• Radiation in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray holds clues to the location of the missing baryons, the energetics in stellar feedback processes, and the cosmic enrichment history. Additionally, EUV and soft X-ray photons help determine the ionization state of most intergalactic and circumgalactic metals, shaping the rate at which cosmic gas cools. Unfortunately, this band is extremely difficult to probe observationally due to absorption from the Galaxy. In this paper, we model the contributions of various sources to the cosmic EUV and soft X-ray backgrounds. We bracket the contribution from (1) quasars, (2) X-ray binaries, (3) hot interstellar gas, (4) circumgalactic gas, (5) virialized gas, and (6) supersoft sources, developing models that extrapolate into these bands using both empirical and theoretical inputs. While quasars are traditionally assumed to dominate these backgrounds, we discuss the substantial uncertainty in their contribution. Furthermore, we find that hot intrahalo gases likely emit an O(1) fraction of this radiation at low redshifts, and that interstellar and circumgalactic emission potentially contribute tens of percent to these backgrounds at all redshifts. We estimate that uncertainties in the angular-averaged background intensity impact the ionization corrections for common circumgalactic and intergalactic metal absorption lines by ~0.3-1 dex, and we show that local emissions are comparable to the cosmic background only at r_prox = 10-100 kpc from Milky Way-like galaxies.
  • Observations reveal massive amounts of OVI around star-forming $L_*$ galaxies, with covering fractions of near unity extending to the host halo's virial radius. This OVI absorption is typically kinematically centered upon photoionized gas, with line widths that are suprathermal and kinematically offset from the galaxy. We discuss various scenarios and whether they could result in the observed phenomenology (cooling gas flows, boundary layers, shocks, virialized gas, photoionized clouds in thermal equilibrium). If predominantly collisionally ionized, as we argue is most probable, the OVI observations require that the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of $L_*$ galaxies holds nearly all the associated baryons within a virial radius ($\sim 10^{11}M_\odot$) and hosts massive flows of cooling gas with $\approx30[nT/30{\rm~cm^{-3}K}]~M_\odot~$yr$^{-1}$, which must be largely prevented from accreting onto the host galaxy. Cooling and feedback energetics considerations require $10 <\langle nT\rangle<100{\rm~cm^{-3}K}$ for the warm and hot halo gases. We argue that virialized gas, boundary layers, hot winds, and shocks are unlikely to directly account for the bulk of the OVI. Furthermore, we show that there is a robust constraint on the number density of many of the photoionized $\sim10^4$K absorption systems that yields upper bounds in the range $n<(0.1-3)\times10^{-3}(Z/0.3)$cm$^{-3}$, where $Z$ is the metallicity, suggestive that the dominant pressure in some photoionized clouds is nonthermal. This constraint, which requires minimal ionization modeling, is in accord with the low densities inferred from more complex photoionization modeling. The large amount of cooling gas that is inferred could re-form these clouds in a fraction of the halo dynamical time, as some arguments require, and it requires much of the feedback energy available from supernovae and stellar winds to be dissipated in the CGM.
  • The gas surrounding galaxies outside their disks or interstellar medium and inside their virial radii is known as the circumgalactic medium (CGM). In recent years this component of galaxies has assumed an important role in our understanding of galaxy evolution owing to rapid advances in observational access to this diffuse, nearly invisible material. Observations and simulations of this component of galaxies suggest that it is a multiphase medium characterized by rich dynamics and complex ionization states. The CGM is a source for a galaxy's star-forming fuel, the venue for galactic feedback and recycling, and perhaps the key regulator of the galactic gas supply. We review our evolving knowledge of the CGM with emphasis on its mass, dynamical state, and coevolution with galaxies. Observations from all redshifts and from across the electromagnetic spectrum indicate that CGM gas has a key role in galaxy evolution. We summarize the state of this field and pose unanswered questions for future research.
