• We consider rank-one non-symmetric tensor estimation and derive simple formulas for the mutual information. We start by the order 2 problem, namely matrix factorization. We treat it completely in a simpler fashion than previous proofs using a new type of interpolation method developed in [1]. We then show how to harness the structure in "layers" of tensor estimation in order to obtain a formula for the mutual information for the order 3 problem from the knowledge of the formula for the order 2 problem, still using the same kind of interpolation. Our proof technique straightforwardly generalizes and allows to rigorously obtain the mutual information at any order in a recursive way.
  • Sparse superposition codes, or sparse regression codes, constitute a new class of codes which was first introduced for communication over the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel. It has been shown that such codes are capacity-achieving over the AWGN channel under optimal maximum-likelihood decoding as well as under various efficient iterative decoding schemes equipped with power allocation or spatially coupled constructions. Here, we generalize the analysis of these codes to a much broader setting that includes all memoryless channels. We show, for a large class of memoryless channels, that spatial coupling allows an efficient decoder, based on the generalized approximate message-passing (GAMP) algorithm, to reach the potential (or Bayes optimal) threshold of the underlying (or uncoupled) code ensemble. Moreover, we argue that spatially coupled sparse superposition codes universally achieve capacity under GAMP decoding by showing, through analytical computations, that the error floor vanishes and the potential threshold tends to capacity as one of the code parameter goes to infinity. Furthermore, we provide a closed form formula for the algorithmic threshold of the underlying code ensemble in terms of a Fisher information. Relating an algorithmic threshold to a Fisher information has theoretical as well as practical importance. Our proof relies on the state evolution analysis and uses the potential method developed in the theory of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes and compressed sensing.
  • Generalized linear models (GLMs) arise in high-dimensional machine learning, statistics, communications and signal processing. In this paper we analyze GLMs when the data matrix is random, as relevant in problems such as compressed sensing, error-correcting codes or benchmark models in neural networks. We evaluate the mutual information (or "free entropy") from which we deduce the Bayes-optimal estimation and generalization errors. Our analysis applies to the high-dimensional limit where both the number of samples and the dimension are large and their ratio is fixed. Non-rigorous predictions for the optimal errors existed for special cases of GLMs, e.g. for the perceptron, in the field of statistical physics based on the so-called replica method. Our present paper rigorously establishes those decades old conjectures and brings forward their algorithmic interpretation in terms of performance of the generalized approximate message-passing algorithm. Furthermore, we tightly characterize, for many learning problems, regions of parameters for which this algorithm achieves the optimal performance, and locate the associated sharp phase transitions separating learnable and non-learnable regions. We believe that this random version of GLMs can serve as a challenging benchmark for multi-purpose algorithms. This paper is divided in two parts that can be read independently: The first part (main part) presents the model and main results, discusses some applications and sketches the main ideas of the proof. The second part (supplementary informations) is much more detailed and provides more examples as well as all the proofs.
  • In recent years important progress has been achieved towards proving the validity of the replica predictions for the (asymptotic) mutual information (or "free energy") in Bayesian inference problems. The proof techniques that have emerged appear to be quite general, despite they have been worked out on a case-by-case basis. Unfortunately, a common point between all these schemes is their relatively high level of technicality. We present a new proof scheme that is quite straightforward with respect to the previous ones. We call it the adaptive interpolation method because it can be seen as an extension of the interpolation method developped by Guerra and Toninelli in the context of spin glasses, with an interpolation path that is adaptive. In order to illustrate our method we show how to prove the replica formula for three non-trivial inference problems. The first one is symmetric rank-one matrix estimation (or factorisation), which is the simplest problem considered here and the one for which the method is presented in full details. Then we generalize to symmetric tensor estimation and random linear estimation. We believe that the present method has a much wider range of applicability and also sheds new insights on the reasons for the validity of replica formulas in Bayesian inference.
  • There has been definite progress recently in proving the variational single-letter formula given by the heuristic replica method for various estimation problems. In particular, the replica formula for the mutual information in the case of noisy linear estimation with random i.i.d. matrices, a problem with applications ranging from compressed sensing to statistics, has been proven rigorously. In this contribution we go beyond the restrictive i.i.d. matrix assumption and discuss the formula proposed by Takeda, Uda, Kabashima and later by Tulino, Verdu, Caire and Shamai who used the replica method. Using the recently introduced adaptive interpolation method and random matrix theory, we prove this formula for a relevant large sub-class of rotationally invariant matrices.
