• In many scientific and engineering applications, we are tasked with the maximisation of an expensive to evaluate black box function $f$. Traditional settings for this problem assume just the availability of this single function. However, in many cases, cheap approximations to $f$ may be obtainable. For example, the expensive real world behaviour of a robot can be approximated by a cheap computer simulation. We can use these approximations to eliminate low function value regions cheaply and use the expensive evaluations of $f$ in a small but promising region and speedily identify the optimum. We formalise this task as a \emph{multi-fidelity} bandit problem where the target function and its approximations are sampled from a Gaussian process. We develop MF-GP-UCB, a novel method based on upper confidence bound techniques. In our theoretical analysis we demonstrate that it exhibits precisely the above behaviour, and achieves better regret than strategies which ignore multi-fidelity information. Empirically, MF-GP-UCB outperforms such naive strategies and other multi-fidelity methods on several synthetic and real experiments.
  • We develop an automated technique for detecting damped Lyman-$\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs) along spectroscopic lines of sight to quasi-stellar objects (QSOs or quasars). The detection of DLAs in large-scale spectroscopic surveys such as SDSS-III sheds light on galaxy formation at high redshift, showing the nucleation of galaxies from diffuse gas. We use nearly 50 000 QSO spectra to learn a novel tailored Gaussian process model for quasar emission spectra, which we apply to the DLA detection problem via Bayesian model selection. We propose models for identifying an arbitrary number of DLAs along a given line of sight. We demonstrate our method's effectiveness using a large-scale validation experiment, with excellent performance. We also provide a catalog of our results applied to 162 858 spectra from SDSS-III data release 12.
  • The fundamental task of general density estimation $p(x)$ has been of keen interest to machine learning. In this work, we attempt to systematically characterize methods for density estimation. Broadly speaking, most of the existing methods can be categorized into either using: \textit{a}) autoregressive models to estimate the conditional factors of the chain rule, $p(x_{i}\, |\, x_{i-1}, \ldots)$; or \textit{b}) non-linear transformations of variables of a simple base distribution. Based on the study of the characteristics of these categories, we propose multiple novel methods for each category. For example we proposed RNN based transformations to model non-Markovian dependencies. Further, through a comprehensive study over both real world and synthetic data, we show for that jointly leveraging transformations of variables and autoregressive conditional models, results in a considerable improvement in performance. We illustrate the use of our models in outlier detection and image modeling. Finally we introduce a novel data driven framework for learning a family of distributions.
  • Bayesian Optimisation (BO) refers to a class of methods for global optimisation of a function $f$ which is only accessible via point evaluations. It is typically used in settings where $f$ is expensive to evaluate. A common use case for BO in machine learning is model selection, where it is not possible to analytically model the generalisation performance of a statistical model, and we resort to noisy and expensive training and validation procedures to choose the best model. Conventional BO methods have focused on Euclidean and categorical domains, which, in the context of model selection, only permits tuning scalar hyper-parameters of machine learning algorithms. However, with the surge of interest in deep learning, there is an increasing demand to tune neural network \emph{architectures}. In this work, we develop NASBOT, a Gaussian process based BO framework for neural architecture search. To accomplish this, we develop a distance metric in the space of neural network architectures which can be computed efficiently via an optimal transport program. This distance might be of independent interest to the deep learning community as it may find applications outside of BO. We demonstrate that NASBOT outperforms other alternatives for architecture search in several cross validation based model selection tasks on multi-layer perceptrons and convolutional neural networks.
  • Kernel methods are ubiquitous tools in machine learning. However, there is often little reason for the common practice of selecting a kernel a priori. Even if a universal approximating kernel is selected, the quality of the finite sample estimator may be greatly affected by the choice of kernel. Furthermore, when directly applying kernel methods, one typically needs to compute a $N \times N$ Gram matrix of pairwise kernel evaluations to work with a dataset of $N$ instances. The computation of this Gram matrix precludes the direct application of kernel methods on large datasets, and makes kernel learning especially difficult. In this paper we introduce Bayesian nonparmetric kernel-learning (BaNK), a generic, data-driven framework for scalable learning of kernels. BaNK places a nonparametric prior on the spectral distribution of random frequencies allowing it to both learn kernels and scale to large datasets. We show that this framework can be used for large scale regression and classification tasks. Furthermore, we show that BaNK outperforms several other scalable approaches for kernel learning on a variety of real world datasets.
