a remarkably rich opportunity for transient astronomy, combining unprecedented fields of view with high sensitivity and the ability to access previously unexplored wavelength regimes. This is particularly true of LOFAR, a recently-commissioned, low-frequency radio interferometer, based in the Netherlands and with stations across Europe. The identification of and response to transients is one of LOFAR's key science goals. However, the large data volumes which LOFAR produces, combined with the scientific requirement for rapid response, make automation essential. To support this, we have developed the LOFAR Transients Pipeline, or TraP. The TraP ingests multi-frequency image data from LOFAR or other instruments and searches it for transients and variables, providing automatic alerts of significant detections and populating a lightcurve database for further analysis by astronomers. Here, we discuss the scientific goals of the TraP and how it has been designed to meet them. We describe its implementation, including both the algorithms adopted to maximize performance as well as the development methodology used to ensure it is robust and reliable, particularly in the presence of artefacts typical of radio astronomy imaging. Finally, we report on a series of tests of the pipeline carried out using simulated LOFAR observations with a known population of transients.
  • Eclipsing millisecond pulsars in close ($P_b < 1$~day) binary systems provide a different view of pulsar winds and shocks than do isolated pulsars. Since 2009, the numbers of these systems known in the Galactic field has increased enormously. We have been systematically studying many of these newly discovered systems at multiple wavelengths. Typically, the companion is nearly Roche-lobe filling and heated by the pulsar which drives mass loss from the companion. The pulsar wind shocks with this material just above the surface of the companion. We discuss various observational properties of this shock, including radio eclipses, orbitally modulated X-ray emission, and the potential for $\gamma$-ray emission. Redbacks, whose companions are likely non-degenerate and significantly more massive, generally have more luminous shocks than black widows which have very low mass companions. This is expected since the more massive redback companions intercept a greater fraction of the pulsar wind. We also compare these systems to accreting millisecond pulsars, which may be progenitors of black widows and in some cases can pass back and forth between redback and accretion phases.
  • We have used the Green Bank Telescope at 350MHz to search 50 faint, unidentified Fermi Gamma-ray sources for radio pulsations. So far, these searches have resulted in the discovery of 10 millisecond pulsars, which are plausible counterparts to these unidentified Fermi sources. Here we briefly describe this survey and the characteristics of the newly discovered MSPs.
  • We present a phase-coherent timing analysis of the intermittent accreting millisecond pulsar SAX J1748.9-2021. A new timing solution for the pulsar spin period and the Keplerian binary orbital parameters was achieved by phase connecting all episodes of intermittent pulsations visible during the 2001 outburst. We investigate the pulse profile shapes, their energy dependence and the possible influence of Type I X-ray bursts on the time of arrival and fractional amplitude of the pulsations. We find that the timing solution of SAX J1748.9-2021 shows an erratic behavior when selecting different subsets of data, that is related to substantial timing noise in the timing post-fit residuals. The pulse profiles are very sinusoidal and their fractional amplitude increases linearly with energy and no second harmonic is detected. The reason why this pulsar is intermittent is still unknown but we can rule out a one-to-one correspondence between Type I X-ray bursts and the appearance of the pulsations.
  • We have discovered a 716-Hz eclipsing binary radio pulsar in the globular cluster Terzan 5 using the Green Bank Telescope. It is the fastest-spinning neutron star ever found, breaking the 23-year-old record held by the 642-Hz pulsar B1937+21. The difficulty in detecting this pulsar, due to its very low flux density and high eclipse fraction (~40% of the orbit), suggests that even faster-spinning neutron stars exist. If the pulsar has a mass less than 2 Msun, then its radius is constrained by the spin rate to be < 16 km. The short period of this pulsar also constrains models that suggest gravitational radiation, through an r-mode instability, limits the maximum spin frequency of neutron stars.
  • A remarkable number of pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) are coincident with EGRET gamma-ray sources. X-ray and radio imaging studies of unidentified EGRET sources have resulted in the discovery of at least 6 new pulsar wind nebulae (PWN). Stationary PWN (SPWN) appear to be associated with steady EGRET sources with hard spectra, typical for gamma-ray pulsars. Their toroidal morphologies can help determine the geometry of the pulsar which is useful for constraining models of pulsed gamma-ray emission. Rapidly moving PWN (RPWN) with more cometary morphologies seem to be associated with variable EGRET sources in regions where the ambient medium is dense compared to what is typical for the ISM.
  • We are conducting deep searches for radio pulsations at L-band (~ 20cm) towards more than 30 globular clusters using the 305m Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico and the 100m Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia. With roughly three quarters of our search data analyzed, we have discovered 12 new millisecond pulsars, 11 of which are in binary systems, and at least three of which eclipse. We have timing solutions for several of these systems.
  • The COS B high energy gamma-ray source 2CG 075+00, also known as GeV J2020+3658 or 3EG J2021+3716, has avoided identification with a low energy counterpart for over twenty years. We present a likely identification with the discovery and subsequent timing of a young and energetic pulsar, PSR J2021+3651, with the Wideband Arecibo Pulsar Processor at the Arecibo Observatory. PSR J2021+3651 has a rotation period P = 104ms and Pdot = 9.6 x 10^{-14}, implying a characteristic age T_c = 17kyr and a spin-down luminosity Edot = 3.4 x 10^{36} erg s^{-1}. The pulsar is also coincident with the ASCA source AX J2021.1+3651. The implied luminosity of the associated X-ray source suggests the X-ray emission is dominated by a pulsar wind nebula unresolved by ASCA. The pulsar's unexpectedly high dispersion measure DM = 371 pc cm^{-3} and the d > 10kpc DM distance pose a new question: is PSR J2021+3651 an extremely efficient gamma-ray pulsar at the edge of the Galaxy? This is a question for AGILE and GLAST to answer.
  • We report on a deep search for radio pulsations toward five unidentified ASCA X-ray sources coincident with EGRET gamma-ray sources. This search has led to the discovery of a young and energetic pulsar using data obtained with the new Wideband Arecibo Pulsar Processor. PSR J2021+3651 is likely associated with the X-ray source AX J2021.1+3651, which in turn is likely associated with the COS B high energy gamma-ray source 2CG 075+00, also known as GeV J2020+3658 or 3EG J2021+3716. PSR J2021+3651 has a rotation period P = 104 ms and P_dot = 9.6x10^{-14}, implying a characteristic age ~17 kyr and a spin-down luminosity E_dot ~ 3.4x10^{36}ergs/s. The dispersion measure DM ~ 371 pc cm^{-3} is by far the highest of any observed pulsar in the Galactic longitude range 55 < l < 80. This DM suggests a distance d > 10 kpc, and a high gamma-ray efficiency of \~15%, but the true distance may be closer if there is a significant contribution to the DM from excess gas in the Cygnus region. The implied luminosity of the associated X-ray source suggests the X-ray emission is dominated by a pulsar wind nebula unresolved by ASCA.