• YFeO$_3$ and LaFeO$_3$ are members of the rare-earth orthoferrites family with \textit{Pbnm} space group. Using inelastic neutron scattering, the low-energy spin excitations have been measured around magnetic Brillouin zone center. Splitting of magnon branches and non-zero magnon gap is observed for both compounds, which is similar to the behavior observed in multiferroic BiFeO$_3$. Spin wave calculations which include both Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interactions and single-ion anisotropy in the spin-Hamiltonian comprehensively accounts for all the experimentally observed features. Our results offer insight into the unifying physics underlying the Fe$^{3+}$-based perovskites as well as their distinguishing characteristics.
  • Non-collinear two-dimensional triangular lattice antiferromagnets (2D TLAF) are currently an area of very active research due to their unique magnetic properties, which lead to non-trivial quantum effects that experimentally manifest themselves in the spin excitation spectra. Recent examples of such insulating 2D TLAF include (Y,Lu)MnO$_3$, LiCrO$_2$, and CuCrO$_2$. Hexagonal LuFeO3 is a recently synthesized 2D TLAF which exhibits properties of an ideal multiferroic material, partially because of the high spin ($S=5/2$) and strong magnetic super-exchange interactions. We report the full range of spin dynamics in a bulk single crystal of (Lu$_{0.6}$Sc$_{0.4}$)FeO$_3$ (Sc doping to stabilize the hexagonal structure) measured via time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering, and compare and contrast these results with those found experimentally in $h$-LuMnO$_3$ and theoretically for $h$-LuFeO$_3$ via DFT calculations.
  • We report a neutron scattering study of the metallic triangular lattice antiferromagnet PdCrO$_2$. Powder neutron diffraction measurements confirm that the crystalline space group symmetry remains $R\bar{3}m$ below $T_N$. This implies that magnetic interactions consistent with the crystal symmetry do not stabilise the non-coplanar magnetic structure which was one of two structures previously proposed on the basis of single crystal neutron diffraction measurements. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements find two gaps at low energies which can be explained as arising from a dipolar-type exchange interaction. This symmetric anisotropic interaction also stabilises a magnetic structure very similar to the coplanar magnetic structure which was also suggested by the single crystal diffraction study. The higher energy magnon dispersion can be modelled by linear spin wave theory with exchange interactions up to sixth nearest-neighbors, but discrepancies remain which hint at additional effects unexplained by the linear theory.
  • The interplay of charge, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom in matter leads to various forms of ordered states through phase transitions. An important subclass of these phenomena of complex materials is charge ordering (CO), mainly driven by mixed-valence states. We discovered by combining the results of electrical resistivity ($\rho$), specific heat, susceptibility $\chi$ (\textit{T}), and single crystal x-ray diffraction (SC-XRD) that Na$_{2.7}$Ru$_4$O$_9$ with the monoclinic tunnel type lattice (space group $C$2/$m$) exhibits an unconventional CO at room temperature while retaining metallicity. The temperature-dependent SC-XRD results show successive phase transitions with super-lattice reflections at \textbf{q}$_1$=(0, $\frac{1}{2}$, 0) and \textbf{q}$_2$=(0, $\frac{1}{3}$, $\frac{1}{3}$) below $T_{\textrm{C2}}$ (365 K) and only at \textbf{q}$_1$=(0, $\frac{1}{2}$, 0) between $T_{\textrm{C2}}$ and $T_{\textrm{C1}}$ (630 K). We interpreted these as an evidence for the formation of an unconventional CO. It reveals a strong first-order phase transition in the electrical resistivity at $T_{\textrm{C2}}$ (cooling) = 345 K and $T_{\textrm{C2}}$ (heating) = 365 K. We argue that the origin of the phase transition is due to the localized 4$d$ Ru-electrons. The results of our finding reveal an unique example of Ru$^{3+}$/Ru$^{4+}$ mixed valance heavy \textit{d}$^4$ ions.