  • We explore the circumgalactic metal content traced by commonly observed low ion absorbers, including C II, Si II, Si III, Si IV, and Mg II. We use a set of cosmological hydrodynamical zoom simulations run with the EAGLE model and including a non-equilibrium ionization and cooling module that follows 136 ions. The simulations of z~0.2 L* (M_200=10^11.7-10^12.3 Msol) haloes hosting star-forming galaxies and group-sized (M_200=10^12.7-10^13.3 Msol) haloes hosting mainly passive galaxies reproduce key trends observed by the COS-Halos survey-- low ion column densities show 1) little dependence on galaxy specific star formation rate, 2) a patchy covering fraction indicative of 10^4 K clouds with a small volume filling factor, and 3) a declining covering fraction as impact parameter increases from 20-160 kpc. Simulated Si II, Si III, Si IV, C II, and C III column densities show good agreement with observations, while Mg II is under-predicted. Low ions trace a significant metal reservoir, ~10^8 Msol, residing primarily at 10-100 kpc from star-forming and passive central galaxies. These clouds tend to flow inwards and most will accrete onto the central galaxy within the next several Gyr, while a small fraction are entrained in strong outflows. A two-phase structure describes the inner CGM (<0.5 R_200) with low-ion metal clouds surrounded by a hot, ambient medium. This cool phase is separate from the O VI observed by COS-Halos, which arises from the outer CGM (>0.5 R_200) tracing virial temperature gas around L* galaxies. Physical parameters derived from standard photo-ionization modelling of observed column densities (e.g. aligned Si II/Si III absorbers) are validated against our simulations. Our simulations therefore support previous ionization models indicating that cloud covering factors decline while densities and pressures show little variation with increasing impact parameter.
  • The total contribution of diffuse halo gas to the galaxy baryon budget strongly depends on its dominant ionization state. In this paper, we address the physical conditions in the highly ionized circumgalactic medium (CGM) traced by OVI absorption lines observed in COS-Halos spectra. We analyze the observed ionic column densities, absorption-line widths and relative velocities, along with the ratios of NV/OVI for 39 fitted Voigt profile components of OVI. We compare these quantities with the predictions given by a wide range of ionization models. Photoionization models that include only extragalactic UV background radiation are ruled out; conservatively, the upper limits to NV/OVI and measurements of N$_{\rm OVI}$ imply unphysically large path lengths > 100 kpc. Furthermore, very broad OVI absorption (b > 40 km s$^{-1}$) is a defining characteristic of the CGM of star-forming L* galaxies. We highlight two possible origins for the bulk of the observed OVI: (1) highly structured gas clouds photoionized primarily by local high energy sources or (2) gas radiatively cooling on large scales behind a supersonic wind. Approximately 20% of circumgalactic OVI does not align with any low-ionization state gas within $\pm$50 km s$^{-1}$ and is found only in halos with M$_{\rm halo}$ < 10$^{12}$ M$_{\odot}$. We suggest that this type of unmatched OVI absorption traces the hot corona itself at a characteristic temperature of 10$^{5.5}$ K. We discuss the implications of these very distinct physical origins for the dynamical state, gas cooling rates, and total baryonic content of L* gaseous halos.
  • Using Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations of 89 QSO sightlines through the Sloan Digital Sky Survey footprint, we study the relationships between C IV absorption systems and the properties of nearby galaxies as well as large-scale environment. To maintain sensitivity to very faint galaxies, we restrict our sample to 0.0015 < z < 0.015, which defines a complete galaxy survey to L > 0.01 L* or stellar mass log M_* > 8 Msun. We report two principal findings. First, for galaxies with impact parameter rho < 1 rvir, C IV detection strongly depends on the luminosity/stellar mass of the nearby galaxy. C IV is preferentially associated with galaxies with log M_* > 9.5 Msun; lower mass galaxies rarely exhibit significant C IV absorption (covering fraction f = 9 +12-6% for 11 galaxies with log M_* < 9.5 Msun). Second, C IV detection within the log M_* > 9.5 Msun population depends on environment. Using a fixed-aperture environmental density metric for galaxies with rho < 160 kpc at z < 0.055, we find that 57+/-12% (8/14) of galaxies in low-density regions (regions with fewer than seven L > 0.15 L* galaxies within 1.5 Mpc) have affiliated C IV absorption; however, none (0/7) of the galaxies in denser regions show C IV. Similarly, the C IV detection rate is lower for galaxies residing in groups with dark-matter halo masses of log Mhalo > 12.5 Msun. In contrast to C IV, H I is pervasive in the CGM without regard to mass or environment. These results indicate that C IV absorbers with log N(C IV) > 13.5 cm^-2 trace the halos of log M_* > 9.5 Msun galaxies but also reflect larger scale environmental conditions.
