• We present a multi-wavelength catalog in the Subaru-XMM Deep Field (SXDF) as part of the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH). We include the newly acquired optical data from the Hyper-Suprime Cam Subaru Strategic Program, accompanied by IRAC coverage from the SPLASH survey. All available optical and near-infrared data is homogenized and resampled on a common astrometric reference frame. Source detection is done using a multi-wavelength detection image including the $u$-band to recover the bluest objects. We measure multi-wavelength photometry and compute photometric redshifts as well as stellar masses for $\sim$1.17 million objects over $\sim$4.2 deg$^2$ with $\sim$800,000 objects in the 2.4 deg$^2$ HSC-UltraDeep coverage. Using the available spectroscopic redshifts from various surveys over the range of $0<z<6$, we verify the performance of the photometric redshifts and we find a normalized median absolute deviation of 0.023 and outlier fraction of 3.2%. The SPLASH-SXDF catalog is a valuable, publicly available resource that is perfectly suited for studying galaxies in the early universe and tracing their evolution through cosmic time. The catalog is available for download from https://z.umn.edu/SXDF .
  • We investigate the connection between environment and the different quenching channels that galaxies are prone to follow in the rest-frame NUVrK (i.e., NUV-r vs. r-K) colour diagram, as identified by Moutard et al. (2016b). Namely, the (fast) quenching channel followed by ($young$) low-mass galaxies and the (slow) quenching channel followed by ($old$) high-mass ones. We make use of the >22 deg$^2$ covered the VIPERS Multi-Lambda Survey (VIPERS-MLS) to select a galaxy sample complete down to stellar masses of $M_* > 10^{9.4} M_\odot$ at $z < 0.65$ ($M_* > 10^{8.8} M_\odot$ at $z < 0.5$) and including 33,500 (43,000) quiescent galaxies properly selected at $0.2 < z < 0.65$, while being characterized by reliable photometric redshifts ($\sigma_{\delta z/(1+z)} \leq 0.04$) that we use to measure galaxy local densities. We find that (1) the quiescence of low-mass [$M_* \leq 10^{9.7} M_\odot$] galaxies requires a strong increase of the local density, which confirms the lead role played by environment in their fast quenching and, therefore, confirms that the low-mass upturn observed in the stellar mass function of quiescent galaxies is due to $environmental$ $quenching$. We also observe that (2) the reservoir of low-mass galaxies prone to environmental quenching has grown between $z \sim 0.6$ and $ z \sim 0.4$ whilst the share of low-mass galaxies in the quiescent population may have simultaneously increased, which may be consistent with a rising importance of $environmental$ $quenching$ with cosmic time, compared to $mass$ $quenching$. We finally discuss the composite picture of such environmental quenching of low-mass galaxies and, in particular, how this picture may be consistent with a $delayed$-$then$-$rapid$ quenching scenario.
  • We present and characterize the catalog of galaxy shape measurements that will be used for cosmological weak lensing measurements in the Wide layer of the first year of the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey. The catalog covers an area of 136.9 deg$^2$ split into six fields, with a mean $i$-band seeing of $0.58$ arcsec and $5\sigma$ point-source depth of $i\sim 26$. Given conservative galaxy selection criteria for first year science, the depth and excellent image quality results in unweighted and weighted source number densities of 24.6 and 21.8 arcmin$^{-2}$, respectively. We define the requirements for cosmological weak lensing science with this catalog, then focus on characterizing potential systematics in the catalog using a series of internal null tests for problems with point-spread function (PSF) modeling, shear estimation, and other aspects of the image processing. We find that the PSF models narrowly meet requirements for weak lensing science with this catalog, with fractional PSF model size residuals of approximately $0.003$ (requirement: 0.004) and the PSF model shape correlation function $\rho_1<3\times 10^{-7}$ (requirement: $4\times 10^{-7}$) at 0.5$^\circ$ scales. A variety of galaxy shape-related null tests are statistically consistent with zero, but star-galaxy shape correlations reveal additive systematics on $>1^\circ$ scales that are sufficiently large as to require mitigation in cosmic shear measurements. Finally, we discuss the dominant systematics and the planned algorithmic changes to reduce them in future data reductions.