  • We report the magnetic excitation spectrum as measured by inelastic neutron scattering for a polycrystalline sample of Sr$_3$CuPtO$_6$. Modeling the data by the 2+4 spinon contributions to the dynamical susceptibility within the chains, and with interchain coupling treated in the random phase approximation, accounts for the major features of the powder-averaged structure factor. The magnetic excitations broaden considerably as temperature is raised, persisting up to above 100 K and displaying a broad transition as previously seen in the susceptibility data. No spin gap is observed in the dispersive spin excitations at low momentum transfer, which is consistent with the gapless spinon continuum expected from the coordinate Bethe ansatz. However, the temperature dependence of the excitation spectrum gives evidence of some very weak interchain coupling.
  • Most interesting phenomena of condensed matter physics originate from interactions among different degrees of freedom, making it a very intriguing yet challenging question how certain ground states emerge from only a limited number of atoms in assembly. This is especially the case for strongly correlated electron systems with overwhelming complexity. The Verwey transition of Fe3O4 is a classic example of this category, of which the origin is still elusive 80 years after the first report. Here we report, for the first time, that the Verwey transition of Fe3O4 nanoparticles exhibits size-dependent thermal hysteresis in magnetization, 57Fe NMR, and XRD measurements. The hysteresis width passes a maximum of 11 K when the size is 120 nm while dropping to only 1 K for the bulk sample. This behavior is very similar to that of magnetic coercivity and the critical sizes of the hysteresis and the magnetic single domain are identical. We interpret it as a manifestation of charge ordering and spin ordering correlation in a single domain. This work paves a new way of undertaking researches in the vibrant field of strongly correlated electron physics combined with nanoscience.
  • Hexagonal manganites are multiferroic materials with two highly-dissimilar phase transitions: a ferroelectric transition (from P63/mmc to P63cm) at a temperature higher than 1000 K and an antiferromagnetic transition at TN=65 - 130 K. Despite its critical relevance to the intriguing ferroelectric domain physics, the details of the ferroelectric transition are yet not well known to date primarily because of the ultra-high transition temperature. Using high-temperature X-ray diffraction experiments, we show that the ferroelectric transition is a single transition of abrupt order and R-Op displacement is the primary order parameter. This structural transition is then simultaneously accompanied by MnO5 tilting and the subsequent development of electric polarization.
  • We investigated the topological property of magnon bands in the collinear magnetic orders of zigzag and stripy phases for the antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice and identified Berry curvature and symmetry constraints on the magnon band structure. Different symmetries of both zigzag and stripy phases lead to different topological properties, in particular, the magnon bands of the stripy phase being disentangled with a finite Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) term with non-zero spin Chern number. This is corroborated by calculating the spin Nernst effect. Our study establishes the existence of the non-trivial magnon band topology for all observed collinear antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice in the presence of the DM term.
  • New frustrated antiferromagnetic compounds CuRE2Ge2O8 (RE=Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu) have been investigated using high-resolution x-ray diffraction, magnetic and heat capacity measurements. These systems show different magnetic lattices depending on rare-earth element. The nonmagnetic Eu compound is a S=1/2 two-dimensional triangular antiferromagnetic lattice oriented in the ac plane with geometrical frustration. On the other hand, the Pr, Nd, and Sm compounds show a three-dimensional honeycomb-tunnel-like lattice made of RE^3+ running along the a axis with the characteristic behavior of frustrated antiferromagnets.
  • The strange electronic state of a class of materials which violates the predictions of conventional Fermi-liquid theory of metals remains enigmatic. Proximity to a quantum critical point is a possible origin of this non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behavior, which is usually accomplished by tuning the ground state with non-thermal control parameters such as chemical composition, magnetic field or pressure. We present the spin dynamics study of a stoichiometric NFL system CeRhBi, using low-energy inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and muon spin relaxation (muSR) measurements. It shows evidence for an energy-temperature (E/T) scaling in the INS dynamic response and a time-field scaling of the muSR asymmetry function indicating a quantum critical behavior in this compound. The E/T scaling reveals a local character of quantum criticality consistent with the power-law divergence of the magnetic susceptibility, logarithmic divergence of the magnetic heat capacity and T-linear resistivity at low temperature. The NFL behavior and local criticality occur over a very wide dynamical range at zero field and ambient pressure without any tuning in this stoichiometric heavy fermion compound is striking, making CeRhBi an exemplary model system amenable to in-depth studies for quantum criticality.