  • Active Search has become an increasingly useful tool in information retrieval problems where the goal is to discover as many target elements as possible using only limited label queries. With the advent of big data, there is a growing emphasis on the scalability of such techniques to handle very large and very complex datasets. In this paper, we consider the problem of Active Search where we are given a similarity function between data points. We look at an algorithm introduced by Wang et al. [2013] for Active Search over graphs and propose crucial modifications which allow it to scale significantly. Their approach selects points by minimizing an energy function over the graph induced by the similarity function on the data. Our modifications require the similarity function to be a dot-product between feature vectors of data points, equivalent to having a linear kernel for the adjacency matrix. With this, we are able to scale tremendously: for $n$ data points, the original algorithm runs in $O(n^2)$ time per iteration while ours runs in only $O(nr + r^2)$ given $r$-dimensional features. We also describe a simple alternate approach using a weighted-neighbor predictor which also scales well. In our experiments, we show that our method is competitive with existing semi-supervised approaches. We also briefly discuss conditions under which our algorithm performs well.
  • We propose to study equivariance in deep neural networks through parameter symmetries. In particular, given a group $\mathcal{G}$ that acts discretely on the input and output of a standard neural network layer $\phi_{W}: \Re^{M} \to \Re^{N}$, we show that $\phi_{W}$ is equivariant with respect to $\mathcal{G}$-action iff $\mathcal{G}$ explains the symmetries of the network parameters $W$. Inspired by this observation, we then propose two parameter-sharing schemes to induce the desirable symmetry on $W$. Our procedures for tying the parameters achieve $\mathcal{G}$-equivariance and, under some conditions on the action of $\mathcal{G}$, they guarantee sensitivity to all other permutation groups outside $\mathcal{G}$.
  • This paper presents the recurrent estimation of distributions (RED) for modeling real-valued data in a semiparametric fashion. RED models make two novel uses of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) for density estimation of general real-valued data. First, RNNs are used to transform input covariates into a latent space to better capture conditional dependencies in inputs. After, an RNN is used to compute the conditional distributions of the latent covariates. The resulting model is efficient to train, compute, and sample from, whilst producing normalized pdfs. The effectiveness of RED is shown via several real-world data experiments. Our results show that RED models achieve a lower held-out negative log-likelihood than other neural network approaches across multiple dataset sizes and dimensionalities. Further context of the efficacy of RED is provided by considering anomaly detection tasks, where we also observe better performance over alternative models.
  • We design and analyse variations of the classical Thompson sampling (TS) procedure for Bayesian optimisation (BO) in settings where function evaluations are expensive, but can be performed in parallel. Our theoretical analysis shows that a direct application of the sequential Thompson sampling algorithm in either synchronous or asynchronous parallel settings yields a surprisingly powerful result: making $n$ evaluations distributed among $M$ workers is essentially equivalent to performing $n$ evaluations in sequence. Further, by modeling the time taken to complete a function evaluation, we show that, under a time constraint, asynchronously parallel TS achieves asymptotically lower regret than both the synchronous and sequential versions. These results are complemented by an experimental analysis, showing that asynchronous TS outperforms a suite of existing parallel BO algorithms in simulations and in a hyper-parameter tuning application in convolutional neural networks. In addition to these, the proposed procedure is conceptually and computationally much simpler than existing work for parallel BO.
  • Bandit methods for black-box optimisation, such as Bayesian optimisation, are used in a variety of applications including hyper-parameter tuning and experiment design. Recently, \emph{multi-fidelity} methods have garnered considerable attention since function evaluations have become increasingly expensive in such applications. Multi-fidelity methods use cheap approximations to the function of interest to speed up the overall optimisation process. However, most multi-fidelity methods assume only a finite number of approximations. In many practical applications however, a continuous spectrum of approximations might be available. For instance, when tuning an expensive neural network, one might choose to approximate the cross validation performance using less data $N$ and/or few training iterations $T$. Here, the approximations are best viewed as arising out of a continuous two dimensional space $(N,T)$. In this work, we develop a Bayesian optimisation method, BOCA, for this setting. We characterise its theoretical properties and show that it achieves better regret than than strategies which ignore the approximations. BOCA outperforms several other baselines in synthetic and real experiments.