  • We present a joint X-ray, optical and weak-lensing analysis for X-ray luminous galaxy clusters selected from the MCXC (Meta-Catalog of X-Ray Detected Clusters of Galaxies) cluster catalog in the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) survey field with S16A data, As a pilot study of our planned series papers, we measure hydrostatic equilibrium (H.E.) masses using XMM-Newton data for four clusters in the current coverage area out of a sample of 22 MCXC clusters. We additionally analyze a non-MCXC cluster associated with one MCXC cluster. We show that H.E. masses for the MCXC clusters are correlated with cluster richness from the CAMIRA catalog (Oguri et al. 2017), while that for the non-MCXC cluster deviates from the scaling relation. The mass normalization of the relationship between the cluster richness and H.E. mass is compatible with one inferred by matching CAMIRA cluster abundance with a theoretical halo mass function. The mean gas mass fraction based on H.E. masses for the MCXC clusters is $\langle f_{\rm gas} \rangle = 0.125\pm0.012$ at spherical overdensity $\Delta=500$, which is $\sim80-90$ percent of the cosmic mean baryon fraction, $\Omega_b/\Omega_m$, measured by cosmic microwave background experiments. We find that the mean baryon fraction estimated from X-ray and HSC-SSP optical data is comparable to $\Omega_b/\Omega_m$. A weak-lensing shear catalog of background galaxies, combined with photometric redshifts, is currently available only for three clusters in our sample. Hydrostatic equilibrium masses roughly agree with weak-lensing masses, albeit with large uncertainty. This study demonstrates that further multiwavelength study for a large sample of clusters using X-ray, HSC-SSP optical and weak lensing data will enable us to understand cluster physics and utilize cluster-based cosmology.
  • We present a statistical study of the redshift evolution of the cluster galaxy population over a wide redshift range from 0.1 to 1.1, using $\sim 1900$ optically-selected CAMIRA clusters from $\sim 232$~deg$^2$ of the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Wide S16A data. Our stacking technique with a statistical background subtraction reveals color-magnitude diagrams of red-sequence and blue cluster galaxies down to faint magnitudes of $m_z\sim 24$. We find that the linear relation of red-sequence galaxies in the color-magnitude diagram extends down to the faintest magnitudes we explore with a small intrinsic scatter $\sigma_{\rm int}(g-r)<0.1$. The scatter does not evolve significantly with redshift. The stacked color-magnitude diagrams are used to define red and blue galaxies in clusters for studying their radial number density profiles without resorting to photometric redshifts of individual galaxies. We find that red galaxies are significantly more concentrated toward cluster centers and blue galaxies dominate the outskirt of clusters. We explore the fraction of red galaxies in clusters as a function of redshift, and find that the red fraction decreases with increasing distances from cluster centers. The red fraction exhibits a moderate decrease with increasing redshift. The radial number density profiles of cluster member galaxies are also used to infer the location of the steepest slope in the three dimensional galaxy density profiles. For a fixed threshold in richness, we find little redshift evolution in this location.
  • The possibly unbiased selection process in surveys of the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect can unveil new populations of galaxy clusters. We performed a weak lensing analysis of the PSZ2LenS sample, i.e. the PSZ2 galaxy clusters detected by the Planck mission in the sky portion covered by the lensing surveys CFHTLenS and RCSLenS. PSZ2LenS consists of 35 clusters and it is a statistically complete and homogeneous subsample of the PSZ2 catalogue. The Planck selected clusters appear to be unbiased tracers of the massive end of the cosmological haloes. The mass concentration relation of the sample is in excellent agreement with predictions from the Lambda cold dark matter model. The stacked lensing signal is detected at 14 sigma significance over the radial range 0.1<R<3.2 Mpc/h, and is well described by the cuspy dark halo models predicted by numerical simulations. We confirmed that Planck estimated masses are biased low by b_SZ= 27+-11(stat)+-8(sys) per cent with respect to weak lensing masses. The bias is higher for the cosmological subsample, b_SZ= 40+-14+-(stat)+-8(sys) per cent.
