• We employ isolated N-body simulations to study the response of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) halos in the presence of the baryonic potentials. Dark matter self-interactions lead to kinematic thermalization in the inner halo, resulting in a tight correlation between the dark matter and baryon distributions. A deep baryonic potential shortens the phase of SIDM core expansion and triggers core contraction. This effect can be further enhanced by a large self-scattering cross section. We find the final SIDM density profile is sensitive to the baryonic concentration and the strength of dark matter self-interactions. Assuming a spherical initial halo, we also study evolution of the SIDM halo shape together with the density profile. The halo shape at later epochs deviates from spherical symmetry due to the influence of the non-spherical disc potential, and its significance depends on the baryonic contribution to the total gravitational potential, relative to the dark matter one. In addition, we construct a multi-component model for the Milky Way, including an SIDM halo, a stellar disc and a bulge, and show it is consistent with observations from stellar kinematics and streams.
  • We perform dark-matter-only simulations of 28 relaxed massive cluster-sized haloes for Cold Dark Matter (CDM) and Self-Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) models, to study structural differences between the models at large radii, where the impact of baryonic physics is expected to be very limited. We find that the distributions for the radial profiles of the density, ellipsoidal axis ratios, and velocity anisotropies ($\beta$) of the haloes differ considerably between the models (at the $\sim1\sigma$ level), even at $\gtrsim10\%$ of the virial radius, if the self-scattering cross section is $\sigma/m_\chi=1$ cm$^2$ gr$^{-1}$. Direct comparison with observationally inferred density profiles disfavours SIDM for $\sigma/m_\chi=1$ cm$^2$ gr$^{-1}$, but in an intermediate radial range ($\sim3\%$ of the virial radius), where the impact of baryonic physics is uncertain. At this level of the cross section, we find a narrower $\beta$ distribution in SIDM, clearly skewed towards isotropic orbits, with no SIDM (90\% of CDM) haloes having $\beta>0.12$ at $7\%$ of the virial radius. We estimate that with an observational sample of $\sim30$ ($\sim10^{15}$ M$_\odot$) relaxed clusters, $\beta$ can potentially be used to put competitive constraints on SIDM, once observational uncertainties improve by a factor of a few. We study the suppression of the memory of halo assembly history in SIDM clusters. For $\sigma/m_\chi=1$ cm$^2$ gr$^{-1}$, we find that this happens only in the central halo regions ($\sim1/4$ of the scale radius of the halo), and only for haloes that assembled their mass within this region earlier than a formation redshift $z_f\sim2$. Otherwise, the memory of assembly remains and is reflected in ways similar to CDM, albeit with weaker trends.
  • As a binary pulsar moves through a wind of dark matter particles, the resulting dynamical friction modifies the binary's orbit. We study this effect for the double disk dark matter (DDDM) scenario, where a fraction of the dark matter is dissipative and settles into a thin disk. For binaries within the dark disk, this effect is enhanced due to the higher dark matter density and lower velocity dispersion of the dark disk, and due to its co-rotation with the baryonic disk.We estimate the effect and compare it with observations for two different limits in the Knudsen number ($Kn$). First, in the case where DDDM is effectively collisionless within the characteristic scale of the binary ($Kn\gg1$) and ignoring the possible interaction between the pair of dark matter wakes. Second, in the fully collisional case ($Kn\ll1$), where a fluid description can be adopted and the interaction of the pair of wakes is taken into account. We find that the change in the orbital period is of the same order of magnitude in both limits. A comparison with observations reveals good prospects to probe currently allowed DDDM models with timing data from binary pulsars in the near future. We finally comment on the possibility of extending the analysis to the intermediate (rarefied gas) case with $Kn\sim1$.
  • We formulate an effective theory of structure formation (ETHOS) that enables cosmological structure formation to be computed in almost any microphysical model of dark matter physics. This framework maps the detailed microphysical theories of particle dark matter interactions into the physical effective parameters that shape the linear matter power spectrum and the self-interaction transfer cross section of non-relativistic dark matter. These are the input to structure formation simulations, which follow the evolution of the cosmological and galactic dark matter distributions. Models with similar effective parameters in ETHOS but with different dark particle physics would nevertheless result in similar dark matter distributions. We present a general method to map an ultraviolet complete or effective field theory of low energy dark matter physics into parameters that affect the linear matter power spectrum and carry out this mapping for several representative particle models. We further propose a simple but useful choice for characterizing the dark matter self-interaction transfer cross section that parametrizes self-scattering in structure formation simulations. Taken together, these effective parameters in ETHOS allow the classification of dark matter theories according to their structure formation properties rather than their intrinsic particle properties, paving the way for future simulations to span the space of viable dark matter physics relevant for structure formation.