  • Consider random linear estimation with Gaussian measurement matrices and noise. One can compute infinitesimal variations of the mutual information under infinitesimal variations of the signal-to-noise ratio or of the measurement rate. We discuss how each variation is related to the minimum mean-square error and deduce that the two variations are directly connected through a very simple identity. The main technical ingredient is a new interpolation method called "sub-extensive interpolation method". We use it to provide a new proof of an I-MMSE relation recently found by Reeves and Pfister [1] when the measurement rate is varied. Our proof makes it clear that this relation is intimately related to another I-MMSE relation also recently proved in [2]. One can directly verify that the identity relating the two types of variation of mutual information is indeed consistent with the one letter replica symmetric formula for the mutual information, first derived by Tanaka [3] for binary signals, and recently proved in more generality in [1,2,4,5] (by independent methods). However our proof is independent of any knowledge of Tanaka's formula.
  • We consider the estimation of a signal from the knowledge of its noisy linear random Gaussian projections. A few examples where this problem is relevant are compressed sensing, sparse superposition codes, and code division multiple access. There has been a number of works considering the mutual information for this problem using the replica method from statistical physics. Here we put these considerations on a firm rigorous basis. First, we show, using a Guerra-Toninelli type interpolation, that the replica formula yields an upper bound to the exact mutual information. Secondly, for many relevant practical cases, we present a converse lower bound via a method that uses spatial coupling, state evolution analysis and the I-MMSE theorem. This yields a single letter formula for the mutual information and the minimal-mean-square error for random Gaussian linear estimation of all discrete bounded signals. In addition, we prove that the low complexity approximate message-passing algorithm is optimal outside of the so-called hard phase, in the sense that it asymptotically reaches the minimal-mean-square error. In this work spatial coupling is used primarily as a proof technique. However our results also prove two important features of spatially coupled noisy linear random Gaussian estimation. First there is no algorithmically hard phase. This means that for such systems approximate message-passing always reaches the minimal-mean-square error. Secondly, in a proper limit the mutual information associated to such systems is the same as the one of uncoupled linear random Gaussian estimation.
  • Sparse superposition (SS) codes were originally proposed as a capacity-achieving communication scheme over the additive white Gaussian noise channel (AWGNC) [1]. Very recently, it was discovered that these codes are universal, in the sense that they achieve capacity over any memoryless channel under generalized approximate message-passing (GAMP) decoding [2], although this decoder has never been stated for SS codes. In this contribution we introduce the GAMP decoder for SS codes, we confirm empirically the universality of this communication scheme through its study on various channels and we provide the main analysis tools: state evolution and potential. We also compare the performance of GAMP with the Bayes-optimal MMSE decoder. We empirically illustrate that despite the presence of a phase transition preventing GAMP to reach the optimal performance, spatial coupling allows to boost the performance that eventually tends to capacity in a proper limit. We also prove that, in contrast with the AWGNC case, SS codes for binary input channels have a vanishing error floor in the limit of large codewords. Moreover, the performance of Hadamard-based encoders is assessed for practical implementations.
  • We study the approximate message-passing decoder for sparse superposition coding on the additive white Gaussian noise channel and extend our preliminary work [1]. We use heuristic statistical-physics-based tools such as the cavity and the replica methods for the statistical analysis of the scheme. While superposition codes asymptotically reach the Shannon capacity, we show that our iterative decoder is limited by a phase transition similar to the one that happens in Low Density Parity check codes. We consider two solutions to this problem, that both allow to reach the Shannon capacity: i) a power allocation strategy and ii) the use of spatial coupling, a novelty for these codes that appears to be promising. We present in particular simulations suggesting that spatial coupling is more robust and allows for better reconstruction at finite code lengths. Finally, we show empirically that the use of a fast Hadamard-based operator allows for an efficient reconstruction, both in terms of computational time and memory, and the ability to deal with very large messages.
