• We present a sample of accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in dwarf galaxies at $z<1$. We identify dwarf galaxies in the NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey with stellar masses $M_{\star}<3\times 10^{9} M_{\odot}$ that have spectroscopic redshifts from the DEEP2 survey and lie within the region covered by deep (flux limit of $\sim 5\times 10^{-17} - 6\times 10^{-16} \rm{erg \ cm}^{-2} \ \rm{s}^{-1}$) archival Chandra X-ray data. From our sample of $605$ dwarf galaxies, $10$ exhibit X-ray emission consistent with that arising from AGN activity. If black hole mass scales roughly with stellar mass, then we expect that these AGN are powered by SMBHs with masses of $\sim 10^5-10^6 \ M_{\odot}$ and typical Eddington ratios $\sim 5\%$. Furthermore, we find an AGN fraction consistent with extrapolations of other searches of $\sim 0.6-3\%$ for $10^9 \ M_{\odot} \leq M_{\star} \leq 3\times 10^{9} \ M_{\odot}$ and $0.1<z<0.6$. Our AGN fraction is in good agreement with a semi-analytic model, suggesting that as we search larger volumes we may use comparisons between observed AGN fractions and models to understand seeding mechanisms in the early universe.
  • We present optical long-slit spectroscopy and far-ultraviolet to near-infrared spectral energy distribution fitting of two diffuse dwarf galaxies, LSBG-285 and LSBG-750, which were recently discovered by the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP). We measure redshifts using H$\alpha$ line emission, and find that these galaxies are at comoving distances of ${\approx}25$ and ${\approx}41$ Mpc, respectively, after correcting for the local velocity field. They have effective radii of $r_\mathrm{eff}=1.2$ and 1.8 kpc and stellar masses of $M_\star\approx2$-$3\times10^{7}~M_\odot$. There are no massive galaxies ($M_\star>10^{10} M_\odot$) within a comoving separation of at least 1.5 Mpc from LSBG-285 and 2 Mpc from LSBG-750. These sources are similar in size and surface brightness to ultra-diffuse galaxies, except they are isolated, star-forming objects that were optically selected in an environmentally blind survey. Both galaxies likely have low stellar metallicities $[Z_\star/Z_\odot] < -1.0$ and are consistent with the stellar mass-metallicity relation for dwarf galaxies. We set an upper limit on LSBG-750's rotational velocity of ${\sim}50$ km s$^{-1}$, which is comparable to dwarf galaxies of similar stellar mass with estimated halo masses $<10^{11}~M_\odot$. We find tentative evidence that the gas-phase metallicities in both of these diffuse systems are high for their stellar mass, though a statistically complete, optically-selected galaxy sample at very low surface brightness will be necessary to place these results into context with the higher-surface-brightness galaxy population.
  • We present a catalog of extended low-surface-brightness galaxies (LSBGs) identified in the Wide layer of the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP). Using the first ${\sim}$200 deg$^2$ of the survey, we have uncovered 781 LSBGs, spanning red ($g-i\geq0.64$) and blue ($g-i<0.64$) colors and a wide range of morphologies. Since we focus on extended galaxies ($r_\mathrm{eff}=2.5$-$14^{\prime\prime}$), our sample is likely dominated by low-redshift objects. We define LSBGs to have mean surface brightnesses $\bar{\mu}_\mathrm{eff}(g)>24.3$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$, which allows nucleated galaxies into our sample. As a result, the central surface brightness distribution spans a wide range of $\mu_0(g)=18$-$27.4$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$, with 50% and 95% of galaxies fainter than 24.3 and 22 mag arcsec$^{-2}$, respectively. Furthermore, the surface brightness distribution is a strong function of color, with the red distribution being much broader and generally fainter than that of the blue LSBGs, and this trend shows a clear correlation with galaxy morphology. Red LSBGs typically have smooth light profiles that are well-characterized by single-component S\'{e}rsic functions. In contrast, blue LSBGs tend to have irregular morphologies and show evidence for ongoing star formation. We crossmatch our sample with existing optical, HI, and ultraviolet catalogs to gain insight into the physical nature of the LSBGs. We find that our sample is diverse, ranging from dwarf spheroidals and ultra-diffuse galaxies in nearby groups to gas-rich irregulars to giant LSB spirals, demonstrating the potential of the HSC-SSP to provide a truly unprecedented view of the LSBG population.