  • We present a theoretical analysis of some unexplored aspects of relaxed Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter (BECDM) haloes. This type of ultralight bosonic scalar field dark matter is a viable alternative to the standard cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm, as it makes the same large-scale predictions as CDM and potentially overcomes CDM's small-scale problems via a galaxy-scale de Broglie wavelength. We simulate BECDM halo formation through mergers, evolved under the Schr\"odinger-Poisson equations. The formed haloes consist of a soliton core supported against gravitational collapse by the quantum pressure tensor and an asymptotic $r^{-3}$ NFW-like profile. We find a fundamental relation of the core=to-halo mass with the dimensionless invariant $\Xi \equiv \lvert E \rvert/M^3/(Gm/\hbar)^2$ or $M_{\rm c}/M \simeq 2.6 \Xi^{1/3}$, linking the soliton to global halo properties. For $r \geq 3.5 \,r_{\rm c}$ core radii, we find equipartition between potential, classical kinetic, and quantum gradient energies. The haloes also exhibit a conspicuous turbulent behavior driven by the continuous reconnection of vortex lines due to wave interference. We analyse the turbulence 1D velocity power spectrum and find a $k^{-1.1}$ power-law. This suggests the vorticity in BECDM haloes is homogeneous, similar to thermally-driven counterflow BEC systems from condensed matter physics, in contrast to a $k^{-5/3}$ Kolmogorov power-law seen in mechanically-driven quantum systems. The mode where the power spectrum peaks is approximately the soliton width, implying the soliton-sized granules carry most of the turbulent energy in BECDM haloes.
  • We explore for the first time the effect of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) on the dark matter (DM) and baryonic distribution in massive galaxies formed in hydrodynamical cosmological simulations, including explicit baryonic physics treatment. A novel implementation of Super-Massive Black Hole (SMBH) formation and evolution is used, as in Tremmel et al.(2015, 2016), allowing to explicitly follow SMBH dynamics at the center of galaxies. A high SIDM constant cross-section is chosen, $\sigma$=10 $\rm cm^2/gr$, to amplify differences from CDM models. Milky Way-like galaxies form a shallower DM density profile in SIDM than they do in CDM, with differences already at 20 kpc scales. This demonstrates that even for the most massive spirals the effect of SIDM dominates over the adiabatic contraction due to baryons. Strikingly, the dynamics of SMBHs differs in the SIDM and reference CDM case. SMBHs in massive spirals have sunk to the centre of their host galaxy in both the SIDM and CDM run, while in less massive galaxies about 80$\%$ of the SMBH population is off-centered in the SIDM case, as opposed to the CDM case in which $\sim$90$\%$ of SMBHs have reached their host's centre. SMBHs are found as far as $\sim$9 kpc away from the centre of their host SIDM galaxy. This difference is due to the increased dynamical friction timescale caused by the lower DM density in SIDM galaxies compared to CDM, resulting in 'core stalling'. This pilot work highlights the importance of simulating in a full hydrodynamical context different DM models combined to SMBH physics to study their influence on galaxy formation.
  • Galactic rotation curves are a fundamental constraint for any cosmological model. We use controlled N-body simulations of galaxies to study the gravitational effect of baryons in a scenario with collisionless cold dark matter (CDM) versus one with a self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) component. In particular, we examine the inner profiles of the rotation curves in the velocity range Vmax = 30-250 km/s, whose diversity has been found to be greater than predicted by the Lambda-CDM scenario. We find that the scatter in the observed rotation curves exceeds that predicted by dark matter only mass-concentration relations in either the CDM nor SIDM models. Allowing for realistic baryonic content and spatial distributions, however, helps create a large variety of rotation curve shapes; which is in better agreement with observations in the case of self-interactions due to the characteristic cored profiles being more accommodating to the slowly rising rotation curves than CDM. We find individual fits to model two of the most remarkable outliers of similar Vmax, UGC 5721 and IC 2574, the former a cusp-like rotation curve and the latter a seemingly 8 kpc cored profile. This diversity in SIDM arises as permutations of overly concentrated halos with compact baryonic distributions versus underdense halos with extended baryonic disks. The SIDM solution is promising and its feasibility ultimately depends on the sampling of the halo mass-concentration relation and its interplay with the baryonic profiles, emphasising the need for a better understanding of the frequency of extreme outliers present in current observational samples.