  • We consider the estimation of a signal from the knowledge of its noisy linear random Gaussian projections, a problem relevant in compressed sensing, sparse superposition codes or code division multiple access just to cite few. There has been a number of works considering the mutual information for this problem using the heuristic replica method from statistical physics. Here we put these considerations on a firm rigorous basis. First, we show, using a Guerra-type interpolation, that the replica formula yields an upper bound to the exact mutual information. Secondly, for many relevant practical cases, we present a converse lower bound via a method that uses spatial coupling, state evolution analysis and the I-MMSE theorem. This yields, in particular, a single letter formula for the mutual information and the minimal-mean-square error for random Gaussian linear estimation of all discrete bounded signals.
  • Factorizing low-rank matrices has many applications in machine learning and statistics. For probabilistic models in the Bayes optimal setting, a general expression for the mutual information has been proposed using heuristic statistical physics computations, and proven in few specific cases. Here, we show how to rigorously prove the conjectured formula for the symmetric rank-one case. This allows to express the minimal mean-square-error and to characterize the detectability phase transitions in a large set of estimation problems ranging from community detection to sparse PCA. We also show that for a large set of parameters, an iterative algorithm called approximate message-passing is Bayes optimal. There exists, however, a gap between what currently known polynomial algorithms can do and what is expected information theoretically. Additionally, the proof technique has an interest of its own and exploits three essential ingredients: the interpolation method introduced in statistical physics by Guerra, the analysis of the approximate message-passing algorithm and the theory of spatial coupling and threshold saturation in coding. Our approach is generic and applicable to other open problems in statistical estimation where heuristic statistical physics predictions are available.
  • We recently proved threshold saturation for spatially coupled sparse superposition codes on the additive white Gaussian noise channel. Here we generalize our analysis to a much broader setting. We show for any memoryless channel that spatial coupling allows generalized approximate message-passing (GAMP) decoding to reach the potential (or Bayes optimal) threshold of the code ensemble. Moreover in the large input alphabet size limit: i) the GAMP algorithmic threshold of the underlying (or uncoupled) code ensemble is simply expressed as a Fisher information; ii) the potential threshold tends to Shannon's capacity. Although we focus on coding for sake of coherence with our previous results, the framework and methods are very general and hold for a wide class of generalized estimation problems with random linear mixing.
  • Recently, a new class of codes, called sparse superposition or sparse regression codes, has been proposed for communication over the AWGN channel. It has been proven that they achieve capacity using power allocation and various forms of iterative decoding. Empirical evidence has also strongly suggested that the codes achieve capacity when spatial coupling and approximate message passing decoding are used, without need of power allocation. In this note we prove that state evolution (which tracks message passing) indeed saturates the potential threshold of the underlying code ensemble, which approaches in a proper limit the optimal threshold. Our proof uses ideas developed in the theory of low-density parity-check codes and compressive sensing.
  • Reconstruction of images from noisy linear measurements is a core problem in image processing, for which convex optimization methods based on total variation (TV) minimization have been the long-standing state-of-the-art. We present an alternative probabilistic reconstruction procedure based on approximate message-passing, Scampi, which operates in the compressive regime, where the inverse imaging problem is underdetermined. While the proposed method is related to the recently proposed GrAMPA algorithm of Borgerding, Schniter, and Rangan, we further develop the probabilistic approach to compressive imaging by introducing an expectation-maximizaiton learning of model parameters, making the Scampi robust to model uncertainties. Additionally, our numerical experiments indicate that Scampi can provide reconstruction performance superior to both GrAMPA as well as convex approaches to TV reconstruction. Finally, through exhaustive best-case experiments, we show that in many cases the maximal performance of both Scampi and convex TV can be quite close, even though the approaches are a prori distinct. The theoretical reasons for this correspondence remain an open question. Nevertheless, the proposed algorithm remains more practical, as it requires far less parameter tuning to perform optimally.
  • This thesis is interested in the application of statistical physics methods and inference to sparse linear estimation problems. The main tools are the graphical models and approximate message-passing algorithm together with the cavity method. We will also use the replica method of statistical physics of disordered systems which allows to associate to the studied problems a cost function referred as the potential of free entropy in physics. It allows to predict the different phases of typical complexity of the problem as a function of external parameters such as the noise level or the number of measurements one has about the signal: the inference can be typically easy, hard or impossible. We will see that the hard phase corresponds to a regime of coexistence of the actual solution together with another unwanted solution of the message passing equations. In this phase, it represents a metastable state which is not the true equilibrium solution. This phenomenon can be linked to supercooled water blocked in the liquid state below its freezing critical temperature. We will use a method that allows to overcome the metastability mimicing the strategy adopted by nature itself for supercooled water: the nucleation and spatial coupling. In supercooled water, a weak localized perturbation is enough to create a crystal nucleus that will propagate in all the medium thanks to the physical couplings between closeby atoms. The same process will help the algorithm to find the signal, thanks to the introduction of a nucleus containing local information about the signal. It will then spread as a "reconstruction wave" similar to the crystal in the water. After an introduction to statistical inference and sparse linear estimation, we will introduce the necessary tools. Then we will move to applications of these notions to signal processing and coding theory problems.