  • We study the UV luminosity functions (LFs) at $z\sim 4$, $5$, $6,$ and $7$ based on the deep large-area optical images taken by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru strategic program (SSP). On the 100 deg$^2$ sky of the HSC SSP data available to date, we make enormous samples consisting of a total of 579,565 dropout candidates at $z\sim 4-7$ by the standard color selection technique, 358 out of which are spectroscopically confirmed by our follow-up spectroscopy and other studies. We obtain UV LFs at $z \sim 4-7$ that span a very wide UV luminosity range of $\sim 0.002 - 100 \, L_{\rm UV}^\ast$ ($-26 < M_{\rm UV} < -14$ mag) by combining LFs from our program and the ultra-deep Hubble Space Telescope legacy surveys. We derive three parameters of the best-fit Schechter function, $\phi^\ast$, $M_{\rm UV}^\ast$, and $\alpha$, of the UV LFs in the magnitude range where the AGN contribution is negligible, and find that $\alpha$ and $\phi^\ast$ decrease from $z\sim 4$ to $7$ with no significant evolution of $M_{\rm UV}^\ast$. Because our HSC SSP data bridge the LFs of galaxies and AGNs with great statistical accuracy, we carefully investigate the bright end of the galaxy UV LFs that are estimated by the subtraction of the AGN contribution either aided with spectroscopy or the best-fit AGN UV LFs. We find that the bright end of the galaxy UV LFs cannot be explained by the Schechter function fits at $> 2 \sigma$ significance, and require either double power-law functions or modified Schechter functions that consider a magnification bias due to gravitational lensing.
  • We present clustering properties from 579,492 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z~4-6 over the 100 deg^2 sky (corresponding to a 1.4 Gpc^3 volume) identified in early data of the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru strategic program survey. We derive angular correlation functions (ACFs) of the HSC LBGs with unprecedentedly high statistical accuracies at z~4-6, and compare them with the halo occupation distribution (HOD) models. We clearly identify significant ACF excesses in 10"<$\theta$<90", the transition scale between 1- and 2-halo terms, suggestive of the existence of the non-linear halo bias effect. Combining the HOD models and previous clustering measurements of faint LBGs at z~4-7, we investigate dark-matter halo mass (Mh) of the z~4-7 LBGs and its correlation with various physical properties including the star-formation rate (SFR), the stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR), and the dark matter accretion rate (dotMh) over a wide-mass range of Mh/M$_\odot$=4x10^10-4x10^12. We find that the SHMR increases from z~4 to 7 by a factor of ~4 at Mh~1x10^11 M$_\odot$, while the SHMR shows no strong evolution in the similar redshift range at Mh~1x10^12 M$_\odot$. Interestingly, we identify a tight relation of SFR/dotMh-Mh showing no significant evolution beyond 0.15 dex in this wide-mass range over z~4-7. This weak evolution suggests that the SFR/dotMh-Mh relation is a fundamental relation in high-redshift galaxy formation whose star formation activities are regulated by the dark matter mass assembly. Assuming this fundamental relation, we calculate the cosmic SFR densities (SFRDs) over z=0-10 (a.k.a. Madau-Lilly plot). The cosmic SFRD evolution based on the fundamental relation agrees with the one obtained by observations, suggesting that the cosmic SFRD increase from z~10 to 4-2 (decrease from z~4-2 to 0) is mainly driven by the increase of the halo abundance (the decrease of the accretion rate).
  • Photometric redshifts are a key component of many science objectives in the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP). In this paper, we describe and compare the codes used to compute photometric redshifts for HSC-SSP, how we calibrate them, and the typical accuracy we achieve with the HSC five-band photometry (grizy). We introduce a new point estimator based on an improved loss function and demonstrate that it works better than other commonly used estimators. We find that our photo-z's are most accurate at 0.2<~zphot<~1.5, where we can straddle the 4000A break. We achieve sigma(d_zphot/(1+zphot))~0.05 and an outlier rate of about 15% for galaxies down to i=25 within this redshift range. If we limit to a brighter sample of i<24, we achieve sigma~0.04 and ~8% outliers. Our photo-z's should thus enable many science cases for HSC-SSP. We also characterize the accuracy of our redshift probability distribution function (PDF) and discover that some codes over/under-estimate the redshift uncertainties, which have implications for N(z) reconstruction. Our photo-z products for the entire area in the Public Data Release 1 are publicly available, and both our catalog products (such as point estimates) and full PDFs can be retrieved from the data release site, https://hsc-release.mtk.nao.ac.jp/.