  • We present the ultra-low-temperature thermal conductivity measurements on single crystals of the prototypical charge-density-wave material 1$T$-TaS$_2$, which was recently argued to be a candidate for quantum spin liquid. Our experiments show that the residual linear term of thermal conductivity at zero field is essentially zero, within the experimental accuracy. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity is found to be insensitive to the magnetic field up to 9 T. These results clearly demonstrate the absence of itinerant magnetic excitations with fermionic statistics in bulk 1$T$-TaS$_2$ and, thus, put a strong constraint on the theories of the ground state of this material.
  • Strong charge-spin coupling is found in a layered transition-metal trichalcogenide NiPS3, a van derWaals antiferromagnet, from our study of the electronic structure using several experimental and theoretical tools: spectroscopic ellipsometry, x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy, and density-functional calculations. NiPS3 displays an anomalous shift in the optical spectral weight at the magnetic ordering temperature, reflecting a strong coupling between the electronic and magnetic structures. X-ray absorption, photoemission and optical spectra support a self-doped ground state in NiPS3. Our work demonstrates that layered transition-metal trichalcogenide magnets are a useful candidate for the study of correlated-electron physics in two-dimensional magnetic material.
  • A prototypical quasi-2D metallic compound, 1T-TaS_2 has been extensively studied due to an intricate interplay between a Mott-insulating ground state and a charge density-wave (CDW) order. In the low-temperature phase, 12 out of 13 Ta_{4+} 5\textit{d}-electrons form molecular orbitals in hexagonal star-of-David patterns, leaving one 5\textit{d}-electron with \textit{S} = 1/2 spin free. This orphan quantum spin with a large spin-orbit interaction is expected to form a highly correlated phase of its own. And it is most likely that they will form some kind of a short-range order out of a strongly spin-orbit coupled Hilbert space. In order to investigate the low-temperature magnetic properties, we performed a series of measurements including neutron scattering and muon experiments. The obtained data clearly indicate the presence of the short-ranged phase and put the upper bound on ~ 0.4 \textit{\mu}_B for the size of the magnetic moment, consistent with the orphan-spin scenario.
  • We found new two-dimensional (2D) quantum (S=1/2) antiferromagnetic systems: CuRE2Ge2O8 (RE=Y and La). According to our analysis of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments, the Cu-network of CuRE2Ge2O8 (RE=Y and La) exhibits a 2D triangular lattice linked via weak bonds along the perpendicular b-axis. Our bulk characterizations from 0.08 to 400 K show that they undergo a long-range order at 0.51(1) and 1.09(4) K for the Y and La systems, respectively. Interestingly, they also exhibit field induced phase transitions. For theoretical understanding, we carried out the density functional theory (DFT) band calculations to find that they are typical charge-transfer-type insulators with a gap of Eg = 2 eV. Taken together, our observations make CuRE2Ge2O8 (RE=Y and La) additional examples of low-dimensional quantum spin triangular antiferromagnets with the low-temperature magnetic ordering.
  • Hexagonal RMnO3 is a multiferroic compound with a giant spin-lattice coupling at an antiferromagnetic transition temperature [1]. Despite extensive studies over the past two decades, however, the origin and underlying microscopic mechanism of the strong spin-lattice coupling remain still very much elusive. In this study, we have tried to address this problem by measuring the thermal expansion and dielectric constant of doped single crystals Y1-xLuxMnO3 with x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0. From these measurements, we confirm that there is a progressive change in the physical properties with doping. At the same time, all our samples exhibit clear anomalies at TN, even in the samples with x = 0.5 and 0.75 as opposed to some earlier ideas, which suggests an unusual doping dependence of the anomaly. Our work reveals yet another interesting facet of the spin lattice coupling issue in hexagonal RMnO3.