  • The gravitationally-lensed galaxy A1689-zD1 is one of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed sources ($z=7.5$). It is the earliest known galaxy where the interstellar medium (ISM) has been detected; dust emission was detected with the Atacama Large Millimetre Array (ALMA). A1689-zD1 is also unusual among high-redshift dust emitters as it is a sub-L* galaxy and is therefore a good prospect for the detection of gaseous ISM in a more typical galaxy at this redshift. We observed A1689-zD1 with ALMA in bands 6 and 7 and with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in band $Q$. To study the structure of A1689-zD1, we map the mm thermal dust emission and find two spatial components with sizes about $0.4-1.7$\,kpc (lensing-corrected). The rough spatial morphology is similar to what is observed in the near-infrared with {\it HST} and points to a perturbed dynamical state, perhaps indicative of a major merger or a disc in early formation. The ALMA photometry is used to constrain the far-infrared spectral energy distribution, yielding a dust temperature ($T_{\rm dust} \sim 35$--$45$\,K for $\beta = 1.5-2$). We do not detect the CO(3-2) line in the GBT data with a 95\% upper limit of 0.3\,mJy observed. We find a slight excess emission in ALMA band~6 at 220.9\,GHz. If this excess is real, it is likely due to emission from the [CII] 158.8\,$\mu$m line at $z_{\rm [CII]} = 7.603$. The stringent upper limits on the [CII]/$L_{\rm FIR}$ luminosity ratio suggest a [CII] deficit similar to several bright quasars and massive starbursts.
  • The isotropic gamma-ray background arises from the contribution of unresolved sources, including members of confirmed source classes and proposed gamma-ray emitters such as the radiation induced by dark matter annihilation and decay. Clues about the properties of the contributing sources are imprinted in the anisotropy characteristics of the gamma-ray background. We use 81 months of Pass 7 Reprocessed data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to perform a measurement of the anisotropy angular power spectrum of the gamma-ray background. We analyze energies between 0.5 and 500 GeV, extending the range considered in the previous measurement based on 22 months of data. We also compute, for the first time, the cross-correlation angular power spectrum between different energy bins. We find that the derived angular spectra are compatible with being Poissonian, i.e. constant in multipole. Moreover, the energy dependence of the anisotropy suggests that the signal is due to two populations of sources, contributing, respectively, below and above 2 GeV. Finally, using data from state-of-the-art numerical simulations to model the dark matter distribution, we constrain the contribution from dark matter annihilation and decay in Galactic and extragalactic structures to the measured anisotropy. These constraints are competitive with those that can be derived from the average intensity of the isotropic gamma-ray background. Data are available at https://www-glast.stanford.edu/pub_data/552.
  • We investigate the effects of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) on the tidal stripping and evaporation of satellite galaxies in a Milky Way-like host. We use a suite of five zoom-in, dark-matter-only simulations, two with velocity-independent SIDM cross sections, two with velocity-dependent SIDM cross sections, and one cold dark matter simulation for comparison. After carefully assigning stellar mass to satellites at infall, we find that stars are stripped at a higher rate in SIDM than in CDM. In contrast, the total bound dark matter mass loss rate is minimally affected, with subhalo evaporation having negligible effects on satellites for viable SIDM models. Centrally located stars in SIDM haloes disperse out to larger radii as cores grow. Consequently, the half-light radius of satellites increases, stars become more vulnerable to tidal stripping, and the stellar mass function is suppressed. We find that the ratio of core radius to tidal radius accurately predicts the relative strength of enhanced SIDM stellar stripping. Velocity-independent SIDM models show a modest increase in the stellar stripping effect with satellite mass, whereas velocity-dependent SIDM models show a large increase in this effect towards lower masses, making observations of ultra-faint dwarfs prime targets for distinguishing between and constraining SIDM models. Due to small cores in the largest satellites of velocity-dependent SIDM, no identifiable imprint is left on the all-sky properties of the stellar halo. While our results focus on SIDM, the main physical mechanism of enhanced tidal stripping of stars apply similarly to satellites with cores formed via other means.