  • Hiroaki Aihara, Robert Armstrong, Steven Bickerton, James Bosch, Jean Coupon, Hisanori Furusawa, Yusuke Hayashi, Hiroyuki Ikeda, Yukiko Kamata, Hiroshi Karoji, Satoshi Kawanomoto, Michitaro Koike, Yutaka Komiyama, Robert H. Lupton, Sogo Mineo, Hironao Miyatake, Satoshi Miyazaki, Tomoki Morokuma, Yoshiyuki Obuchi, Yukie Oishi, Yuki Okura, Paul A. Price, Tadafumi Takata, Manobu M. Tanaka, Masayuki Tanaka, Yoko Tanaka, Tomohisa Uchida, Fumihiro Uraguchi, Yousuke Utsumi, Shiang-Yu Wang, Yoshihiko Yamada, Hitomi Yamanoi, Naoki Yasuda, Nobuo Arimoto, Masashi Chiba, Francois Finet, Hiroki Fujimori, Seiji Fujimoto, Junko Furusawa, Tomotsugu Goto, Andy Goulding, James E. Gunn, Yuichi Harikane, Takashi Hattori, Masao Hayashi, Krzysztof G. Helminiak, Ryo Higuchi, Chiaki Hikage, Paul T.P. Ho, Bau-Ching Hsieh, Kuiyun Huang, Song Huang, Masatoshi Imanishi, Ikuru Iwata, Anton T. Jaelani, Hung-Yu Jian, Nobunari Kashikawa, Nobuhiko Katayama, Takashi Kojima, Akira Konno, Shintaro Koshida, Haruka Kusakabe, Alexie Leauthaud, C.-H. Lee, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Rachel Mandelbaum, Yoshiki Matsuoka, Elinor Medezinski, Shoken Miyama, Rieko Momose, Anupreeta More, Surhud More, Shiro Mukae, Ryoma Murata, Hitoshi Murayama, Tohru Nagao, Fumiaki Nakata, Hiroko Niikura, Atsushi J. Nishizawa, Masamune Oguri, Nobuhiro Okabe, Yoshiaki Ono, Masato Onodera, Masafusa Onoue, Masami Ouchi, Tae-Soo Pyo, Takatoshi Shibuya, Kazuhiro Shimasaku, Melanie Simet, Joshua Speagle, David N. Spergel, Michael A. Strauss, Yuma Sugahara, Naoshi Sugiyama, Yasushi Suto, Nao Suzuki, Philip J. Tait, Masahiro Takada, Tsuyoshi Terai, Yoshiki Toba, Edwin L. Turner, Hisakazu Uchiyama, Keiichi Umetsu, Yuji Urata, Tomonori Usuda, Sherry Yeh, Suraphong Yuma
    The Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) is a three-layered imaging survey aimed at addressing some of the most outstanding questions in astronomy today, including the nature of dark matter and dark energy. The survey has been awarded 300 nights of observing time at the Subaru Telescope and it started in March 2014. This paper presents the first public data release of HSC-SSP. This release includes data taken in the first 1.7 years of observations (61.5 nights) and each of the Wide, Deep, and UltraDeep layers covers about 108, 26, and 4 square degrees down to depths of i~26.4, ~26.5, and ~27.0 mag, respectively (5sigma for point sources). All the layers are observed in five broad bands (grizy), and the Deep and UltraDeep layers are observed in narrow bands as well. We achieve an impressive image quality of 0.6 arcsec in the i-band in the Wide layer. We show that we achieve 1-2 per cent PSF photometry (rms) both internally and externally (against Pan-STARRS1), and ~10 mas and 40 mas internal and external astrometric accuracy, respectively. Both the calibrated images and catalogs are made available to the community through dedicated user interfaces and database servers. In addition to the pipeline products, we also provide value-added products such as photometric redshifts and a collection of public spectroscopic redshifts. Detailed descriptions of all the data can be found online. The data release website is https://hsc-release.mtk.nao.ac.jp/.