  • We study the behavior of Approximate Message-Passing, a solver for linear sparse estimation problems such as compressed sensing, when the i.i.d matrices -for which it has been specifically designed- are replaced by structured operators, such as Fourier and Hadamard ones. We show empirically that after proper randomization, the structure of the operators does not significantly affect the performances of the solver. Furthermore, for some specially designed spatially coupled operators, this allows a computationally fast and memory efficient reconstruction in compressed sensing up to the information-theoretical limit. We also show how this approach can be applied to sparse superposition codes, allowing the Approximate Message-Passing decoder to perform at large rates for moderate block length.
  • These are notes from the lecture of R\"udiger Urbanke given at the autumn school "Statistical Physics, Optimization, Inference, and Message-Passing Algorithms", that took place in Les Houches, France from Monday September 30th, 2013, till Friday October 11th, 2013. The school was organized by Florent Krzakala from UPMC and ENS Paris, Federico Ricci-Tersenghi from La Sapienza Roma, Lenka Zdeborov\`a from CEA Saclay and CNRS, and Riccardo Zecchina from Politecnico Torino. The first three sections cover the basics of polar codes and low density parity check codes. In the last three sections, we see how the spatial coupling helps belief propagation decoding.
  • Superposition codes are efficient for the Additive White Gaussian Noise channel. We provide here a replica analysis of the performances of these codes for large signals. We also consider a Bayesian Approximate Message Passing decoder based on a belief-propagation approach, and discuss its performance using the density evolution technic. Our main findings are 1) for the sizes we can access, the message-passing decoder outperforms other decoders studied in the literature 2) its performance is limited by a sharp phase transition and 3) while these codes reach capacity as $B$ (a crucial parameter in the code) increases, the performance of the message passing decoder worsen as the phase transition goes to lower rates.
  • We revisit the classical hard-core model, also known as independent set and dual to vertex cover problem, where one puts particles with a first-neighbor hard-core repulsion on the vertices of a random graph. Although the case of random graphs with small and very large average degrees respectively are quite well understood, they yield qualitatively different results and our aim here is to reconciliate these two cases. We revisit results that can be obtained using the (heuristic) cavity method and show that it provides a closed-form conjecture for the exact density of the densest packing on random regular graphs with degree K>=20, and that for K>16 the nature of the phase transition is the same as for large K. This also shows that the hard-code model is the simplest mean-field lattice model for structural glasses and jamming.
  • We revisit the error correction scheme of real-valued signals when the codeword is corrupted by gross errors on a fraction of entries and a small noise on all the entries. Combining the recent developments of approximate message passing and the spatially-coupled measurement matrix in compressed sensing we show that the error correction and its robustness towards noise can be enhanced considerably. We discuss the performance in the large signal limit using previous results on state evolution, as well as for finite size signals through numerical simulations. Even for relatively small sizes, the approach proposed here outperforms convex-relaxation-based decoders.
  • Compressed sensing is designed to measure sparse signals directly in a compressed form. However, most signals of interest are only "approximately sparse", i.e. even though the signal contains only a small fraction of relevant (large) components the other components are not strictly equal to zero, but are only close to zero. In this paper we model the approximately sparse signal with a Gaussian distribution of small components, and we study its compressed sensing with dense random matrices. We use replica calculations to determine the mean-squared error of the Bayes-optimal reconstruction for such signals, as a function of the variance of the small components, the density of large components and the measurement rate. We then use the G-AMP algorithm and we quantify the region of parameters for which this algorithm achieves optimality (for large systems). Finally, we show that in the region where the GAMP for the homogeneous measurement matrices is not optimal, a special "seeding" design of a spatially-coupled measurement matrix allows to restore optimality.