• We investigate the magnetic field in an intermediate-velocity filament for which the H$\alpha$ intensity in the WHAM survey correlates with excess Faraday rotation of extragalactic radio sources over the length of the filament from b ~ 20 degr. to b ~ 55 degr. The density-weighted mean magnetic field is 2.8 +/- 0.8 microgauss, derived from rotation measures and an empirical relation between H-alpha emission measure and dispersion measure from Berkhuijsen et al. (2006). In view of the uncertainties in the derived magnetic field strength, we propose an alternative use of the available data, rotation measure and emission measure, to derive a lower limit to the Alfven speed, weighted by electron density n_e^1.5. We find lower limits to the Alfven speed that are comparable to, or larger than the sound speed in a 10^4 K plasma, and conclude that the magnetic field is dynamically important. We discuss the role of intermediate-velocity gas as a locus of Faraday rotation in the interstellar medium, and propose this lower limit to the Alfven speed may also be applicable to Faraday rotation by galaxy clusters.
  • We have mapped cold atomic gas in 21cm line HI self-absorption (HISA) at arcminute resolution over more than 90% of the Milky Way's disk. To probe the formation of H2 clouds, we have compared our HISA distribution with CO J=1-0 line emission. Few HISA features in the outer Galaxy have CO at the same position and velocity, while most inner-Galaxy HISA has overlapping CO. But many apparent inner-Galaxy HISA-CO associations can be explained as chance superpositions, so most inner-Galaxy HISA may also be CO-free. Since standard equilibrium cloud models cannot explain the very cold HI in many HISA features without molecules being present, these clouds may instead have significant CO-dark H2.
  • (abridged) Observations of Faraday rotation for extragalactic sources probe magnetic fields both inside and outside the Milky Way. Building on our earlier estimate of the Galactic contribution, we set out to estimate the extragalactic contributions. We discuss the problems involved; in particular, we point out that taking the difference between the observed values and the Galactic foreground reconstruction is not a good estimate for the extragalactic contributions. We point out a degeneracy between the contributions to the observed values due to extragalactic magnetic fields and observational noise and comment on the dangers of over-interpreting an estimate without taking into account its uncertainty information. To overcome these difficulties, we develop an extended reconstruction algorithm based on the assumption that the observational uncertainties are accurately described for a subset of the data, which can overcome the degeneracy with the extragalactic contributions. We present a probabilistic derivation of the algorithm and demonstrate its performance using a simulation, yielding a high quality reconstruction of the Galactic Faraday rotation foreground, a precise estimate of the typical extragalactic contribution, and a well-defined probabilistic description of the extragalactic contribution for each data point. We then apply this reconstruction technique to a catalog of Faraday rotation observations. We vary our assumptions about the data, showing that the dispersion of extragalactic contributions to observed Faraday depths is most likely lower than 7 rad/m^2, in agreement with earlier results, and that the extragalactic contribution to an individual data point is poorly constrained by the data in most cases.
  • We use previously published high-resolution synchrotron polarization data to perform an angular dispersion analysis with the aim of charactering magnetized turbulence in M51. We first analyze three distinct regions (the center of the galaxy, and the northwest and southwest spiral arms) and can clearly discern the turbulent correlation length scale from the width of the magnetized turbulent correlation function for two regions and detect the imprint of anisotropy in the turbulence for all three. Furthermore, analyzing the galaxy as a whole allows us to determine a two-dimensional Gaussian model for the magnetized turbulence in M51. We measure the turbulent correlation scales parallel and perpendicular to the local mean magnetic field to be, respectively, delta_{para} = 98 +/- 5 pc and delta_{perp} = 54 +/- 3 pc, while the turbulent to ordered magnetic field strength ratio is found to be Bt/B0 = 1.01 +/- 0.04. These results are consistent with those of Fletcher et al. (2011), who performed a Faraday rotation dispersion analysis of the same data, and our detection of anisotropy is consistent with current magnetized turbulence theories.
  • GALFACTS is a large-area spectro-polarimetric survey on the Arecibo Radio telescope. It uses the seven-beam focal plane feed array receiver system (ALFA) to carry out an imaging survey project of the 12,700 square degrees of sky visible from Arecibo at 1.4 GHz with 8192 spectral channels over a bandwidth of 300 MHz sampled at 1 millisecond. The aggregate data rate is 875 MB/s. GALFACTS observations will create full-Stokes image cubes at an angular resolution of 3.5' with a band-averaged sensitivity of 90 $\mu$Jy, allowing sensitive imaging of polarized radiation and Faraday Rotation Measure from both diffuse emission and extragalactic sources. GALFACTS is a scientific pathfinder to the SKA in the area of cosmic magnetism. Key to magnetism science with the SKA is the technique of RM synthesis. The technique of RM synthesis is introduced and we discuss practical aspects of RM synthesis including efficient computational techniques and detection thresholds in the resulting Faraday spectrum. We illustrate the use of the technique by presenting the current development of the RM synthesis pipeline for GALFACTS and present early results.
