• We study the following one-way asymmetric transmission problem, also a variant of model-based compressed sensing: a resource-limited encoder has to report a small set $S$ from a universe of $N$ items to a more powerful decoder (server). The distinguishing feature is asymmetric information: the subset $S$ is comprised of i.i.d. samples from a prior distribution $\mu$, and $\mu$ is only known to the decoder. The goal for the encoder is to encode $S$ obliviously, while achieving the information-theoretic bound of $|S| \cdot H(\mu)$, i.e., the Shannon entropy bound. We first show that any such compression scheme must be {\em randomized}, if it gains non-trivially from the prior $\mu$. This stands in contrast to the symmetric case (when both the encoder and decoder know $\mu$), where the Huffman code provides a near-optimal deterministic solution. On the other hand, a rather simple argument shows that, when $|S|=k$, a random linear code achieves near-optimal communication rate of about $k\cdot H(\mu)$ bits. Alas, the resulting scheme has prohibitive decoding time: about ${N\choose k} \approx (N/k)^k$. Our main result is a computationally efficient and linear coding scheme, which achieves an $O(\lg\lg N)$-competitive communication ratio compared to the optimal benchmark, and runs in $\text{poly}(N,k)$ time. Our "multi-level" coding scheme uses a combination of hashing and syndrome-decoding of Reed-Solomon codes, and relies on viewing the (unknown) prior $\mu$ as a rather small convex combination of uniform ("flat") distributions.
  • Full-duplex (FD) wireless is an attractive communication paradigm with high potential for improving network capacity and reducing delay in wireless networks. Despite significant progress on the physical layer development, the challenges associated with developing medium access control (MAC) protocols for heterogeneous networks composed of both legacy half-duplex (HD) and emerging FD devices have not been fully addressed. Therefore, we focus on the design and performance evaluation of scheduling algorithms for infrastructure-based heterogeneous networks (composed of HD and FD users). We develop the hybrid Greedy Maximal Scheduling (H-GMS) algorithm, which is tailored to the special characteristics of such heterogeneous networks and combines both centralized GMS and decentralized Q-CSMA mechanisms. Moreover, we prove that H-GMS is throughput-optimal. We then demonstrate by simple examples the benefits of adding FD nodes to a network. Finally, we evaluate the performance of H-GMS and its variants in terms of throughput, delay, and fairness between FD and HD users via extensive simulations. We show that in heterogeneous HD-FD networks, H-GMS achieves 5-10x better delay performance and improves fairness between HD and FD users by up to 50% compared with the fully decentralized Q-CSMA algorithm.
  • In data-parallel computing frameworks, intermediate parallel data is often produced at various stages which needs to be transferred among servers in the datacenter network (e.g. the shuffle phase in MapReduce). A stage often cannot start or be completed unless all the required data pieces from the preceding stage are received. \emph{Coflow} is a recently proposed networking abstraction to capture such communication patterns. We consider the problem of efficiently scheduling coflows with release dates in a shared datacenter network so as to minimize the total weighted completion time of coflows. Several heuristics have been proposed recently to address this problem, as well as a few polynomial-time approximation algorithms with provable performance guarantees. Our main result in this paper is a polynomial-time deterministic algorithm that improves the prior known results. Specifically, we propose a deterministic algorithm with approximation ratio of $5$, which improves the prior best known ratio of $12$. For the special case when all coflows are released at time zero, our deterministic algorithm obtains approximation ratio of $4$ which improves the prior best known ratio of $8$. The key ingredient of our approach is an improved linear program formulation for sorting the coflows followed by a simple list scheduling policy. Extensive simulation results, using both synthetic and real traffic traces, are presented that verify the performance of our algorithm and show improvement over the prior approaches.