  • We present an optically-selected cluster catalog from the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program. The HSC images are sufficiently deep to detect cluster member galaxies down to $M_*\sim 10^{10.2}M_\odot$ even at $z\sim 1$, allowing a reliable cluster detection at such high redshifts. We apply the CAMIRA algorithm to the HSC Wide S16A dataset covering $\sim 232$ deg$^2$ to construct a catalog of 1921 clusters at redshift $0.1<z<1.1$ and richness $\hat{N}_{\rm mem}>15$ that roughly corresponds to $M_{\rm 200m}\gtrsim 10^{14}h^{-1}M_\odot$. We confirm good cluster photometric redshift performance, with the bias and scatter in $\Delta z/(1+z)$ being better than 0.005 and 0.01 over most of the redshift range, respectively. We compare our cluster catalog with large X-ray cluster catalogs from XXL and XMM-LSS surveys and find good correlation between richness and X-ray properties. We also study the miscentering effect from the distribution of offsets between optical and X-ray cluster centers. We confirm the high ($>0.9$) completeness and purity for high mass clusters by analyzing mock galaxy catalogs.
  • We present the procedure to build and validate the bright-star masks for the Hyper-Suprime-Cam Strategic Subaru Proposal (HSC-SSP) survey. To identify and mask the saturated stars in the full HSC-SSP footprint, we rely on the Gaia and Tycho-2 star catalogues. We first assemble a pure star catalogue down to $G_{\rm Gaia} < 18$ after removing $\sim1.5\%$ of sources that appear extended in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We perform visual inspection on the early data from the S16A internal release of HSC-SSP, finding that our star catalogue is $99.2\%$ pure down to $G_{\rm Gaia} < 18$. Second, we build the mask regions in an automated way using stacked detected source measurements around bright stars binned per $G_{\rm Gaia}$ magnitude. Finally, we validate those masks from visual inspection and comparison with the literature of galaxy number counts and angular two-point correlation functions. This version (Arcturus) supersedes the previous version (Sirius) used in the S16A internal and DR1 public releases. We publicly release the full masks and tools to flag objects in the entire footprint of the planned HSC-SSP observations at this address: ftp://obsftp.unige.ch/pub/coupon/brightStarMasks/HSC-SSP/.
  • In this paper, we describe the optical imaging data processing pipeline developed for the Subaru Telescope's Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) instrument. The HSC Pipeline builds on the prototype pipeline being developed by the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope's Data Management system, adding customizations for HSC, large-scale processing capabilities, and novel algorithms that have since been reincorporated into the LSST codebase. While designed primarily to reduce HSC Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) data, it is also the recommended pipeline for reducing general-observer HSC data. The HSC pipeline includes high level processing steps that generate coadded images and science-ready catalogs as well as low-level detrending and image characterizations.
  • The Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) is an ambitious multi-band survey using the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) on the Subaru telescope. The Wide layer of the SSP is both wide and deep, reaching a detection limit of i~26.0 mag. At these depths, it is challenging to achieve accurate, unbiased, and consistent photometry across all five bands. The HSC data are reduced using a pipeline that builds on the prototype pipeline for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. We have developed a Python-based, flexible framework to inject synthetic galaxies into real HSC images called SynPipe. Here we explain the design and implementation of SynPipe and generate a sample of synthetic galaxies to examine the photometric performance of the HSC pipeline. For stars, we achieve 1% photometric precision at i~19.0 mag and 6% precision at i~25.0 in the i-band. For synthetic galaxies with single-Sersic profiles, forced CModel photometry achieves 13% photometric precision at i~20.0 mag and 18% precision at i~25.0 in the i-band. We show that both forced PSF and CModel photometry yield unbiased color estimates that are robust to seeing conditions. We identify several caveats that apply to the version of HSC pipeline used for the first public HSC data release (DR1) that need to be taking into consideration. First, the degree to which an object is blended with other objects impacts the overall photometric performance. This is especially true for point sources. Highly blended objects tend to have larger photometric uncertainties, systematically underestimated fluxes and slightly biased colors. Second, >20% of stars at 22.5< i < 25.0 mag can be misclassified as extended objects. Third, the current CModel algorithm tends to strongly underestimate the half-light radius and ellipticity of galaxy with i>21.5 mag.