  • The process by which massive galaxies transition from blue, star-forming disks into red, quiescent galaxies remains one of the most poorly-understood aspects of galaxy evolution. In this investigation, we attempt to gain a better understanding of how star formation is quenched by focusing on a massive post-starburst galaxy at z = 0.747. The target has a high stellar mass and a molecular gas fraction of ~30% -- unusually high for its low star formation rate. We look for indicators of star formation suppression mechanisms in the stellar kinematics and age distribution of the galaxy obtained from spatially resolved Gemini Integral-Field spectra and in the gas kinematics obtained from ALMA. We find evidence of significant rotation in the stars, but we do not detect a stellar age gradient within 5 kpc. The molecular gas is aligned with the stellar component, and we see no evidence of strong gas outflows. Our target may represent the product of a merger-induced starburst or of morphological quenching; however, our results are not completely consistent with any of the prominent quenching models.
  • Narrow-line regions excited by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are important for studying AGN photoionization and feedback. Their strong [O III] lines can be detected with broadband images, allowing morphological studies of these systems with large-area imaging surveys. We develop a new technique to reconstruct the [O III] images using the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Survey aided with spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The technique involves a careful subtraction of the galactic continuum to isolate emission from the [O III]$\lambda$5007 and [O III]$\lambda$4959 lines. Compared to traditional targeted observations, this technique is more efficient at covering larger samples with less dedicated observational resources. We apply this technique to an SDSS spectroscopically selected sample of 300 obscured AGN at redshifts 0.1 - 0.7, uncovering extended emission-line region candidates with sizes up to tens of kpc. With the largest sample of uniformly derived narrow-line region sizes, we revisit the narrow-line region size-luminosity relation. The area and radii of the [O III] emission-line regions are strongly correlated with the AGN luminosity inferred from the mid-infrared (15 $\mu$m rest-frame) with a power-law slope of $0.62^{+0.05}_{-0.06} \pm 0.10$ (statistical and systemic errors), consistent with previous spectroscopic findings. We discuss the implications for the physics of AGN emission-line region and future applications of this technique, which should be useful for current and next-generation imaging surveys to study AGN photoionization and feedback with large statistical samples.
  • Most active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are radio-quiet, and the origin of their radio emission is not well-understood. One hypothesis is that this radio emission is a by-product of quasar-driven winds. In this paper, we present the radio properties of 108 extremely red quasars (ERQs) at $z=2-4$. ERQs are among the most luminous quasars ($L_{bol} \sim 10^{47-48}$ erg/s) in the Universe, with signatures of extreme ($\gg 1000$ km/s) outflows in their [OIII]$\lambda$5007 \AA\ emission, making them the best subjects to seek the connection between radio and outflow activity. All ERQs but one are unresolved in the radio on $\sim 10$ kpc scales, and the median radio luminosity of ERQs is $\nu L_\nu [{\rm 6\,GHz}] = 10^{41.0}$ erg/s, in the radio-quiet regime, but one to two orders of magnitude higher than that of other quasar samples. The radio spectra are steep, with a mean spectral index $\langle \alpha \rangle = -1.0$. In addition, ERQs neatly follow the extrapolation of the low-redshift correlation between radio luminosity and the velocity dispersion of [OIII]-emitting ionized gas. Uncollimated winds, with a power of one per cent of the bolometric luminosity, can account for all these observations. Such winds would interact with and shock the gas around the quasar and in the host galaxy, resulting in acceleration of relativistic particles and the consequent synchrotron emission observed in the radio. Our observations support the picture in which ERQs are signposts of extremely powerful episodes of quasar feedback, and quasar-driven winds as a contributor of the radio emission in the intermediate regime of radio luminosity $\nu L_\nu = 10^{39}-10^{42}$ erg/s.