  • We develop a new method to constrain the physical conditions in the cool (~10^4 K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) from measurements of ionic column densities, by assuming that the cool CGM spans a large range of gas densities and that small high-density clouds are hierarchically embedded in large low-density clouds. The new method combines the information available from different sightlines during the photoionization modeling, thus yielding tighter constraints on CGM properties compared to traditional methods which model each sightline individually. Applying this new technique to the COS-Halos survey of low-redshift ~L* galaxies, we find that we can reproduce all observed ion columns in all 44 galaxies in the sample, from the low-ions to OVI, with a single universal density structure for the cool CGM. The gas densities span the range 50 < \rho/\rho_mean < 5x10^5 (\rho_mean is the cosmic mean), while the physical size of individual clouds scales as ~\rho^-1, from ~35 kpc of the low density OVI clouds to ~6 pc of the highest density low-ion clouds. The deduced cloud sizes are too small for this density structure to be driven by self-gravity, thus its physical origin is unclear. The implied cool CGM mass within the virial radius is 1.3x10^10 M_sun (~1% of the halo mass), distributed rather uniformly over the four decades in density. The mean cool gas density profile scales as R^-1.0, where R is the distance from the galaxy center. We construct a 3D model of the cool CGM based on our results, which we argue provides a benchmark for the CGM structure in hydrodynamic simulations. Our results can be tested by measuring the coherence scales of different ions.
  • We analyze the mass, temperature, metal enrichment, and OVI abundance of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) around $z\sim 0.2$ galaxies of mass $10^9 M_\odot <M_\bigstar < 10^{11.5} M_\odot$ in the Illustris simulation. Among star-forming galaxies, the mass, temperature, and metallicity of the CGM increase with stellar mass, driving an increase in the OVI column density profile of $\sim 0.5$ dex with each $0.5$ dex increase in stellar mass. Observed OVI column density profiles exhibit a weaker mass dependence than predicted: the simulated OVI abundance profiles are consistent with those observed for star-forming galaxies of mass $M_\bigstar = 10^{10.5-11.5} M_\odot$, but underpredict the observed OVI abundances by $\gtrsim 0.8$ dex for lower-mass galaxies. We suggest that this discrepancy may be alleviated with additional heating of the abundant cool gas in low-mass halos, or with increased numerical resolution capturing turbulent/conductive mixing layers between CGM phases. Quenched galaxies of mass $M_\bigstar = 10^{10.5-11.5} M_\odot$ are found to have 0.3-0.8 dex lower OVI column density profiles than star-forming galaxies of the same mass, in qualitative agreement with the observed OVI abundance bimodality. This offset is driven by AGN feedback, which quenches galaxies by heating the CGM and ejecting significant amounts of gas from the halo. Finally, we find that the inclusion of the central galaxy's radiation field may enhance the photoionization of the CGM within $\sim 50$ kpc, further increasing the predicted OVI abundance around star-forming galaxies.