  • Wireless object tracking applications are gaining popularity and will soon utilize emerging ultra-low-power device-to-device communication. However, severe energy constraints require much more careful accounting of energy usage than what prior art provides. In particular, the available energy, the differing power consumption levels for listening, receiving, and transmitting, as well as the limited control bandwidth must all be considered. Therefore, we formulate the problem of maximizing the throughput among a set of heterogeneous broadcasting nodes with differing power consumption levels, each subject to a strict ultra-low-power budget. We obtain the oracle throughput (i.e., maximum throughput achieved by an oracle) and use Lagrangian methods to design EconCast - a simple asynchronous distributed protocol in which nodes transition between sleep, listen, and transmit states, and dynamically change the transition rates. EconCast can operate in groupput or anyput modes to respectively maximize two alternative throughput measures. We show that EconCast approaches the oracle throughput. The performance is also evaluated numerically and via extensive simulations and it is shown that EconCast outperforms prior art by 6x - 17x under realistic assumptions. Moreover, we evaluate EconCast's latency performance and consider design tradeoffs when operating in groupput and anyput modes. Finally, we implement EconCast using the TI eZ430-RF2500-SEH energy harvesting nodes and experimentally show that in realistic environments it obtains 57% - 77% of the achievable throughput.
  • Content Delivery Networks (CDNs) deliver a majority of the user-requested content on the Internet, including web pages, videos, and software downloads. A CDN server caches and serves the content requested by users. Designing caching algorithms that automatically adapt to the heterogeneity, burstiness, and non-stationary nature of real-world content requests is a major challenge and is the focus of our work. While there is much work on caching algorithms for stationary request traffic, the work on non-stationary request traffic is very limited. Consequently, most prior models are inaccurate for production CDN traffic that is non-stationary. We propose two TTL-based caching algorithms and provide provable guarantees for content request traffic that is bursty and non-stationary. The first algorithm called d-TTL dynamically adapts a TTL parameter using a stochastic approximation approach. Given a feasible target hit rate, we show that the hit rate of d-TTL converges to its target value for a general class of bursty traffic that allows Markov dependence over time and non-stationary arrivals. The second algorithm called f-TTL uses two caches, each with its own TTL. The first-level cache adaptively filters out non-stationary traffic, while the second-level cache stores frequently-accessed stationary traffic. Given feasible targets for both the hit rate and the expected cache size, f-TTL asymptotically achieves both targets. We implement d-TTL and f-TTL and evaluate both algorithms using an extensive nine-day trace consisting of 500 million requests from a production CDN server. We show that both d-TTL and f-TTL converge to their hit rate targets with an error of about 1.3%. But, f-TTL requires a significantly smaller cache size than d-TTL to achieve the same hit rate, since it effectively filters out the non-stationary traffic for rarely-accessed objects.
  • Motivated by emerging big streaming data processing paradigms (e.g., Twitter Storm, Streaming MapReduce), we investigate the problem of scheduling graphs over a large cluster of servers. Each graph is a job, where nodes represent compute tasks and edges indicate data-flows between these compute tasks. Jobs (graphs) arrive randomly over time, and upon completion, leave the system. When a job arrives, the scheduler needs to partition the graph and distribute it over the servers to satisfy load balancing and cost considerations. Specifically, neighboring compute tasks in the graph that are mapped to different servers incur load on the network; thus a mapping of the jobs among the servers incurs a cost that is proportional to the number of "broken edges". We propose a low complexity randomized scheduling algorithm that, without service preemptions, stabilizes the system with graph arrivals/departures; more importantly, it allows a smooth trade-off between minimizing average partitioning cost and average queue lengths. Interestingly, to avoid service preemptions, our approach does not rely on a Gibbs sampler; instead, we show that the corresponding limiting invariant measure has an interpretation stemming from a loss system.