  • Dark matter annihilation or decay could have a significant impact on the ionisation and thermal history of the universe. In this paper, we study the potential contribution of dark matter annihilation (s-wave- or p-wave-dominated) or decay to cosmic reionisation, via the production of electrons, positrons and photons. We map out the possible perturbations to the ionisation and thermal histories of the universe due to dark matter processes, over a broad range of velocity-averaged annihilation cross-sections/decay lifetimes and dark matter masses. We have employed recent numerical studies of the efficiency with which annihilation/decay products induce heating and ionization in the intergalactic medium, and in this work extended them down to a redshift of $1+z = 4$ for two different reionisation scenarios. We also improve on earlier studies by using the results of detailed structure formation models of dark matter haloes and subhaloes that are consistent with up-to-date $N$-body simulations, with estimates on the uncertainties that originate from the smallest scales. We find that for dark matter models that are consistent with experimental constraints, a contribution of more than 10% to the ionisation fraction at reionisation is disallowed for all annihilation scenarios. Such a contribution is possible only for decays into electron/positron pairs, for light dark matter with mass $m_\chi \lesssim $ 100 MeV, and a decay lifetime $\tau_\chi \sim 10^{24} - 10^{25}$ s.
  • We have recently introduced a novel statistical measure of dark matter clustering in phase space, the particle phase space average density ($P^2SAD$). In a two-paper series, we studied the structure of $P^2SAD$ in the Milky-Way-size Aquarius haloes, constructed a physically motivated model to describe it, and illustrated its potential as a powerful tool to predict signals sensitive to the nanostructure of dark matter haloes. In this letter, we report a remarkable universality of the clustering of dark matter in phase space as measured by $P^2SAD$ within the subhaloes of host haloes across different environments covering a range from dwarf-size to cluster-size haloes ($10^{10}-10^{15}$ M$_\odot$). Simulations show that the universality of $P^2SAD$ holds for more than 7 orders of magnitude, over a 2D phase space, covering over 3 orders of magnitude in distance/velocity, with a simple functional form that can be described by our model. Invoking the universality of $P^2SAD$, we can accurately predict the non-linear power spectrum of dark matter at small scales all the way down to the decoupling mass limit of cold dark matter particles. As an application, we compute the subhalo boost to the annihilation of dark matter in a wide range of host halo masses.
  • We explore the co-evolution of the specific angular momentum of dark matter haloes and the cold baryons that comprise the galaxies within. We study over two thousand central galaxies within the reference cosmological hydrodynamical simulation of the "Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments" (EAGLE) project. We employ a methodology within which the evolutionary history of a system is specified by the time-evolving properties of the Lagrangian particles that define it at z=0. We find a strong correlation between the evolution of the specific angular momentum of today's stars (cold gas) and that of the inner (whole) dark matter halo they are associated with. This link is particularly strong for the stars formed before the epoch of maximum expansion and subsequent collapse of the central dark matter halo (turnaround). Spheroids are typically assembled primarily from stars formed prior to turnaround, and are therefore destined to suffer a net loss of angular momentum associated with the strong merging activity during the assembly of the inner dark matter halo. Stellar discs retain their specific angular momentum since they are comprised of stars formed mainly after turnaround, from gas that mostly preserves the high specific angular momentum it acquired by tidal torques during the linear growth of the halo. Since the specific angular momentum loss of the stars is tied to the galaxy's morphology today, it may be possible to use our results to predict, statistically, the assembly history of a halo given the morphology of the galaxy it hosts.