  • We present our ALMA Cycle 4 measurements of the [CII] emission line and the underlying far-infrared (FIR) continuum emission from four optically low-luminosity ($M_{\rm 1450} > -25$) quasars at $z \gtrsim 6$ discovered by the Subaru Hyper Suprime Cam (HSC) survey. The [CII] line and FIR continuum luminosities lie in the ranges $L_{\rm [CII]} = (3.8-10.2) \times 10^8~L_\odot$ and $L_{\rm FIR} = (1.2-2.0) \times 10^{11}~L_\odot$, which are at least one order of magnitude smaller than those of optically-luminous quasars at $z \gtrsim 6$. We estimate the star formation rates (SFR) of our targets as $\simeq 23-40~M_\odot ~{\rm yr}^{-1}$. Their line and continuum-emitting regions are marginally resolved, and found to be comparable in size to those of optically luminous quasars, indicating that their SFR or likely gas mass surface densities (key controlling parameter of mass accretion) are accordingly different. The $L_{\rm [CII]}/L_{\rm FIR}$ ratios of the hosts, $\simeq (2.2-8.7) \times 10^{-3}$, are fully consistent with local star-forming galaxies. Using the [CII] dynamics, we derived their dynamical masses within a radius of 1.5-2.5 kpc as $\simeq (1.4-8.2) \times 10^{10}~M_\odot$. By interpreting these masses as stellar ones, we suggest that these faint quasar hosts are on or even below the star-forming main sequence at $z \sim 6$, i.e., they appear to be transforming into quiescent galaxies. This is in contrast to the optically luminous quasars at those redshifts, which show starburst-like properties. Finally, we find that the ratios of black hole mass to host galaxy dynamical mass of the most of low-luminosity quasars including the HSC ones are consistent with the local value. The mass ratios of the HSC quasars can be reproduced by a semi-analytical model that assumes merger-induced black hole-host galaxy evolution.
  • We present near-infrared observations of 35 of the most massive early-type galaxies in the local universe. The observations were made using the infrared channel of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 in the F110W (1.1 $\mu$m) filter. We measured surface brightness profiles and elliptical isophotal fit parameters from the nuclear regions out to a radius of ~10 kpc in most cases. We find that 37% (13) of the galaxies in our sample have isophotal position angle rotations greater than 20 degrees over the radial range imaged by WFC3/IR, which is often due to the presence of neighbors or multiple nuclei. Most galaxies in our sample are significantly rounder near the center than in the outer regions. This sample contains six fast rotators and 28 slow rotators. We find that all fast rotators are either disky or show no measurable deviation from purely elliptical isophotes. Among slow rotators, significantly disky and boxy galaxies occur with nearly equal frequency. The galaxies in our sample often exhibit changing isophotal shapes, sometimes showing both significantly disky and boxy isophotes at different radii. The fact that parameters vary widely between galaxies and within individual galaxies is evidence that these massive galaxies have complicated formation histories, and some of them have experienced recent mergers and have not fully relaxed. These data demonstrate the value of high spatial resolution IR imaging of galaxies and provide measurements necessary for determining stellar masses, dynamics, and black hole masses in high mass galaxies.
  • Quasars may have played a key role in limiting the stellar mass of massive galaxies. Identifying those quasars in the process of removing star formation fuel from their hosts is an exciting ongoing challenge in extragalactic astronomy. In this paper we present X-ray observations of eleven extremely red quasars (ERQs) with $L_{\rm bol}\sim 10^{47}$ erg s$^{-1}$ at $z=1.5-3.2$ with evidence for high-velocity ($v > 1000$ km s$^{-1}$) [OIII]$\lambda$5007\AA\ outflows. X-rays allow us to directly probe circumnuclear obscuration and to measure the instantaneous accretion luminosity. We detect ten out of eleven extremely red quasars available in targeted and archival data. Using a combination of X-ray spectral fitting and hardness ratios, we find that all of the ERQs show signs of absorption in the X-rays with inferred column densities of $N_{\rm H}\approx 10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, including four Compton-thick candidates ($N_{\rm H} > 10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$). We stack the X-ray emission of the seven weakly detected sources, measuring an average column density of $N_{\rm H}\sim 8\times 10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$. The absorption-corrected (intrinsic) $2-10$ keV X-ray luminosity of the stack is $2.7\times 10^{45}$ erg s$^{-1}$, consistent with X-ray luminosities of type 1 quasars of the same infrared luminosity. Thus, we find that ERQs are a highly obscured, borderline Compton-thick population, and based on optical and infrared data we suggest that these objects are partially hidden by their own equatorial outflows. However, unlike some quasars with known outflows, ERQs do not appear to be intrinsically underluminous in X-rays for their bolometric luminosity. Our observations indicate that low X-rays are not necessary to enable some types of radiatively driven winds.