  • We present a list of galaxy-scale lens candidates including a highly probable interacting galaxy-scale lens in the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) imaging survey. We combine HSC imaging with the blended-spectra catalog from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to identify lens candidates, and use lens mass modeling to confirm the candidates. We find 46 matches between the HSC S14A_0b imaging data release and the GAMA catalog. Ten of them are probable lens systems according to their morphology and redshifts. There is one system with an interacting galaxy pair, HSC J084928+000949, that has a valid mass model. We predict the total mass enclosed by the Einstein radius of $\sim0.72$" ($\sim1.65$kpc) for this new expected lens system to be $\sim10^{10.59}M_{\odot}$. Using the photometry in the {\it grizy} bands of the HSC survey and stellar population synthesis modeling with a Salpeter stellar initial mass function, we estimate the stellar mass within the Einstein radius to be $\sim10^{10.46}\,M_{\odot}$. We thus find a dark matter mass fraction within the Einstein radius of $\sim25\%$. Further spectroscopy or high-resolution imaging would allow confirmation of the nature of these lens candidates. The particular system with the interacting galaxy pair, if confirmed, would provide an opportunity to study the interplay between dark matter and stars as galaxies build up through hierarchical mergers.
  • We present the luminosity function of z=4 quasars based on the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program Wide layer imaging data in the g, r, i, z, and y bands covering 339.8 deg^2. From stellar objects, 1666 z~4 quasar candidates are selected by the g-dropout selection down to i=24.0 mag. Their photometric redshifts cover the redshift range between 3.6 and 4.3 with an average of 3.9. In combination with the quasar sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the same redshift range, the quasar luminosity function covering the wide luminosity range of M1450=-22 to -29 mag is constructed. It is well described by a double power-law model with a knee at M1450=-25.36+-0.13 mag and a flat faint-end slope with a power-law index of -1.30+-0.05. The knee and faint-end slope show no clear evidence of redshift evolution from those at z~2. The flat slope implies that the UV luminosity density of the quasar population is dominated by the quasars around the knee, and does not support the steeper faint-end slope at higher redshifts reported at z>5. If we convert the M1450 luminosity function to the hard X-ray 2-10keV luminosity function using the relation between UV and X-ray luminosity of quasars and its scatter, the number density of UV-selected quasars matches well with that of the X-ray-selected AGNs above the knee of the luminosity function. Below the knee, the UV-selected quasars show a deficiency compared to the hard X-ray luminosity function. The deficiency can be explained by the lack of obscured AGNs among the UV-selected quasars.
  • There are well-observed differences between cool-core (CC) and non-cool-core (NCC) clusters, but the origin of this distinction is still largely unknown. Competing theories can be divided into internal (inside-out), in which internal physical processes transform or maintain the NCC phase, and external (outside-in), in which the cluster type is determined by its initial conditions, which in turn lead to different formation histories (i.e., assembly bias). We propose a new method that uses the relative assembly bias of CC to NCC clusters, as determined via the two-point cluster-galaxy cross-correlation function (CCF), to test whether formation history plays a role in determining their nature. We apply our method to 48 ACCEPT clusters, which have well resolved central entropies, and cross-correlate with the SDSS-III/BOSS LOWZ galaxy catalog. We find that the relative bias of NCC over CC clusters is $b = 1.42 \pm 0.35$ ($1.6\sigma$ different from unity). Our measurement is limited by the small number of clusters with core entropy information within the BOSS footprint, 14 CC and 34 NCC. Future compilations of X-ray cluster samples, combined with deep all-sky redshift surveys, will be able to better constrain the relative assembly bias of CC and NCC clusters and determine the origin of the bimodality.
  • Throughout the processing and analysis of survey data, a ubiquitous issue nowadays is that we are spoilt for choice when we need to select a methodology for some of its steps. The alternative methods usually fail and excel in different data regions, and have various advantages and drawbacks, so a combination that unites the strengths of all while suppressing the weaknesses is desirable. We propose to use a two-level hierarchy of learners. Its first level consists of training and applying the possible base methods on the first part of a known set. At the second level, we feed the output probability distributions from all base methods to a second learner trained on the remaining known objects. Using classification of variable stars and photometric redshift estimation as examples, we show that the hierarchical combination is capable of achieving general improvement over averaging-type combination methods, correcting systematics present in all base methods, is easy to train and apply, and thus, it is a promising tool in the astronomical "Big Data" era.
  • Euclid is a Europe-led cosmology space mission dedicated to a visible and near infrared survey of the entire extra-galactic sky. Its purpose is to deepen our knowledge of the dark content of our Universe. After an overview of the Euclid mission and science, this contribution describes how the community is getting organized to face the data analysis challenges, both in software development and in operational data processing matters. It ends with a more specific account of some of the main contributions of the Swiss Science Data Center (SDC-CH).