  • Sophisticated gated recurrent neural network architectures like LSTMs and GRUs have been shown to be highly effective in a myriad of applications. We develop an un-gated unit, the statistical recurrent unit (SRU), that is able to learn long term dependencies in data by only keeping moving averages of statistics. The SRU's architecture is simple, un-gated, and contains a comparable number of parameters to LSTMs; yet, SRUs perform favorably to more sophisticated LSTM and GRU alternatives, often outperforming one or both in various tasks. We show the efficacy of SRUs as compared to LSTMs and GRUs in an unbiased manner by optimizing respective architectures' hyperparameters in a Bayesian optimization scheme for both synthetic and real-world tasks.
  • We introduce a simple permutation equivariant layer for deep learning with set structure.This type of layer, obtained by parameter-sharing, has a simple implementation and linear-time complexity in the size of each set. We use deep permutation-invariant networks to perform point-could classification and MNIST-digit summation, where in both cases the output is invariant to permutations of the input. In a semi-supervised setting, where the goal is make predictions for each instance within a set, we demonstrate the usefulness of this type of layer in set-outlier detection as well as semi-supervised learning with clustering side-information.
  • A common problem in disciplines of applied Statistics research such as Astrostatistics is of estimating the posterior distribution of relevant parameters. Typically, the likelihoods for such models are computed via expensive experiments such as cosmological simulations of the universe. An urgent challenge in these research domains is to develop methods that can estimate the posterior with few likelihood evaluations. In this paper, we study active posterior estimation in a Bayesian setting when the likelihood is expensive to evaluate. Existing techniques for posterior estimation are based on generating samples representative of the posterior. Such methods do not consider efficiency in terms of likelihood evaluations. In order to be query efficient we treat posterior estimation in an active regression framework. We propose two myopic query strategies to choose where to evaluate the likelihood and implement them using Gaussian processes. Via experiments on a series of synthetic and real examples we demonstrate that our approach is significantly more query efficient than existing techniques and other heuristics for posterior estimation.
  • Autonomous systems can be used to search for sparse signals in a large space; e.g., aerial robots can be deployed to localize threats, detect gas leaks, or respond to distress calls. Intuitively, search algorithms may increase efficiency by collecting aggregate measurements summarizing large contiguous regions. However, most existing search methods either ignore the possibility of such region observations (e.g., Bayesian optimization and multi-armed bandits) or make strong assumptions about the sensing mechanism that allow each measurement to arbitrarily encode all signals in the entire environment (e.g., compressive sensing). We propose an algorithm that actively collects data to search for sparse signals using only noisy measurements of the average values on rectangular regions (including single points), based on the greedy maximization of information gain. We analyze our algorithm in 1d and show that it requires $\tilde{O}(\frac{n}{\mu^2}+k^2)$ measurements to recover all of $k$ signal locations with small Bayes error, where $\mu$ and $n$ are the signal strength and the size of the search space, respectively. We also show that active designs can be fundamentally more efficient than passive designs with region sensing, contrasting with the results of Arias-Castro, Candes, and Davenport (2013). We demonstrate the empirical performance of our algorithm on a search problem using satellite image data and in high dimensions.
  • Understanding the nature of dark energy, the mysterious force driving the accelerated expansion of the Universe, is a major challenge of modern cosmology. The next generation of cosmological surveys, specifically designed to address this issue, rely on accurate measurements of the apparent shapes of distant galaxies. However, shape measurement methods suffer from various unavoidable biases and therefore will rely on a precise calibration to meet the accuracy requirements of the science analysis. This calibration process remains an open challenge as it requires large sets of high quality galaxy images. To this end, we study the application of deep conditional generative models in generating realistic galaxy images. In particular we consider variations on conditional variational autoencoder and introduce a new adversarial objective for training of conditional generative networks. Our results suggest a reliable alternative to the acquisition of expensive high quality observations for generating the calibration data needed by the next generation of cosmological surveys.