  • We use spatially resolved two-dimensional stellar velocity maps over a $107''\times 107''$ field of view to investigate the kinematic features of 90 early-type galaxies above stellar mass $10^{11.5}M_\odot$ in the MASSIVE survey. We measure the misalignment angle $\Psi$ between the kinematic and photometric axes and identify local features such as velocity twists and kinematically distinct components. We find 46% of the sample to be well aligned ($\Psi < 15^{\circ}$), 33% misaligned, and 21% without detectable rotation (non-rotators). Only 24% of the sample are fast rotators, the majority of which (91%) are aligned, whereas 57% of the slow rotators are misaligned with a nearly flat distribution of $\Psi$ from $15^{\circ}$ to $90^{\circ}$. We find that 11 galaxies have $\Psi \gtrsim 60^{\circ}$ and thus exhibit minor-axis rotation (or "prolate" rotation) in which the rotation is preferentially around the photometric major axis. We find kinematic misalignment to occur more frequently for higher stellar mass, lower galaxy spin, lower ellipticity, or denser galaxy environments. In terms of local kinematic features, 51% of the sample exhibit kinematic twists of larger than $20^{\circ}$, and 2 galaxies have kinematically distinct components. The frequency of misalignment and the broad distribution of $\Psi$ reported here suggest that the most massive early-type galaxies are likely to be at least mildly triaxial, and the formation processes resulting in kinematically misaligned slow rotators such as gas-poor mergers occur frequently in this mass range.
  • Collisions and interactions between gas-rich galaxies are thought to be pivotal stages in their formation and evolution, causing the rapid production of new stars, and possibly serving as a mechanism for fueling supermassive black holes (BH). Harnessing the exquisite spatial resolution (~0.5 arcsec) afforded by the first ~170 deg^2 of the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Survey, we present our new constraints on the importance of galaxy-galaxy major mergers (1:4) in growing BHs throughout the last ~8 Gyrs. Utilizing mid-infrared observations in the WISE All-Sky survey, we robustly select active galactic nuclei (AGN) and mass-matched control galaxy samples, totaling ~140,000 spectroscopically confirmed systems at i<22 mag. We identify galaxy interaction signatures using a novel machine-learning random forest decision tree technique allowing us to select statistically significant samples of major-mergers, minor-mergers/irregular-systems, and non-interacting galaxies. We use these samples to show that galaxies undergoing mergers are a factor ~2-7 more likely to contain luminous obscured AGN than non-interacting galaxies, and this is independent of both stellar mass and redshift to z < 0.9. Furthermore, based on our comparison of AGN fractions in mass-matched samples, we determine that the most luminous AGN population (L_AGN > 10^45 erg/s) systematically reside in merging systems over non-interacting galaxies. Our findings show that galaxy-galaxy interactions do, on average, trigger luminous AGN activity substantially more often than in secularly evolving non-interacting galaxies, and we further suggest that the BH growth rate may be closely tied to the dynamical time of the merger system.