  • CuAl2O4 is a normal spinel oxide having quantum spin, S=1/2 for Cu2+. It is a rather unique feature that the Cu2+ ions of CuAl2O4 sit at a tetrahedral position, not like the usual octahedral position for many oxides. At low temperatures, it exhibits all the thermodynamic evidence of a quantum spin glass. For example, the polycrystalline CuAl2O4 shows a cusp centered at ~2 K in the low-field dc magnetization data and a clear frequency dependence in the ac magnetic susceptibility while it displays logarithmic relaxation behavior in a time dependence of the magnetization. At the same time, there is a peak at ~2.3 K in the heat capacity, which shifts towards higher temperature with magnetic fields. On the other hand, there is no evidence of new superlattice peaks in the high-resolution neutron powder diffraction data when cooled from 40 to 0.4 K. This implies that there is no long-ranged magnetic order down to 0.4 K, thus confirming a spin glass-like ground state for CuAl2O4. Interestingly, there is no sign of structural distortion either although Cu2+ is a Jahn-Teller active ion. Thus, we claim that an orbital liquid state is the most likely ground state in CuAl2O4. Of further interest, it also exhibits a large frustration parameter, f = Theta_CW/Tm ~67, one of the largest values reported for spinel oxides. Our observations suggest that CuAl2O4 should be a rare example of a frustrated quantum spin glass with a good candidate for an orbital liquid state.
  • The competition between interactions in frustrated magnets allows a wide variety of new ground states, often exhibiting emergent physics and unique excitations. Expanding the suite of lattices available for study enhances our chances of finding exotic physics. Mn$_2$Sb$_2$O$_7$ forms in a chiral, kagome-based structure in which a fourth member is added to the kagome-plane triangles to form an armchair unit and link adjacent kagome planes. This structural motif may be viewed as intermediate between the triangles of the kagome network and the tetrahedra in the pyrochlore lattice. Mn$_2$Sb$_2$O$_7$ exhibits two distinct magnetic phase transitions, at 11.1 and 14.2K, at least one of which has a weak ferromagnetic component. The magnetic propagation vector does not change through the lower transition, suggesting a metamagnetic transition or a transition involving a multi-component order parameter. Although previously reported in the $P3_121$ space group, Mn$_2$Sb$_2$O$_7$ actually crystallizes in $P2$, which allows ferroelectricity, and we show clear evidence of magnetoelectric coupling indicative of multiferroic order. The quasi-two-dimensional `armchair-kagome' lattice presents a promising platform for probing chiral magnetism and the effect of dimensionality in highly frustrated systems.
  • In frustrated magnetic systems, geometric constraints or the competition amongst interactions introduce extremely high degeneracy and prevent the system from readily selecting a low-temperature ground state. The most frustrated known spin arrangement is on the pyrochlore lattice, but nearly all magnetic pyrochlores have unquenched orbital angular momentum, constraining the spin directions through spin-orbit coupling. Pyrochlore Mn$_2$Sb$_2$O$_7$ is an extremely rare Heisenberg pyrochlore system, with directionally-unconstrained spins and low chemical disorder. We show that it undergoes a spin-glass transition at 5.5K, which is suppressed by disorder arising from Mn vacancies, indicating this ground state to be a direct consequence of the spins' interactions. The striking similarities to $3d$ transition metal pyrochlores with unquenched angular momentum suggests that the low spin-orbit coupling in the $3d$ block makes Heisenberg pyrochlores far more accessible than previously imagined.
  • Magnetism in two-dimensional materials is not only of fundamental scientific interest but also a promising candidate for numerous applications. However, studies so far, especially the experimental ones, have been mostly limited to the magnetism arising from defects, vacancies, edges or chemical dopants which are all extrinsic effects. Here, we report on the observation of intrinsic antiferromagnetic ordering in the two-dimensional limit. By monitoring the Raman peaks that arise from zone folding due to antiferromagnetic ordering at the transition temperature, we demonstrate that FePS3 exhibits an Ising-type antiferromagnetic ordering down to the monolayer limit, in good agreement with the Onsager solution for two-dimensional order-disorder transition. The transition temperature remains almost independent of the thickness from bulk to the monolayer limit with TN ~118 K, indicating that the weak interlayer interaction has little effect on the antiferromagnetic ordering.