  • The IceCube Neutrino Observatory has observed highly energetic neutrinos in excess of the expected atmospheric neutrino background. It is intriguing to consider the possibility that such events are probing physics beyond the standard model. In this context, $\mathcal{O}$(PeV) dark matter particles decaying to neutrinos have been considered while dark matter annihilation has been dismissed invoking the unitarity bound as a limiting factor. However, the latter claim was done ignoring the contribution from dark matter substructure, which for PeV Cold Dark Matter would extend down to a free streaming mass of $\mathcal{O}$($10^{-18}$M$_\odot$). Since the unitarity bound is less stringent at low velocities, ($\sigma_{\rm ann}$v)$\leq4\pi/m_\chi^2v$, then, it is possible that these cold and dense subhalos would contribute dominantly to a dark-matter-induced neutrino flux and easily account for the events observed by IceCube. A Sommerfeld-enhanced dark matter model can naturally support such scenario. Interestingly, the spatial distribution of the events shows features that would be expected in a dark matter interpretation. Although not conclusive, 9 of the 37 events appear to be clustered around a region near the Galactic Center while 6 others spatially coincide, within the reported angular errors, with 5 of 26 Milky Way satellites. However, a simple estimate of the probability of the latter occurring by chance is $\sim35\%$. More events are needed to statistically test this hypothesis. PeV dark matter particles are massive enough that their abundance as standard thermal relics would overclose the Universe. This issue can be solved in alternative scenarios, for instance if the decay of new massive unstable particles generates significant entropy reheating the Universe to a slightly lower temperature than the freeze-out temperature, $T_{\rm RH} \lesssim T_{\rm f}\sim4\times10^4$~GeV.
  • We demonstrate that self-interacting dark matter models with interactions mediated by light particles can have significant deviations in the matter power-spectrum and detailed structure of galactic halos when compared to a standard cold dark matter scenario. While these deviations can take the form of suppression of small scale structure that are in some ways similar to that of warm dark matter, the self-interacting models have a much wider range of possible phenomenology. A long-range force in the dark matter can introduce multiple scales to the initial power spectrum, in the form of dark acoustic oscillations and an exponential cut-off in the power spectrum. Using simulations we show that the impact of these scales can remain observationally relevant up to the present day. Furthermore, the self-interaction can continue to modify the small-scale structure of the dark matter halos, reducing their central densities and creating a dark matter core. The resulting phenomenology is unique to this type of models.
  • We combine the detailed Star Formation Histories of the Fornax and Sculptor dwarf Spheroidals with the Mass Assembly History of their dark matter (DM) halo progenitors to estimate if the energy deposited by Supernova type II (SNeII) is sufficient to create a substantial DM core. Assuming the efficiency of energy injection of the SNeII into DM particles is $\epsilon_{\rm gc}=0.05$, we find that a single early episode, $z \gtrsim z_{\rm infall}$, that combines the energy of all SNeII due to explode over 0.5 Gyr, is sufficient to create a core of several hundred parsecs in both Sculptor and Fornax. Therefore, our results suggest that it is energetically plausible to form cores in Cold Dark Matter (CDM) halos via early episodic gas outflows triggered by SNeII. Furthermore, based on CDM merger rates and phase-space density considerations, we argue that the probability of a subsequent complete regeneration of the cusp is small for a substantial fraction of dwarf-size haloes.
  • We study the effect of baryons on the abundance of structures and substructures in a Lambda-CDM cosmology, using a pair of high resolution cosmological simulations from the GIMIC project. Both simulations use identical initial conditions, but while one contains only dark matter, the other also includes baryons. We find that gas pressure, reionisation, supernova feedback, stripping, and truncated accretion systematically reduce the total mass and the abundance of structures below ~10^12 solar masses compared to the pure dark matter simulation. Taking this into account and adopting an appropriate detection threshold lowers the abundance of observed galaxies with maximum circular velocities below 100 km/s, significantly reducing the reported discrepancy between Lambda-CDM and the measured HI velocity function of the ALFALFA survey. We also show that the stellar-to-total mass ratios of galaxies with stellar masses of ~10^5 - 10^7 solar masses inferred from abundance matching of the (sub)halo mass function to the observed galaxy mass function increase by a factor of ~2. In addition, we find that an important fraction of low-mass subhaloes are completely devoid of stars. Accounting for the presence of dark subhaloes below 10^10 solar masses further reduces the abundance of observable objects, and leads to an additional increase in the inferred stellar-to-total mass ratio by factors of 2 - 10 for galaxies in haloes of 10^9 - 10^10 solar masses. This largely reconciles the abundance matching results with the kinematics of individual dwarf galaxies in Lambda-CDM. We propose approximate corrections to the masses of objects derived from pure dark matter calculations to account for baryonic effects.