  • We study 379 central and 159 satellite early-type galaxies with two-dimensional kinematics from the integral-field survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) to determine how their angular momentum content depends on stellar and halo mass. Using the Yang et. al. (2007) group catalog, we identify central and satellite galaxies in groups with halo masses in the range 10^12.5 h^-1 M_sun < M_200b < 10^15 h^-1 M_sun. As in previous work, we see a sharp dependence on stellar mass, in the sense that ~ 70% of galaxies with stellar mass M_* > 10^11 h^-2 M_sun tend to have very little rotation, while nearly all galaxies at lower mass show some net rotation. The ~ 30% of high-mass galaxies that have significant rotation do not stand out in other galaxy properties except for a higher incidence of ionized gas emission. Our data are consistent with recent simulation results suggesting that major merging and gas accretion have more impact on the rotational support of lower-mass galaxies. When carefully matching the stellar mass distributions, we find no residual differences in angular momentum content between satellite and central galaxies at the 20\% level. Similarly, at fixed mass, galaxies have consistent rotation properties across a wide range of halo mass. However, we find that errors in classification of centrals and satellites with group finders systematically lowers differences between satellite and central galaxies at a level that is comparable to current measurement uncertainties. To improve constraints, the impact of group finding methods will have to be forward modeled via mock catalogs.
  • In this paper, we investigate 2727 galaxies observed by MaNGA as of June 2016 to develop spatially resolved techniques for identifying signatures of active galactic nuclei (AGN). We identify 303 AGN candidates. The additional spatial dimension imposes challenges in identifying AGN due to contamination from diffuse ionized gas, extra-planar gas and photoionization by hot stars. We show that the combination of spatially-resolved line diagnostic diagrams and additional cuts on H$\alpha$ surface brighness and H$\alpha$ equivalent width can distinguish between AGN-like signatures and high-metallicity galaxies with LINER-like spectra. Low mass galaxies with high specific star formation rates are particularly difficult to diagnose and routinely show diagnostic line ratios outside of the standard star-formation locus. We develop a new diagnostic -- the distance from the standard diagnostic line in the line-ratios space -- to evaluate the significance of the deviation from the star-formation locus. We find 173 galaxies that would not have been selected as AGN candidates based on single-fibre spectral measurements but exhibit photoionization signatures suggestive of AGN activity in the MaNGA resolved observations, underscoring the power of large integral field unit (IFU) surveys. A complete census of these new AGN candidates is necessary to understand their nature and probe the complex co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their hosts.
  • We present the discovery of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) that is turning off and then on again in the z=0.06 galaxy SDSS J1354+1327. This episodic nuclear activity is the result of discrete accretion events, which could have been triggered by a past interaction with the companion galaxy that is currently located 12.5 kpc away. We originally targeted SDSS J1354+1327 because its Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum has narrow AGN emission lines that exhibit a velocity offset of 69 km s$^{-1}$ relative to systemic. To determine the nature of the galaxy and its velocity-offset emission lines, we observed SDSS J1354+1327 with Chandra/ACIS, Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3, Apache Point Observatory optical longslit spectroscopy, and Keck/OSIRIS integral-field spectroscopy. We find a ~10 kpc cone of photoionized gas south of the galaxy center and a ~1 kpc semi-spherical front of shocked gas, which is responsible for the velocity offset in the emission lines, north of the galaxy center. We interpret these two outflows as the result of two separate AGN accretion events; the first AGN outburst created the southern outflow, and then $<10^5$ yrs later the second AGN outburst launched the northern shock front. SDSS J1354+1327 is the galaxy with the strongest evidence for an AGN that has turned off and then on again, and it fits into the broader context of AGN flickering that includes observations of AGN light echoes.
  • While 2% of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) exhibit narrow emission lines with line-of-sight velocities that are significantly offset from the velocity of the host galaxy's stars, the nature of these velocity offsets is unknown. We investigate this question with Chandra/ACIS and Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 observations of seven velocity-offset AGNs at z<0.12, and all seven galaxies have a central AGN but a peak in emission that is spatially offset by < kpc from the host galaxy's stellar centroid. These spatial offsets are responsible for the observed velocity offsets and are due to shocks, either from AGN outflows (in four galaxies) or gas inflowing along a bar (in three galaxies). We compare our results to a velocity-offset AGN whose velocity offset originates from a spatially offset AGN in a galaxy merger. The optical line flux ratios of the offset AGN are consistent with pure photoionization, while the optical line flux ratios of our sample are consistent with contributions from photoionization and shocks. We conclude that these optical line flux ratios could be efficient for separating velocity-offset AGNs into subgroups of offset AGNs -- which are important for studies of AGN fueling in galaxy mergers -- and central AGNs with shocks -- where the outflows are biased towards the most energetic outflows that are the strongest drivers of feedback.
