• We present Spitzer Space Telescope archival mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectroscopy of a sample of eleven planetary nebulae (PNe). The observations, acquired with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), cover the spectral range 5.2-14.5 {\mu}m that includes the H2 0-0 S(2) to S(7) rotational emission lines. This wavelength coverage has allowed us to derive the Boltzmann distribution and calculate the H2 rotational excitation temperature (Tex). The derived excitation temperatures have consistent values ~900+/-70 K for different sources despite their different structural components. We also report the detection of mid-IR ionic lines of [Ar III], [S IV], and [Ne II] in most objects, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features in a few cases. The decline of the [Ar III]/[Ne II] line ratio with the stellar effective temperature can be explained either by a true neon enrichment or by high density circumstellar regions of PNe that presumably descend from higher mass progenitor stars.
  • Planetary nebulae (PNe) are expected to have a ~10$^{5}$ K interface layer between the $\geq$10$^{6}$ K inner hot bubble and the ~10$^{4}$ K optical nebular shell. The PN structure and evolution, and the X-ray emission depend critically on the efficiency of mixing of material at this interface layer. However, neither its location nor its spatial extent has ever been determined so far. Using high-spatial resolution HST STIS spectroscopic observations of the N V 1239,1243 lines in the Cat's Eye Nebula (NGC 6543), we have detected this interface layer and determined its location, extent, and physical properties for the first time in a PN. We confirm that this interface layer, as revealed by the spatial distribution of the N V 1239 line emission, is located between the hot bubble and the optical nebular shell. We estimate a thickness of 1.5$\times$10$^{16}$ cm and an electron density of ~200 cm$^{-3}$ for the mixing layer. With a thermal pressure of ~2$\times$10$^{-8}$ dyn cm$^{-2}$, the mixing layer is in pressure equilibrium with the hot bubble and ionized nebular rim of NGC 6543.
  • Motivated by recent numerical simulations of molecular cloud (MC)evolution, in which the clouds engage in global gravitational contraction, and local collapse events culminate significantly earlier than the global collapse, we investigate the growth of density perturbations embedded in a collapsing background, to which we refer as an Inverse Hubble Flow (IHF). We use the standard procedure for the growth of perturbations in a universe that first expands (the usual Hubble Flow) and then recollapses (the IHF). We find that linear density perturbations immersed in an IHF grow faster than perturbations evolving in a static background (the standard Jeans analysis). A fundamental distinction between the two regimes is that, in the Jeans case, the time $\tau_\mathrm{nl}$ for a density fluctuation to become nonlinear increases without limit as its initial value approaches zero, while in the IHF case $\tau_\mathrm{nl} \le \tau_\mathrm{ff}$ always, where $\tau_\mathrm{ff}$ is the free-fall time of the background density. We suggest that this effect, although moderate, implies that small-scale density fluctuations embedded in globally-collapsing clouds must collapse earlier than their parent cloud, regardless of whether the initial amplitude of the fluctuations is moderate or strongly nonlinear, thus allowing the classical mechanism of Hoyle fragmentation to operate in multi-Jeans-mass MCs. More fundamentally, our results show that, contrary to the standard paradigm that fluctuations of all scales grow at the same rate in the linear regime, the hierarchical nesting of the fluctuations of different scales does affect their growth even in the linear stage.
  • We analyze the expansion of hydrogen-poor knots and filaments in the born-again planetary nebulae A30 and A78 based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained almost 20 yr apart. The proper motion of these features generally increases with distance to the central star, but the fractional expansion decreases, i.e., the expansion is not homologous. As a result, there is not a unique expansion age, which is estimated to be 610-950 yr for A30 and 600-1140 yr for A78. The knots and filaments have experienced complex dynamical processes: the current fast stellar wind is mass loaded by the material ablated from the inner knots; the ablated material is then swept up until it shocks the inner edges of the outer, hydrogen-rich nebula. The angular expansion of the outer filaments shows a clear dependence on position angle, indicating that the interaction of the stellar wind with the innermost knots channels the wind along preferred directions. The apparent angular expansion of the innermost knots seems to be dominated by the rocket effect of evaporating gas and by the propagation of the ionization front inside them. Radiation-hydrodynamical simulations show that a single ejection of material followed by a rapid onset of the stellar wind and ionizing flux can reproduce the variety of clumps and filaments at different distances from the central star found in A30 and A78.
  • Molecular clouds often exhibit filamentary or sheet-like shapes. We compute the free-fall time ($\tff$) for finite, uniform, self-gravitating circular sheets and filamentary clouds of small but finite thickness, so that their volume density $\rho$ can still be defined. We find that, for thin sheets, the free-fall time is larger than that of a uniform sphere with the same volume density by a factor proportional to $\sqrt{A}$, where the aspect ratio $A$ is given by $A=R/h$, $R$ being the sheet's radius and $h$ is its thickness. For filamentary clouds, the aspect ratio is defined as $A=L/\calR$, where $L$ is the filament's half length and $\calR$ is its (small) radius, and the modification factor is a more complicated, although in the limit of large $A$ it again reduces to nearly $\sqrt{A}$. We propose that our result for filamentary shapes naturally explains the ubiquitous configuration of clumps fed by filaments observed in the densest structures of molecular clouds. Also, the longer free-fall times for non-spherical geometries in general may contribute towards partially alleviating the "star-formation conundrum", namely, that the star formation rate in the Galaxy appears to be proceeding in a timescale much larger than the total molecular mass in the Galaxy divided by its typical free-fall time. If molecular clouds are in general formed by thin sheets and long filaments, then their relevant free-fall time may have been systematically underestimated, possibly by factors of up to one order of magnitude.