  • Modern analyses of structure formation predict a universe tangled in a 'cosmic web' of dark matter and diffuse baryons. These theories further predict that at low-z, a significant fraction of the baryons will be shock-heated to $T \sim 10^{5}-10^{7}$K yielding a warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM), but whose actual existence has eluded a firm observational confirmation. We present a novel experiment to detect the WHIM, by targeting the putative filaments connecting galaxy clusters. We use HST/COS to observe a remarkable QSO sightline that passes within $\Delta d = 3$ Mpc from the 7 inter-cluster axes connecting 7 independent cluster-pairs at redshifts $0.1 \le z \le 0.5$. We find tentative excesses of total HI, narrow HI (NLA; Doppler parameters $b<50$ km/s), broad HI (BLA; $b \ge 50$ km/s) and OVI absorption lines within rest-frame velocities of $\Delta v \lesssim 1000$ km/s from the cluster-pairs redshifts, corresponding to $\sim 2$, $\sim 1.7$, $\sim 6$ and $\sim 4$ times their field expectations, respectively. Although the excess of OVI likely comes from gas close to individual galaxies, we conclude that most of the excesses of NLAs and BLAs are truly intergalactic. We find that the covering fractions, $f_c$, of BLAs close to cluster-pairs are $\sim 4-7$ times higher than the random expectation (at the $\sim 2 \sigma$ c.l.), whereas the $f_c$ of NLAs and OVI are not significantly enhanced. We argue that a larger relative excess of BLAs compared to those of NLAs close to cluster-pairs may be a signature of the WHIM in inter-cluster filaments. By extending the present analysis to tens of sightlines our experiment offers a promising route to detect the WHIM.
  • To investigate the evolution of metal-enriched gas over recent cosmic epochs as well as to characterize the diffuse, ionized, metal-enriched circumgalactic medium (CGM), we have conducted a blind survey for C IV absorption systems in 89 QSO sightlines observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). We have identified 42 absorbers at z < 0.16, comprising the largest uniform blind sample size to date in this redshift range. Our measurements indicate an increasing C IV absorber number density per comoving path length (dN/dX = 7.5 +/- 1.1) and modestly increasing mass density relative to the critical density of the Universe (Omega(C IV) = 10.0 +/- 1.5 x 10^-8 ) from z ~ 1.5 to the present epoch, consistent with predictions from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Furthermore, the data support a functional form for the column density distribution function that deviates from a single power-law, also consistent with independent theoretical predictions. As the data also probe heavy element ions in addition to C IV at the same redshifts, we identify, measure, and search for correlations between column densities of these species where components appear aligned in velocity. Among these ion-ion correlations, we find evidence for tight correlations between C II and Si II, C II and Si III, and C IV and Si IV, suggesting that these pairs of species arise in similar ionization conditions. However, the evidence for correlations decreases as the difference in ionization potential increases. Finally, when controlling for observational bias, we find only marginal evidence for a correlation (86.8% likelihood) between the Doppler line width b(C IV) and column density N(C IV).
  • We analyze the low-redshift (z~0.2) circumgalactic medium by comparing absorption-line data from the COS-Halos Survey to absorption around a matched galaxy sample from two cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The models include different prescriptions for galactic outflows, namely hybrid energy/momentum driven wind (ezw), and constant winds (cw). We extract for comparison direct observables including equivalent widths, covering factors, ion ratios, and kinematics. Both wind models are generally in good agreement with these observations for HI and certain low ionization metal lines, but show poorer agreement with higher ionization metal lines including SiIII and OVI that are well-observed by COS-Halos. These discrepancies suggest that both wind models predict too much cool, metal-enriched gas and not enough hot gas, and/or that the metals are not sufficiently well-mixed. This may reflect our model assumption of ejecting outflows as cool and unmixing gas. Our ezw simulation includes a heuristic prescription to quench massive galaxies by super-heating its ISM gas, which we show yields sufficient low ionisation absorption to be broadly consistent with observations, but also substantial OVI absorption that is inconsistent with data, suggesting that gas around quenched galaxies in the real Universe does not cool. At impact parameters of <50 kpc, recycling winds dominate the absorption of low ions and even HI, while OVI almost always arises from metals ejected longer than 1 Gyr ago. The similarity between the wind models is surprising, since we show that they differ substantially in their predicted amount and phase distribution of halo gas. We show that this similarity owes mainly to our comparison here at fixed stellar mass rather than at fixed halo mass in our previous works, which suggests that CGM properties are more closely tied to the stellar mass of galaxies rather than halo mass.