  • RGG 118 (SDSS 1523+1145) is a nearby ($z=0.0243$), dwarf disk galaxy ($M_{\ast}\approx2\times10^{9} M_{\odot}$) found to host an active $\sim50,000$ solar mass black hole at its core (Baldassare et al. 2015). RGG 118 is one of a growing collective sample of dwarf galaxies known to contain active galactic nuclei -- a group which, until recently, contained only a handful of objects. Here, we report on new \textit{Hubble Space Telescope} Wide Field Camera 3 UVIS and IR imaging of RGG 118, with the main goal of analyzing its structure. Using 2-D parametric modeling, we find that the morphology of RGG 118 is best described by an outer spiral disk, inner component consistent with a pseudobulge, and central PSF. The luminosity of the PSF is consistent with the central point source being dominated by the AGN. We measure the luminosity and mass of the "pseudobulge" and confirm that the central black hole in RGG 118 is under-massive with respect to the $M_{BH}-M_{\rm bulge}$ and $M_{BH}-L_{\rm bulge}$ relations. This result is consistent with a picture in which black holes in disk-dominated galaxies grow primarily through secular processes.
  • We present observed mid-infrared and optical colors and composite spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of type 1 (broad-line) and 2 (narrow-line) quasars selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. A significant fraction of powerful quasars are obscured by dust, and are difficult to detect in optical photometric or spectroscopic surveys. However these may be more easily identified on the basis of mid-infrared (MIR) colors and SEDs. Using samples of SDSS type 1 type 2 matched in redshift and [OIII] luminosity, we produce composite rest-frame 0.2-15 micron SEDs based on SDSS, UKIDSS, and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometry and perform model fits using simple galaxy and quasar SED templates. The SEDs of type 1 and 2 quasars are remarkably similar, with the differences explained primarily by the extinction of the quasar component in the type 2 systems. For both types of quasar, the flux of the AGN relative to the host galaxy increases with AGN luminosity (L_[OIII]) and redder observed MIR color, but we find only weak dependencies of the composite SEDs on mechanical jet power as determined through radio luminosity. We conclude that luminous quasars can be effectively selected using simple MIR color criteria similar to those identified previously (W1-W2 > 0.7 [Vega]), although these criteria miss many heavily obscured objects. Obscured quasars can be further identified based on optical-IR colors (for example, (u-W3 [AB]) > 1.4(W1-W2 [Vega])+3.2). These results illustrate the power of large statistical studies of obscured quasars selected on the basis of mid-IR and optical photometry.
  • Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the 10 million to 10 billion $M_\odot$ range form in galaxy mergers, and live in galactic nuclei with large and poorly constrained concentrations of gas and stars. There are currently no observations of merging SMBHBs--- it is in fact possible that they stall at their final parsec of separation and never merge. While LIGO has detected high frequency GWs, SMBHBs emit GWs in the nanohertz to millihertz band. This is inaccessible to ground-based interferometers, but possible with Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs). Using data from local galaxies in the 2 Micron All-Sky Survey, together with galaxy merger rates from Illustris, we find that there are on average $91\pm7$ sources emitting GWs in the PTA band, and $7\pm2$ binaries which will never merge. Local unresolved SMBHBs can contribute to GW background anisotropy at a level of $\sim20\%$, and if the GW background can be successfully isolated, GWs from at least one local SMBHB can be detected in 10 years.
  • The physical mechanisms that quench star formation, turning blue star-forming galaxies into red quiescent galaxies, remain unclear. In this Letter, we investigate the role of gas supply in suppressing star formation by studying the molecular gas content of post-starburst galaxies. Leveraging the wide area of the SDSS, we identify a sample of massive intermediate-redshift galaxies that have just ended their primary epoch of star formation. We present ALMA CO(2-1) observations of two of these post-starburst galaxies at z~0.7 with M* ~ 2x10^11 Msun. Their molecular gas reservoirs of (6.4 +/- 0.8) x 10^9 Msun and (34.0 +/- 1.6) x 10^9 Msun are an order of magnitude larger than comparable-mass galaxies in the local universe. Our observations suggest that quenching does not require the total removal or depletion of molecular gas, as many quenching models suggest. However, further observations are required both to determine if these apparently quiescent objects host highly obscured star formation and to investigate the intrinsic variation in the molecular gas properties of post-starburst galaxies.