  • DyB4 has a two-dimensional Shastry-Sutherland (Sh-S) lattice with strong Ising character of the Dy ions. Despite the intrinsic frustrations, surprisingly, it undergoes two successive transitions: a magnetic ordering at TN = 20K, and a quadrupole ordering at TQ=12.5 K. From high-resolution neutron and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction studies, we have obtained full structural information on this material in all phases, and demonstrate that structural modifications occurring at quadrupolar transition lead to the lifting of frustrations inherent in the Sh-S model. Our study thus provides a complete experimental picture of how the intrinsic frustration of the Sh-S lattice can be lifted by the coupling to quadrupole moments. We show that two other factors, i.e. strong spin-orbit coupling and long-range RKKY interaction in metallic DyB4, play an important role in this behavior.
  • When magnons and phonons, the fundamental quasiparticles of the solid, are coupled to one another, they form a new hybrid quasi-particle, leading to novel phenomena and interesting applications. Despite its wide-ranging importance, however, detailed experimental studies on the underlying Hamiltonian is rare for actual materials. Moreover, the anharmonicity of such magnetoelastic excitations remains largely unexplored although it is essential for a proper understanding of their diverse thermodynamic behaviour as well as intrinsic zero-temperature decay. Here we show that in noncollinear antiferromagnets, a strong magnon-phonon coupling can significantly enhance the anharmonicity, resulting in the creation of magnetoelastic excitations and their spontaneous decay. By measuring the spin waves over the full Brillouin zone and carrying out anharmonic spin wave calculations using a Hamiltonian with an explicit magnon-phonon coupling, we have identified a hybrid magnetoelastic mode in (Y,Lu)MnO3 and quantified its decay rate and the exchange-striction coupling term required to produce it. Our work has wide implications for understanding of the spin-phonon coupling and the resulting excitations of the broad classes of noncollinear magnets.
  • CuCrO2 is a manifestation of a two-dimensional triangular antiferromagnet which exhibits an incommensurate noncollinear magnetic structure similar to a classical 120 degree ordering. Using the inelastic neutron scattering technique, direct evidence of a magnon-phonon coupling in CuCrO2 is revealed via the mixed magnon-phonon character of the excitation mode at 12.5 meV as well as a minimum at the zone boundary. A simple model Hamiltonian that incorporates an exchange striction type magnon-phonon coupling reproduces the observed features accurately. Also, continuum excitations originating from the interaction between quasiparticles are observed with strong intensity at the zone boundary. These features of the magnetic excitations are key to an understanding of the emergent excitations in noncollinear antiferromagnetic compounds.
  • The first known magnetic mineral, magnetite (Fe$_3$O$_4$), has unusual properties which have fascinated mankind for centuries; it undergoes the Verwey transition at $T_{\rm V}$ $\sim$120 K with an abrupt change in structure and electrical conductivity. The mechanism of the Verwey transition however remains contentious. Here we use resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) over a wide temperature range across the Verwey transition to identify and separate out the magnetic excitations derived from nominal Fe$^{2+}$ and Fe$^{3+}$ states. Comparison of the RIXS results with crystal-field multiplet calculations shows that the spin-orbital $dd$ excitons of the Fe$^{2+}$ sites arise from a tetragonal Jahn-Teller active polaronic distortion of the Fe$^{2+}$O$_6$ octahedra. These low-energy excitations, which get weakened for temperatures above 350 K but persist at least up to 550 K, are distinct from optical excitations and best explained as magnetic polarons.
  • We have investigated the tunneling transport of mono- and few-layers of MnPS3 by using conductive atomic force microscopy. Due to the band alignment of indium tin oxide/MnPS3/Pt-Ir tip junction, the key features of both Schottky junction and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling (FNT) were observed for all the samples with varying thickness. Using the FNT model and assuming the effective electron mass (0.5 me) of MnPS3, we estimate the tunneling barrier height to be 1.31 eV and the dielectric breakdown strength as 5.41 MV/cm.
  • There has been a huge increase of interests in two-dimensional van der Waals materials over the past ten years or so with the conspicuous absence of one particular class of materials: magnetic van der Waals systems. In this Viewpoint, we point it out and illustrate how we might be able to benefit from exploring these so-far neglected materials.