  • We present measurements of the clustering properties of a sample of infrared (IR) bright dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs). Combining 125 deg$^2$ of wide and deep optical images obtained with the Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope and all-sky mid-IR (MIR) images taken with Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, we have discovered 4,367 IR-bright DOGs with $(i - [22])_{\rm AB}$ $>$ 7.0 and flux density at 22 $\mu$m $>$ 1.0 mJy. We calculate the angular autocorrelation function (ACF) for a uniform subsample of 1411 DOGs with 3.0 mJy $<$ flux (22 $mu$m) $<$ 5.0 mJy and $i_{\rm AB}$ $<$ 24.0. The ACF of our DOG subsample is well-fit with a single power-law, $\omega (\theta)$ = (0.010 $\pm$ 0.003) $\theta^{-0.9}$, where $\theta$ in degrees. The correlation amplitude of IR-bright DOGs is larger than that of IR-faint DOGs, which reflects a flux-dependence of the DOG clustering, as suggested by Brodwin et al. (2008). We assume that the redshift distribution for our DOG sample is Gaussian, and consider 2 cases: (1) the redshift distribution is the same as IR-faint DOGs with flux at 22 $\mu$m $<$ 1.0 mJy, mean and sigma $z$ = 1.99 $\pm$ 0.45, and (2) $z$ = 1.19 $\pm$ 0.30, as inferred from their photometric redshifts. The inferred correlation length of IR-bright DOGs is $r_0$ = 12.0 $\pm$ 2.0 and 10.3 $\pm$ 1.7 $h^{-1}$ Mpc, respectively. IR-bright DOGs reside in massive dark matter halos with a mass of $\log [\langle M_{\mathrm{h}} \rangle / (h^{-1} M_{\odot})]$ = 13.57$_{-0.55}^{+0.50}$ and 13.65$_{-0.52}^{+0.45}$ in the two cases, respectively.
  • We present high signal-to-noise galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements of the BOSS CMASS sample using 250 square degrees of weak lensing data from CFHTLenS and CS82. We compare this signal with predictions from mock catalogs trained to match observables including the stellar mass function and the projected and two dimensional clustering of CMASS. We show that the clustering of CMASS, together with standard models of the galaxy-halo connection, robustly predicts a lensing signal that is 20-40% larger than observed. Detailed tests show that our results are robust to a variety of systematic effects. Lowering the value of $S_{\rm 8}=\sigma_{\rm 8} \sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3}$ compared to Planck2015 reconciles the lensing with clustering. However, given the scale of our measurement ($r<10$ $h^{-1}$ Mpc), other effects may also be at play and need to be taken into consideration. We explore the impact of baryon physics, assembly bias, massive neutrinos, and modifications to general relativity on $\Delta\Sigma$ and show that several of these effects may be non-negligible given the precision of our measurement. Disentangling cosmological effects from the details of the galaxy-halo connection, the effects of baryons, and massive neutrinos, is the next challenge facing joint lensing and clustering analyses. This is especially true in the context of large galaxy samples from Baryon Acoustic Oscillation surveys with precise measurements but complex selection functions.
  • We present stacking analyses on our ALMA deep 1.1 mm imaging in the SXDF using 1.6 {\mu}m and 3.6 {\mu}m selected galaxies in the CANDELS WFC3 catalog. We detect a stacked flux of ~0.03-0.05 mJy, corresponding to LIR < 10^11 Lsun and a star formation rate (SFR) of ~ 15 Msun/yr at z = 2. We find that galaxies brighter in the rest-frame near-infrared tend to be also brighter at 1.1 mm, and galaxies fainter than m[3.6um] = 23 do not produce detectable 1.1 mm emission. This suggests a correlation between stellar mass and SFR, but outliers to this correlation are also observed, suggesting strongly boosted star formation or extremely large extinction. We also find tendencies that redder galaxies and galaxies at higher redshifts are brighter at 1.1 mm. Our field contains z ~ 2.5 H-alpha emitters and a bright single-dish source. However, we do not find evidence of bias in our results caused by the bright source. By combining the fluxes of sources detected by ALMA and fluxes of faint sources detected with stacking, we recover a 1.1 mm surface brightness of up to 20.3 +/- 1.2 Jy/deg, comparable to the extragalactic background light measured by COBE. Based on the fractions of optically faint sources in our and previous ALMA studies and the COBE measurements, we find that approximately half of the cosmic star formation may be obscured by dust and missed by deep optical surveys, Much deeper and wider ALMA imaging is therefore needed to better constrain the obscured cosmic star formation history.