  • We measure the radial profiles of the stellar velocity dispersions, $\sigma(R)$, for 85 early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the MASSIVE survey, a volume-limited integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) galaxy survey targeting all northern-sky ETGs with absolute $K$-band magnitude $M_K < -25.3$ mag, or stellar mass $M_* > 4 \times 10^{11} M_\odot$, within 108 Mpc. Our wide-field 107" $\times$ 107" IFS data cover radii as large as 40 kpc, for which we quantify separately the inner ($<5$ kpc) and outer logarithmic slopes $\gamma_{\rm inner}$ and $\gamma_{\rm outer}$ of $\sigma(R)$. While $\gamma_{\rm inner}$ is mostly negative, of the 61 galaxies with sufficient radial coverage to determine $\gamma_{\rm outer}$ we find 33% to have rising outer dispersion profiles ($\gamma_{\rm outer} > 0.03$), 13% to be flat ($-0.03 < \gamma_{\rm outer} < 0.03$), and 54% to be falling. The fraction of galaxies with rising outer profiles increases with $M_*$ and in denser galaxy environment, with the 11 most massive galaxies in our sample all having flat or rising dispersion profiles. The strongest environmental correlation is with halo mass, but weaker correlations with large-scale density and local density also exist. The average $\gamma_{\rm outer}$ is similar for brightest group galaxies, satellites, and isolated galaxies in our sample. We find a clear positive correlation between the gradients of the outer dispersion profile and the gradients of the velocity kurtosis $h_4$. Altogether, our kinematic results suggest that the increasing fraction of rising dispersion profiles in the most massive ETGs are caused (at least in part) by variations in the total mass profiles rather than in the velocity anisotropy alone.
  • We analyse the environmental properties of 370 local early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the MASSIVE and ATLAS3D surveys, two complementary volume-limited integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) galaxy surveys spanning absolute $K$-band magnitude $-21.5 > M_K > -26.6$, or stellar mass $8 \times 10^{9} < M_* < 2 \times 10^{12} M_\odot$. We find these galaxies to reside in a diverse range of environments measured by four methods: group membership (whether a galaxy is a brightest group/cluster galaxy, satellite, or isolated), halo mass, large-scale mass density (measured over a few Mpc), and local mass density (measured within the $N$th neighbour). The spatially resolved IFS stellar kinematics provide robust measurements of the spin parameter $\lambda_e$ and enable us to examine the relationship among $\lambda_e$, $M_*$, and galaxy environment. We find a strong correlation between $\lambda_e$ and $M_*$, where the average $\lambda_e$ decreases from $\sim 0.4$ to below 0.1 with increasing mass, and the fraction of slow rotators $f_{\rm slow}$ increases from $\sim 10$% to 90%. We show for the first time that at fixed $M_*$, there are almost no trends between galaxy spin and environment; the apparent kinematic morphology-density relation for ETGs is therefore primarily driven by $M_*$ and is accounted for by the joint correlations between $M_*$ and spin, and between $M_*$ and environment. A possible exception is that the increased $f_{\rm slow}$ at high local density is slightly more than expected based only on these joint correlations. Our results suggest that the physical processes responsible for building up the present-day stellar masses of massive galaxies are also very efficient at reducing their spin, in any environment.
  • Using HST, we identify circumnuclear ($100$-$500$ pc scale) structures in nine new H$_2$O megamaser host galaxies to understand the flow of matter from kpc-scale galactic structures down to the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at galactic centers. We double the sample analyzed in a similar way by Greene et al. (2013) and consider the properties of the combined sample of 18 sources. We find that disk-like structure is virtually ubiquitous when we can resolve $<200$ pc scales, in support of the notion that non-axisymmetries on these scales are a necessary condition for SMBH fueling. We perform an analysis of the orientation of our identified nuclear regions and compare it with the orientation of megamaser disks and the kpc-scale disks of the hosts. We find marginal evidence that the disk-like nuclear structures show increasing misalignment from the kpc-scale host galaxy disk as the scale of the structure decreases. In turn, we find that the orientation of both the $\sim100$ pc scale nuclear structures and their host galaxy large-scale disks is consistent with random with respect to the orientation of their respective megamaser disks.