  • Detection thresholds in polarized intensity and polarization bias correction are investigated for surveys where the polarization information is obtained from RM synthesis. Considering unresolved sources with a single rotation measure, a detection threshold of $8 \sigma_{QU}$ applied to the Faraday spectrum will retrieve the RM with a false detection rate less than $10^{-4}$, but polarized intensity is more strongly biased than Ricean statistics suggest. For a detection threshold of $5 \sigma_{QU}$, the false detection rate increases to ~4%, depending also on $\lambda^2$ coverage and the extent of the Faraday spectrum. Non-Gaussian noise in Stokes Q and U due to imperfect imaging and calibration can be represented by a distribution that is the sum of a Gaussian and an exponential. The non-Gaussian wings of the noise distribution increase the false detection rate in polarized intensity by orders of magnitude. Monte-Carlo simulations assuming non-Gaussian noise in Q and U, give false detection rates at $8 \sigma_{QU}$ similar to Ricean false detection rates at $4.9 \sigma_{QU}$.
  • The Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory Deep Field polarization study has been matched with the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic survey of the European Large Area Infrared Space Observatory Survey North 1 field. We have used VLA observations with a total intensity rms of 87 microJy beam^-1 to match SWIRE counterparts to the radio sources. Infrared color analysis of our radio sample shows that the majority of polarized sources are elliptical galaxies with an embedded active galactic nucleus. Using available redshift catalogs, we found 429 radio sources of which 69 are polarized with redshifts in the range of 0.04 < z <3.2. We find no correlation between redshift and percentage polarization for our sample. However, for polarized radio sources, we find a weak correlation between increasing percentage polarization and decreasing luminosity.
  • Observational evidence for the existence of cosmic magnetic fields in intergalactic space coherent over Mpc scales is presented. Using an unprecedentedly large sample of Faraday rotation measures of radio sources from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey data and the photometric redshift galaxy catalog from the sixth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we measure the cross-correlations between the rotation measures and the galaxy density field distributed along the source sightlines. It is shown that the rotation measures for sightlines passing through high density regions at separation r >= 1 Mpc/h from the locations of background radio sources are significantly enhanced. We discuss possible generators of this enhancement and interpret it to be intergalactic magnetic fields coherent over 1 Mpc/h with mean field strength B~30 nG.
  • An electromagnetic wave can be uniquely characterized by the four Stokes parameters: I, Q, U, and V. Typical observations in astronomy rely solely on total intensity measurements of the incoming radiation (Stokes I). However, a significant amount of information both about the emitting region and the propagation path is carried in the remaining Stokes parameters. These data provide a means to observe parts of the interstellar medium which remain invisible in Stokes I, at any wavelength. For example, when an electromagnetic wave propagates through a region containing free electrons and a magnetic field, the plane of polarisation of the wave will rotate - an effect recorded only in Stokes Q and U. The interstellar medium of the Galaxy is such a region, containing free electrons (observed as HII) and a magnetic field of a few microgauss. By imaging in Stokes Q and U we are able to observe signatures of magnetic field perturbations from the small scale (tens of pc) to the large scale (kpc). In this paper, we review the status of Canadian polarisation studies of cosmic magnetic fields and discuss the leading role Canada is playing in polarsation studies around the world.
  • We present integrated polarization properties of nearby spiral galaxies at 4.8 GHz, and models for the integrated polarization of spiral galaxy disks as a function of inclination. Spiral galaxies in our sample have observed integrated fractional polarization in the range < 1% to 17.6%. At inclinations less than 50 degrees, the fractional polarization depends mostly on the ratio of random to regular magnetic field strength. At higher inclinations, Faraday depolarization associated with the regular magnetic field becomes more important. The observed degree of polarization is lower (<4%) for more luminous galaxies, in particular those with L_{4.8} > 2 x 10^{21} W/Hz. The polarization angle of the integrated emission is aligned with the apparent minor axis of the disk for galaxies without a bar. In our axially symmetric models, the polarization angle of the integrated emission is independent of wavelength. Simulated distributions of fractional polarization for randomly oriented spiral galaxies at 4.8 GHz and 1.4 GHz are presented. We conclude that polarization measurements, e.g. with the SKA, of unresolved spiral galaxies allow statistical studies of the magnetic field in disk galaxies using large samples in the local universe and at high redshift. As these galaxies behave as idealized background sources without internal Faraday rotation, they can be used to detect large-scale magnetic fields in the intergalactic medium.
  • HI 21cm-line self-absorption (HISA) reveals the shape and distribution of cold atomic clouds in the Galactic disk. Many of these clouds lack corresponding CO emission, despite being colder than purely atomic gas in equilibrium models. HISA requires background line emission at the same velocity, hence mechanisms that can produce such backgrounds. Weak, small-scale, and widespread absorption is likely to arise from turbulent eddies, while strong, large-scale absorption appears organized in cloud complexes along spiral arm shocks. In the latter, the gas may be evolving from an atomic to a molecular state prior to star formation, which would account for the incomplete HISA-CO agreement.
  • The VLA Galactic Plane Survey (VGPS) consists of measurements of the 21cm HI line and 1420 MHz continuum at 1' angular resolution over much of the first quadrant of Galactic longitude within a few degrees of the Galactic plane. In combination with similar surveys of the fourth longitude quadrant and the outer Galaxy made with other instruments, the VGPS will provide comprehensive data on the interstellar medium in most of the regions of active star formation in the Galaxy. This paper describes the parameters of the VGPS, reports on its status, and discusses some early scientific results from the survey.