  • We report new observations of circumgalactic gas from the COS-Dwarfs survey, a systematic investigation of the gaseous halos around 43 low-mass z $\leq$ 0.1 galaxies using background QSOs observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. From the projected 1D and 2D distribution of C IV absorption, we find that C IV absorption is detected out to ~ 0.5 R$_{vir}$ of the host galaxies. The C IV absorption strength falls off radially as a power law and beyond 0.5 R$_{vir}$, no C IV absorption is detected above our sensitivity limit of ~ 50-100 m$\AA$. We find a tentative correlation between detected C IV absorption strength and star formation, paralleling the strong correlation seen in highly ionized oxygen for L~L* galaxies by the COS-Halos survey. The data imply a large carbon reservoir in the CGM of these galaxies, corresponding to a minimum carbon mass of $\gtrsim$ 1.2$\times 10^6$ $M_\odot$ out to ~ 110 kpc. This mass is comparable to the carbon mass in the ISM and more than the carbon mass currently in stars of these galaxies. The C IV absorption seen around these sub-L* galaxies can account for almost two-thirds of all $W_r$> 100 m$\AA$ C IV absorption detected at low z. Comparing the C IV covering fraction with hydrodynamical simulations, we find that an energy-driven wind model is consistent with the observations whereas a wind model of constant velocity fails to reproduce the CGM or the galaxy properties.
  • KA1858+4850 is a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy at redshift 0.078 and is among the brightest active galaxies monitored by the Kepler mission. We have carried out a reverberation mapping campaign designed to measure the broad-line region size and estimate the mass of the black hole in this galaxy. We obtained 74 epochs of spectroscopic data using the Kast Spectrograph at the Lick 3-m telescope from February to November of 2012, and obtained complementary V-band images from five other ground-based telescopes. We measured the H-beta light curve lag with respect to the V-band continuum light curve using both cross-correlation techniques (CCF) and continuum light curve variability modeling with the JAVELIN method, and found rest-frame lags of lag_CCF = 13.53 (+2.03, -2.32) days and lag_JAVELIN = 13.15 (+1.08, -1.00) days. The H-beta root-mean-square line profile has a width of sigma_line = 770 +/- 49 km/s. Combining these two results and assuming a virial scale factor of f = 5.13, we obtained a virial estimate of M_BH = 8.06 (+1.59, -1.72) x 10^6 M_sun for the mass of the central black hole and an Eddington ratio of L/L_Edd ~ 0.2. We also obtained consistent but slightly shorter emission-line lags with respect to the Kepler light curve. Thanks to the Kepler mission, the light curve of KA1858+4850 has among the highest cadences and signal-to-noise ratios ever measured for an active galactic nucleus; thus, our black hole mass measurement will serve as a reference point for relations between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics in active galactic nuclei.
  • We analyze the physical conditions of the cool, photoionized (T $\sim 10^4$ K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) using the COS-Halos suite of gas column density measurements for 44 gaseous halos within 160 kpc of $L \sim L^*$ galaxies at $z \sim 0.2$. These data are well described by simple photoionization models, with the gas highly ionized (n$_{\rm HII}$/n$_{\rm H} \gtrsim 99\%$) by the extragalactic ultraviolet background (EUVB). Scaling by estimates for the virial radius, R$_{\rm vir}$, we show that the ionization state (tracked by the dimensionless ionization parameter, U) increases with distance from the host galaxy. The ionization parameters imply a decreasing volume density profile n$_{\rm H}$ = (10$^{-4.2 \pm 0.25}$)(R/R$_{\rm vir})^{-0.8\pm0.3}$. Our derived gas volume densities are several orders of magnitude lower than predictions from standard two-phase models with a cool medium in pressure equilibrium with a hot, coronal medium expected in virialized halos at this mass scale. Applying the ionization corrections to the HI column densities, we estimate a lower limit to the cool gas mass M$_{\rm CGM}^{\rm cool} > 6.5 \times 10^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$ for the volume within R $<$ R$_{\rm vir}$. Allowing for an additional warm-hot, OVI-traced phase, the CGM accounts for at least half of the baryons purported to be missing from dark matter halos at the 10$^{12}$ M$_{\odot}$ scale.