  • Galaxy-scale bars are expected to provide an effective means for driving material towards the central region in spiral galaxies, and possibly feeding supermassive black holes (BHs). Here we present a statistically-complete study of the effect of bars on average BH accretion. From a well-selected sample of 50,794 spiral galaxies (with M* ~ 0.2-30 x 10^10 Msun) extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Galaxy Zoo 2 project, we separate those sources considered to contain galaxy-scale bars from those that do not. Using archival data taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we identify X-ray luminous (L_X >~ 10^41 erg/s) active galactic nuclei (AGN) and perform an X-ray stacking analysis on the remaining X-ray undetected sources. Through X-ray stacking, we derive a time-averaged look at accretion for galaxies at fixed stellar mass and star formation rate, finding that the average nuclear accretion rates of galaxies with bar structures are fully consistent with those lacking bars (Mdot_acc ~ 3 x 10^-5 Msun/yr). Hence, we robustly conclude that large-scale bars have little or no effect on the average growth of BHs in nearby (z < 0.15) galaxies over gigayear timescales.
  • We report the discovery of a diffuse stellar cloud with an angular extent $\gtrsim30^{\prime\prime}$, which we term "Sumo Puff", in data from the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP). While we do not have a redshift for this object, it is in close angular proximity to a post-merger galaxy at redshift $z=0.0431$ and is projected within a few virial radii (assuming similar redshifts) of two other ${\sim}L_\star$ galaxies, which we use to bracket a potential redshift range of $0.0055 < z < 0.0431$. The object's light distribution is flat, as characterized by a low Sersic index ($n\sim0.3$). It has a low central $g$-band surface brightness of ${\sim}26.4$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$, large effective radius of ${\sim}13^{\prime\prime}$ (${\sim}11$ kpc at $z=0.0431$ and ${\sim}1.5$ kpc at $z=0.0055$), and an elongated morphology ($b/a\sim0.4$). Its red color ($g-i\sim1$) is consistent with a passively evolving stellar population and similar to the nearby post-merger galaxy, and we may see tidal material connecting Sumo Puff with this galaxy. We offer two possible interpretations for the nature of this object: (1) it is an extreme, galaxy-size tidal feature associated with a recent merger event, or (2) it is a foreground dwarf galaxy with properties consistent with a quenched, disturbed ultra-diffuse galaxy. We present a qualitative comparison with simulations that demonstrates the feasibility of forming a structure similar to this object in a merger event. Follow-up spectroscopy and/or deeper imaging to confirm the presence of the bridge of tidal material will be necessary to reveal the true nature of this object.
  • Galaxy mergers are likely to play a role in triggering active galactic nuclei (AGN), but the conditions under which this process occurs are poorly understood. In Paper I, we constructed a sample of spatially offset X-ray AGN that represent galaxy mergers hosting a single AGN. In this paper, we use our offset AGN sample to constrain the parameters that affect AGN observability in galaxy mergers. We also construct dual AGN samples with similar selection properties for comparison. We find that the offset AGN fraction shows no evidence for a dependence on AGN luminosity, while the dual AGN fractions show stronger evidence for a positive dependence, suggesting that the merger events forming dual AGN are more efficient at instigating accretion onto supermassive black holes than those forming offset AGN. We also find that the offset and dual AGN fractions both have a negative dependence on nuclear separation and are similar in value at small physical scales. This dependence may become stronger when restricted to high AGN luminosities, though a larger sample is needed for confirmation. These results indicate that the probability of AGN triggering increases at later merger stages. This study is the first to systematically probe down to nuclear separations of <1 kpc (~0.8 kpc) and is consistent with predictions from simulations that AGN observability peaks in this regime. We also find that the offset AGN are not preferentially obscured compared to the parent AGN sample, suggesting that our selection may be targeting galaxy mergers with relatively dust-free nuclear regions.