  • In this paper we look at content placement in the high-dimensional regime: there are n servers, and O(n) distinct types of content. Each server can store and serve O(1) types at any given time. Demands for these content types arrive, and have to be served in an online fashion; over time, there are a total of O(n) of these demands. We consider the algorithmic task of content placement: determining which types of content should be on which server at any given time, in the setting where the demand statistics (i.e. the relative popularity of each type of content) are not known a-priori, but have to be inferred from the very demands we are trying to satisfy. This is the high- dimensional regime because this scaling (everything being O(n)) prevents consistent estimation of demand statistics; it models many modern settings where large numbers of users, servers and videos/webpages interact in this way. We characterize the performance of any scheme that separates learning and placement (i.e. which use a portion of the demands to gain some estimate of the demand statistics, and then uses the same for the remaining demands), showing it is order-wise strictly suboptimal. We then study a simple adaptive scheme - which myopically attempts to store the most recently requested content on idle servers - and show it outperforms schemes that separate learning and placement. Our results also generalize to the setting where the demand statistics change with time. Overall, our results demonstrate that separating the estimation of demand, and the subsequent use of the same, is strictly suboptimal.
  • We use fluid limits to explore the (in)stability properties of wireless networks with queue-based random-access algorithms. Queue-based random-access schemes are simple and inherently distributed in nature, yet provide the capability to match the optimal throughput performance of centralized scheduling mechanisms in a wide range of scenarios. Unfortunately, the type of activation rules for which throughput optimality has been established, may result in excessive queue lengths and delays. The use of more aggressive/persistent access schemes can improve the delay performance, but does not offer any universal maximum-stability guarantees. In order to gain qualitative insight and investigate the (in)stability properties of more aggressive/persistent activation rules, we examine fluid limits where the dynamics are scaled in space and time. In some situations, the fluid limits have smooth deterministic features and maximum stability is maintained, while in other scenarios they exhibit random oscillatory characteristics, giving rise to major technical challenges. In the latter regime, more aggressive access schemes continue to provide maximum stability in some networks, but may cause instability in others. Simulation experiments are conducted to illustrate and validate the analytical results.
  • It is by now well-known that wireless networks with file arrivals and departures are stable if one uses alpha-fair congestion control and back-pressure based scheduling and routing. In this paper, we examine whether ?alpha-fair congestion control is necessary for flow-level stability. We show that stability can be ensured even with very simple congestion control mechanisms, such as a fixed window size scheme which limits the maximum number of packets that are allowed into the ingress queue of a flow. A key ingredient of our result is the use of the difference between the logarithms of queue lengths as the link weights. This result is reminiscent of results in the context of CSMA algorithms, but for entirely different reasons.
  • The process by which new ideas, innovations, and behaviors spread through a large social network can be thought of as a networked interaction game: Each agent obtains information from certain number of agents in his friendship neighborhood, and adapts his idea or behavior to increase his benefit. In this paper, we are interested in how opinions, about a certain topic, form in social networks. We model opinions as continuous scalars ranging from 0 to 1 with 1(0) representing extremely positive(negative) opinion. Each agent has an initial opinion and incurs some cost depending on the opinions of his neighbors, his initial opinion, and his stubbornness about his initial opinion. Agents iteratively update their opinions based on their own initial opinions and observing the opinions of their neighbors. The iterative update of an agent can be viewed as a myopic cost-minimization response (i.e., the so-called best response) to the others' actions. We study whether an equilibrium can emerge as a result of such local interactions and how such equilibrium possibly depends on the network structure, initial opinions of the agents, and the location of stubborn agents and the extent of their stubbornness. We also study the convergence speed to such equilibrium and characterize the convergence time as a function of aforementioned factors. We also discuss the implications of such results in a few well-known graphs such as Erdos-Renyi random graphs and small-world graphs.
  • Recently, it has been shown that CSMA algorithms which use queue length-based link weights can achieve throughput optimality in wireless networks. In particular, a key result by Rajagopalan, Shah, and Shin (2009) shows that, if the link weights are chosen to be of the form log(log(q)) (where q is the queue-length), then throughput optimality is achieved. In this paper, we tighten their result by showing that throughput optimality is preserved even with weight functions of the form log(q)/g(q), where g(q) can be a function that increases arbitrarily slowly. The significance of the result is due to the fact that weight functions of the form log(q)/g(q) seem to achieve the best delay performance in practice.