  • We present a budget and accounting of metals in and around star-forming galaxies at $z\sim 0$. We combine empirically derived star formation histories with updated supernova and AGB yields and rates to estimate the total mass of metals produced by galaxies with present-day stellar mass of $10^{9.3}$--$10^{11.6} M_{\odot}$. On the accounting side of the ledger, we show that a surprisingly constant 20--25% mass fraction of produced metals remain in galaxies' stars, interstellar gas and interstellar dust, with little dependence of this fraction on the galaxy stellar mass (omitting those metals immediately locked up in remnants). Thus, the bulk of metals are outside of galaxies, produced in the progenitors of today's $L^*$ galaxies. The COS-Halos survey is uniquely able to measure the mass of metals in the circumgalactic medium (to impact parameters of $< 150$ kpc) of low-redshift $\sim L^*$ galaxies. Using these data, we map the distribution of CGM metals as traced by both the highly ionized OVI ion and a suite of low-ionization species; combined with constraints on circumgalactic dust and hotter X-ray emitting gas out to similar impact parameters, we show that $\sim 40$% of metals produced by $M_{\star}\sim 10^{10}M_{\odot}$ galaxies can be easily accounted for out to 150 kpc. With the current data, we cannot rule out a constant mass of metals within this fixed physical radius. This census provides a crucial boundary condition for the eventual fate of metals in galaxy evolution models.
  • We report the discovery of a transparent sightline at projected distances of {\rho} < 20 kpc to an interacting pair of mature galaxies at z = 0.12. The sightline of the UV-bright quasar PG1522+101 at z = 1.328 passes at {\rho} = 11.5 kpc from the higher-mass galaxy (M_* = 10^10.6 M_Sun) and {\rho} = 20.4 kpc from the lower-mass one (M_* = 10^10.0 M_Sun). The two galaxies are separated by 9 kpc in projected distance and 30 km/s in line-of-sight velocity. Deep optical images reveal tidal features indicative of close interactions. Despite the small projected distances, the quasar sightline shows little absorption associated with the galaxy pair with a total HI column density it no greater than log N(HI) = 13.65. This limiting HI column density is already two orders-of-magnitude less than what is expected from previous halo gas studies. In addition, we detect no heavy-element absorption features associated with the galaxy pair with 3-{\sigma} limits of log N(MgII) < 12.2 and log N(OVI) < 13.7. The probability of seeing such little absorption in a sightline passing at a small projected distance from two non-interacting galaxies is 0.2%. The absence of strong absorbers near the close galaxy pair suggests that the cool gas reservoirs of the galaxies have been significantly depleted by the galaxy interaction. These observations therefore underscore the potential impact of galaxy interactions on the gaseous halos around galaxies.
  • Studies of QSO absorber-galaxy connections are often hindered by inadequate information on whether faint/dwarf galaxies are located near the QSO sight lines. To investigate the contribution of faint galaxies to QSO absorber populations, we are conducting a deep galaxy redshift survey near low-z C IV absorbers. Here we report a blindly-detected C IV absorption system (z(abs) = 0.00348) in the spectrum of PG1148+549 that appears to be associated either with an edge-on dwarf galaxy with an obvious disk (UGC 6894, z(gal) = 0.00283) at an impact parameter of rho = 190 kpc or with a very faint dwarf irregular galaxy at rho = 23 kpc, which is closer to the sightline but has a larger redshift difference (z(gal) = 0.00107, i.e., dv = 724 km/s). We consider various gas/galaxy associations, including infall and outflows. Based on current theoretical models, we conclude that the absorber is most likely tracing (1) the remnants of an outflow from a previous epoch, a so-called 'ancient outflow', or (2) intergalactic gas accreting onto UGC 6894, 'cold mode' accretion. The latter scenario is supported by H I synthesis imaging data that shows the rotation curve of the disk being codirectional with the velocity offset between UGC 6894 and the absorber, which is located almost directly along the major axis of the edge-on disk.