  • We use subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) to model the stellar mass function (SMF) and clustering of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) "CMASS" sample at $z\sim0.5$. We introduce a novel method which accounts for the stellar mass incompleteness of CMASS as a function of redshift, and produce CMASS mock catalogs which include selection effects, reproduce the overall SMF, the projected two-point correlation function $w_{\rm p}$, the CMASS $dn/dz$, and are made publicly available. We study the effects of assembly bias above collapse mass in the context of "age matching" and show that these effects are markedly different compared to the ones explored by Hearin et al. (2013) at lower stellar masses. We construct two models, one in which galaxy color is stochastic ("AbM" model) as well as a model which contains assembly bias effects ("AgM" model). By confronting the redshift dependent clustering of CMASS with the predictions from our model, we argue that that galaxy colors are not a stochastic process in high-mass halos. Our results suggest that the colors of galaxies in high-mass halos are determined by other halo properties besides halo peak velocity and that assembly bias effects play an important role in determining the clustering properties of this sample.
  • We measure the cross-correlation signature between the Planck CMB lensing map and the weak lensing observations from both the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS) and the Canada-France-Hawai Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). In addition to a Fourier analysis, we include the first configuration-space detection, based on the estimators $\langle \kappa_{\rm CMB} \kappa_{\rm gal} \rangle$ and $\langle \kappa_{\rm CMB} \gamma_{t} \rangle$. Combining 747.2 deg$^2$ from both surveys, we find a detection significance that exceeds $4.2\sigma$ in both Fourier- and configuration-space analyses. Scaling the predictions by a free parameter $A$, we obtain $A^{\rm Planck}_{\rm CFHT}= 0.68\pm 0.31 $ and $A^{\rm Planck}_{\rm RCS}= 1.31\pm 0.33$. In preparation for the next generation of measurements similar to these, we quantify the impact of different analysis choices on these results. First, since none of these estimators probes the exact same dynamical range, we improve our detection by combining them. Second, we carry out a detailed investigation on the effect of apodization, zero-padding and mask multiplication, validated on a suite of high-resolution simulations, and find that the latter produces the largest systematic bias in the cosmological interpretation. Finally, we show that residual contamination from intrinsic alignment and the effect of photometric redshift error are both largely degenerate with the characteristic signal from massive neutrinos, however the signature of baryon feedback might be easier to distinguish. The three lensing datasets are now publicly available.
  • We present clustering analysis results from 10,381 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z~ 4-7, identified in the Hubble legacy deep imaging and new complimentary large-area Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam data. We measure the angular correlation functions (ACFs) of these LBGs at z~4, 5, 6, and 7, and fit these measurements using halo occupation distribution (HOD) models that provide an estimate of halo masses, M_h~(1-20)x10^11 Msun. Our M_h estimates agree with those obtained by previous clustering studies in a UV-magnitude vs. M_h plane, and allow us to calculate stellar-to-halo mass ratios (SHMRs) of LBGs. By comparison with the z~0 SHMR, we identify evolution of the SHMR from z~0 to z~4, and z~4 to z~7 at the >98% confidence levels. The SHMR decreases by a factor of ~2 from z~0 to 4, and increases by a factor of ~4 from z~4 to 7. We compare our SHMRs with results of a hydrodynamic simulation and a semi-analytic model, and find that these theoretical studies do not predict the SHMR increase from z~4 to 7. We obtain the baryon conversion efficiency (BCE) of LBGs at z~4, and find that the BCE increases with increasing dark matter halo mass. Finally, we compare our clustering+HOD estimates with results from abundance matching techniques, and conclude that the M_h estimates of the clustering+HOD analyses agree with those of the simple abundance matching within a factor of 3, and that the agreement improves when using more sophisticated abundance matching techniques that include subhalos, incompleteness, and/or evolution in the star formation and stellar mass functions.