  • We study a variant of the classical stochastic $K$-armed bandit where observing the outcome of each arm is expensive, but cheap approximations to this outcome are available. For example, in online advertising the performance of an ad can be approximated by displaying it for shorter time periods or to narrower audiences. We formalise this task as a multi-fidelity bandit, where, at each time step, the forecaster may choose to play an arm at any one of $M$ fidelities. The highest fidelity (desired outcome) expends cost $\lambda^{(m)}$. The $m^{\text{th}}$ fidelity (an approximation) expends $\lambda^{(m)} < \lambda^{(M)}$ and returns a biased estimate of the highest fidelity. We develop MF-UCB, a novel upper confidence bound procedure for this setting and prove that it naturally adapts to the sequence of available approximations and costs thus attaining better regret than naive strategies which ignore the approximations. For instance, in the above online advertising example, MF-UCB would use the lower fidelities to quickly eliminate suboptimal ads and reserve the larger expensive experiments on a small set of promising candidates. We complement this result with a lower bound and show that MF-UCB is nearly optimal under certain conditions.
  • We propose a Laplace approximation that creates a stochastic unit from any smooth monotonic activation function, using only Gaussian noise. This paper investigates the application of this stochastic approximation in training a family of Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBM) that are closely linked to Bregman divergences. This family, that we call exponential family RBM (Exp-RBM), is a subset of the exponential family Harmoniums that expresses family members through a choice of smooth monotonic non-linearity for each neuron. Using contrastive divergence along with our Gaussian approximation, we show that Exp-RBM can learn useful representations using novel stochastic units.
  • Bayesian Optimisation (BO) is a technique used in optimising a $D$-dimensional function which is typically expensive to evaluate. While there have been many successes for BO in low dimensions, scaling it to high dimensions has been notoriously difficult. Existing literature on the topic are under very restrictive settings. In this paper, we identify two key challenges in this endeavour. We tackle these challenges by assuming an additive structure for the function. This setting is substantially more expressive and contains a richer class of functions than previous work. We prove that, for additive functions the regret has only linear dependence on $D$ even though the function depends on all $D$ dimensions. We also demonstrate several other statistical and computational benefits in our framework. Via synthetic examples, a scientific simulation and a face detection problem we demonstrate that our method outperforms naive BO on additive functions and on several examples where the function is not additive.
  • Total energies of crystal structures can be calculated to high precision using quantum-based density functional theory (DFT) methods, but the calculations can be time consuming and scale badly with system size. Cluster expansions of total energy as a linear superposition of pair, triplet and higher interactions can efficiently approximate the total energies but are best suited to simple lattice structures. To model the total energy of boron carbide, with a complex crystal structure, we explore the utility of machine learning methods ($L_1$-penalized regression, neural network, Gaussian process and support vector regression) that capture certain non-linear effects associated with many-body interactions despite requiring only pair frequencies as input. Our interaction models are combined with Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the thermodynamics of chemical ordering.
  • The use of distributions and high-level features from deep architecture has become commonplace in modern computer vision. Both of these methodologies have separately achieved a great deal of success in many computer vision tasks. However, there has been little work attempting to leverage the power of these to methodologies jointly. To this end, this paper presents the Deep Mean Maps (DMMs) framework, a novel family of methods to non-parametrically represent distributions of features in convolutional neural network models. DMMs are able to both classify images using the distribution of top-level features, and to tune the top-level features for performing this task. We show how to implement DMMs using a special mean map layer composed of typical CNN operations, making both forward and backward propagation simple. We illustrate the efficacy of DMMs at analyzing distributional patterns in image data in a synthetic data experiment. We also show that we extending existing deep architectures with DMMs improves the performance of existing CNNs on several challenging real-world datasets.