  • We study the high-ionization phase and kinematics of the circumgalactic medium around low-redshift galaxies using a sample of 23 Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs) at 0.08<z<0.93 observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. In Lehner et al. (2013), we recently showed that low-z LLSs have a bimodal metallicity distribution. Here we extend that analysis to search for differences between the high-ion and kinematic properties of the metal-poor and metal-rich branches. We find that metal-rich LLSs tend to show higher O VI columns and broader O VI profiles than metal-poor LLSs. The total H I line width (dv90 statistic) in LLSs is not correlated with metallicity, indicating that the H I kinematics alone cannot be used to distinguish inflow from outflow and gas recycling. Among the 17 LLSs with O VI detections, all but two show evidence of kinematic sub-structure, in the form of O VI-H I centroid offsets, multiple components, or both. Using various scenarios for how the metallicity in the high-ion and low-ion phases of each LLS compare, we constrain the ionized hydrogen column in the O VI phase to lie in the range log N(H II)~17.6-20. The O VI phase of LLSs is a substantial baryon reservoir, with M(high-ion)~10^{8.5-10.9}(r/150 kpc)^2 solar masses, similar to the mass in the low-ion phase. Accounting for the O VI phase approximately doubles the contribution of low-z LLSs to the cosmic baryon budget.
  • Using high resolution, high signal-to-noise ultraviolet spectra of the z = 0.9754 quasar PG1148+549 obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, we study the physical conditions and abundances of NeVIII+OVI absorption line systems at z(abs) =0.68381, 0.70152, 0.72478. In addition to NeVIII and OVI, absorption lines from multiple ionization stages of oxygen (OII, OIII, OIV) are detected and are well-aligned with the more highly ionized species. We show that these absorbers are multiphase systems including hot gas (T ~ 10^{5.7} K) that produces NeVIII and OVI, and the gas metallicity of the cool phase ranges from Z = 0.3 Z_{solar} to supersolar. The cool (~10^{4} K) phases have densities n_{H} ~ 10^{-4} cm^{-3} and small sizes (< 4kpc); these cool clouds are likely to expand and dissipate, and the NeVIII may be within a transition layer between the cool gas and a surrounding, much hotter medium. The NeVIII redshift density, dN/dz = 7^{+7}_{-3}, requires a large number of these clouds for every L > 0.1L* galaxy and a large effective absorption cross section (>~ 100 kpc), and indeed, we find a star forming ~L* galaxy at the redshift of the z(abs)=0.72478 system, at an impact parameter of 217 kpc. Multiphase absorbers like these NeVIII systems are likely to be an important reservoir of baryons and metals in the circumgalactic media of galaxies.
  • We report new observations of circumgalactic gas in the halos of early type galaxies obtained by the COS-Halos Survey with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We find that detections of HI surrounding early type galaxies are typically as common and strong as around star-forming galaxies, implying that the total mass of circumgalactic material is comparable in the two populations. For early type galaxies, the covering fraction for HI absorption above 10^16 cm^2 is ~40-50% within ~150 kpc. Line widths and kinematics of the detected material show it to be cold (T ~< 10^5 K) in comparison to the virial temperature of the host halos. The implied masses of cool, photoionized CGM baryons may be up to 10^9 --- 10^11 Msun. Contrary to some theoretical expectations, strong halo HI absorbers do not disappear as part of the quenching of star-formation. Even passive galaxies retain significant reservoirs of halo baryons which could replenish the interstellar gas reservoir and eventually form stars. This halo gas may feed the diffuse and molecular gas that is frequently observed inside ETGs.
  • The circumgalactic medium (CGM) is fed by galaxy outflows and accretion of intergalactic gas, but its mass, heavy element enrichment, and relation to galaxy properties are poorly constrained by observations. In a survey of the outskirts of 42 galaxies with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope, we detected ubiquitous, large (150 kiloparsec) halos of ionized oxygen surrounding star-forming galaxies, but we find much less ionized oxygen around galaxies with little or no star formation. This ionized CGM contains a substantial mass of heavy elements and gas, perhaps far exceeding the reservoirs of gas in the galaxies themselves. It is a basic component of nearly all star-forming galaxies that is removed or transformed during the quenching of star formation and the transition to passive evolution.
  • Outflowing winds of multiphase plasma have been proposed to regulate the buildup of galaxies, but key aspects of these outflows have not been probed with observations. Using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, we show that "warm-hot" plasma at 10^{5.5} K contains 10-150 times more mass than the cold gas in a poststarburst galaxy wind. This wind extends to distances >68 kiloparsecs, and at least some portion of it will escape. Moreover, the kinematical correlation of the cold and warm-hot phases indicates that the warm-hot plasma is related to the interaction of the cold matter with a hotter (unseen) phase at >>10^{6} K. Such multiphase winds can remove substantial masses and alter the evolution of poststarburst galaxies.
  • We present UV and optical observations from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope and Keck of a z= 0.27395 Lyman limit system (LLS) seen in absorption against the QSO PG1630+377. We detect H I absorption with log N(HI)=17.06\pm0.05 as well as Mg II, C III, Si III, and O VI in this system. The column densities are readily explained if this is a multi-phase system, with the intermediate and low ions arising in a very low metallicity ([Mg/ H] =-1.71 \pm 0.06) photoionized gas. We identify via Keck spectroscopy and Large Binocular Telescope imaging a 0.3 L_* star-forming galaxy projected 37 kpc from the QSO at nearly identical redshift (z=0.27406, \Delta v = -26 \kms) with near solar metallicity ([O/ H]=-0.20 \pm 0.15). The presence of very low metallicity gas in the proximity of a near-solar metallicity, sub-L_* galaxy strongly suggests that the LLS probes gas infalling onto the galaxy. A search of the literature reveals that such low metallicity LLSs are not uncommon. We found that 50% (4/8) of the well-studied z < 1 LLSs have metallicities similar to the present system and show sub-L_* galaxies with rho < 100 kpc in those fields where redshifts have been surveyed. We argue that the properties of these primitive LLSs and their host galaxies are consistent with those of cold mode accretion streams seen in galaxy simulations.
  • We present high signal-to-noise optical spectra for 67 low-redshift (0.1 < z < 0.4) galaxies that lie within close projected distances (5 kpc < rho < 150 kpc) of 38 background UV-bright QSOs. The Keck LRIS and Magellan MagE data presented here are part of a survey that aims to construct a statistically sampled map of the physical state and metallicity of gaseous galaxy halos using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We provide a detailed description of the optical data reduction and subsequent spectral analysis that allow us to derive the physical properties of this uniquely data-rich sample of galaxies. The galaxy sample is divided into 38 pre-selected L ~ L*, z ~ 0.2 "target" galaxies and 29 "bonus" galaxies that lie in close proximity to the QSO sightlines. We report galaxy spectroscopic redshifts accurate to +/- 30 km s-1, impact parameters, rest-frame colors, stellar masses, total star formation rates, and gas-phase interstellar medium oxygen abundances. When we compare the distribution of these galaxy characteristics to those of the general low-redshift population, we find good agreement. The L ~ L* galaxies in this sample span a diverse range of color (1.0 < u-r < 3.0), stellar mass (10^9.5 < M/M_sun < 10^11.5), and SFRs (0.01 - 20 M_sun yr-1). These optical data, along with the COS UV spectroscopy, comprise the backbone of our efforts to understand how halo gas properties may correlate with their host galaxy properties, and ultimately to uncover the processes that drive gas outflow and/or are influenced by gas inflow.
  • We present optical emission-line spectra for outlying HII regions in the extended neutral gas disk surrounding the blue compact dwarf galaxy NGC 2915. Using a combination of strong-line R23 and direct oxygen abundance measurements, we report a flat, possibly increasing, metallicity gradient out to 1.2 times the Holmberg radius. We find the outer-disk of NGC 2915 to be enriched to a metallicity of 0.4 Z_solar. An analysis of the metal yields shows that the outer disk of NGC 2915 is overabundant for its gas fraction, while the central star-foming core is similarly under-abundant for its gas fraction. Star formation rates derived from very deep ~14 ks GALEX FUV exposures indicate that the low-level of star formation observed at large radii is not sufficient to have produced the measured oxygen abundances at these galactocentric distances. We consider 3 plausible mechanisms that may explain the metal-enriched outer gaseous disk of NGC 2915: radial redistribution of centrally generated metals, strong galactic winds with subsequent fallback, and galaxy accretion. Our results have implications for the physical origin of the mass-metallicity relation for gas-rich dwarf galaxies.