  • Many interesting machine learning problems are best posed by considering instances that are distributions, or sample sets drawn from distributions. Previous work devoted to machine learning tasks with distributional inputs has done so through pairwise kernel evaluations between pdfs (or sample sets). While such an approach is fine for smaller datasets, the computation of an $N \times N$ Gram matrix is prohibitive in large datasets. Recent scalable estimators that work over pdfs have done so only with kernels that use Euclidean metrics, like the $L_2$ distance. However, there are a myriad of other useful metrics available, such as total variation, Hellinger distance, and the Jensen-Shannon divergence. This work develops the first random features for pdfs whose dot product approximates kernels using these non-Euclidean metrics, allowing estimators using such kernels to scale to large datasets by working in a primal space, without computing large Gram matrices. We provide an analysis of the approximation error in using our proposed random features and show empirically the quality of our approximation both in estimating a Gram matrix and in solving learning tasks in real-world and synthetic data.
  • Kernel methods give powerful, flexible, and theoretically grounded approaches to solving many problems in machine learning. The standard approach, however, requires pairwise evaluations of a kernel function, which can lead to scalability issues for very large datasets. Rahimi and Recht (2007) suggested a popular approach to handling this problem, known as random Fourier features. The quality of this approximation, however, is not well understood. We improve the uniform error bound of that paper, as well as giving novel understandings of the embedding's variance, approximation error, and use in some machine learning methods. We also point out that surprisingly, of the two main variants of those features, the more widely used is strictly higher-variance for the Gaussian kernel and has worse bounds.
  • We present a modern machine learning approach for cluster dynamical mass measurements that is a factor of two improvement over using a conventional scaling relation. Different methods are tested against a mock cluster catalog constructed using halos with mass >= 10^14 Msolar/h from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL halo catalog. In the conventional method, we use a standard M(sigma_v) power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass, M, from line-of-sight (LOS) galaxy velocity dispersion, sigma_v. The resulting fractional mass error distribution is broad, with width=0.87 (68% scatter), and has extended high-error tails. The standard scaling relation can be simply enhanced by including higher-order moments of the LOS velocity distribution. Applying the kurtosis as a correction term to log(sigma_v) reduces the width of the error distribution to 0.74 (16% improvement). Machine learning can be used to take full advantage of all the information in the velocity distribution. We employ the Support Distribution Machines (SDMs) algorithm that learns from distributions of data to predict single values. SDMs trained and tested on the distribution of LOS velocities yield width=0.46 (47% improvement). Furthermore, the problematic tails of the mass error distribution are effectively eliminated. Decreasing cluster mass errors will improve measurements of the growth of structure and lead to tighter constraints on cosmological parameters.
  • We analyze the problem of regression when both input covariates and output responses are functions from a nonparametric function class. Function to function regression (FFR) covers a large range of interesting applications including time-series prediction problems, and also more general tasks like studying a mapping between two separate types of distributions. However, previous nonparametric estimators for FFR type problems scale badly computationally with the number of input/output pairs in a data-set. Given the complexity of a mapping between general functions it may be necessary to consider large data-sets in order to achieve a low estimation risk. To address this issue, we develop a novel scalable nonparametric estimator, the Triple-Basis Estimator (3BE), which is capable of operating over datasets with many instances. To the best of our knowledge, the 3BE is the first nonparametric FFR estimator that can scale to massive datasets. We analyze the 3BE's risk and derive an upperbound rate. Furthermore, we show an improvement of several orders of magnitude in terms of prediction speed and a reduction in error over previous estimators in various real-world data-sets.
  • We consider the problem of inferring constraints on a high-dimensional parameter space with a computationally expensive likelihood function. We propose a machine learning algorithm that maps out the Frequentist confidence limit on parameter space by intelligently targeting likelihood evaluations so as to quickly and accurately characterize the likelihood surface in both low- and high-likelihood regions. We compare our algorithm to Bayesian credible limits derived by the well-tested Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm using both multi-modal toy likelihood functions and the 7-year WMAP cosmic microwave background likelihood function. We find that our algorithm correctly identifies the location, general size, and general shape of high-likelihood regions in parameter space while being more robust against multi-modality than MCMC.