  • We use the Millennium I and II cosmological simulations to revisit the impact of mergers in the growth of bulges in central galaxies in the LCDM scenario. We seed galaxies within the growing CDM haloes using semi-empirical relations to assign stellar and gaseous masses, and an analytic treatment to estimate the transfer of stellar mass to the bulge of the remnant after a galaxy merger. We find that this model roughly reproduces the observed correlation between the bulge-to-total (B/T) mass ratio and stellar mass in present-day central galaxies as well as their observed demographics, although low-mass B/T<0.1 (bulgeless) galaxies might be scarce relative to the observed abundance. In our merger-driven scenario, bulges have a composite population made of (i) stars acquired from infalling satellites, (ii) stars transferred from the primary disc due to merger-induced perturbations, and (iii) newly formed stars in starbursts triggered by mergers. We find that (i) and (ii) are the main channels of mass assembly, with the first being dominant for massive galaxies, creating large bulges with different stellar populations than those of the inner discs, while the second is dominant for intermediate/low-mass galaxies creating small bulges with similar stellar populations to the inner discs. We associate the dominion of the first (second) channel to classical (pseudo) bulges, and compare the predicted fractions to observations. We remark that our treatment does not include other mechanisms of bulge growth such as intrinsic secular disc instabilities or misaligned gas accretion. We find that the evolution of the stellar and gaseous contents of the satellite as it moves towards the central galaxy is a key ingredient in setting the morphology of the remnant, and that a good match to the observed bulge demographics occurs when this evolution proceeds closely to that of the central galaxy.
  • The existence of an extended hot gaseous corona surrounding clusters, groups and massive galaxies is well established by observational evidence and predicted by current theories of galaxy formation. When a small galaxy collides with a larger one, their coronae are the first to interact, producing disturbances that remove gas from the smaller system and settle it into the corona of the larger one. For a Milky-Way-size galaxy merging into a low-mass group, ram pressure stripping and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are the most relevant of these disturbances. We argue that the turbulence generated by the latter mixes the material of both coronae in the wake of the orbiting satellite creating a "warm phase" mixture with a cooling time a factor of several shorter than that of the ambient intragroup gas. We reach this conclusion using analytic estimates, as well as adiabatic and dissipative high resolution numerical simulations of a spherical corona subject to the ablation process of a constant velocity wind with uniform density and temperature. Although this is a preliminary analysis, our results are promising and we speculate that the mixture could potentially trigger in situ star formation and/or be accreted into the central galaxy as a cold gas flow resulting in a new mode of star formation in galaxy groups and clusters.
  • The Fermi-LAT collaboration has recently reported the detection of angular power above the photon noise level in the diffuse gamma-ray background between 1 and 50 GeV. Such signal can be used to constrain a possible contribution from Dark-Matter-induced photons. We estimate the intensity and features of the angular power spectrum (APS) of this potential Dark Matter (DM) signal, for both decaying and annihilating DM candidates, by constructing template all-sky gamma-ray maps for the emission produced in the galactic halo and its substructures, as well as in extragalactic (sub)halos. The DM distribution is given by state-of-the-art N-body simulations of cosmic structure formation, namely Millennium-II for extragalactic (sub)halos, and Aquarius for the galactic halo and its subhalos. We use a hybrid method of extrapolation to account for (sub)structures that are below the resolution limit of the simulations, allowing us to estimate the total emission all the way down to the minimal self-bound halo mass. We describe in detail the features appearing in the APS of our template maps and we estimate the effect of various uncertainties such as the value of the minimal halo mass, the fraction of substructures hosted in a halo and the shape of the DM density profile. Our results indicate that the fluctuation APS of the DM-induced emission is of the same order as the Fermi-LAT APS, suggesting that one can constrain this hypothetical emission from the comparison with the measured anisotropy. We also quantify the uncertainties affecting our results, finding "theoretical error bands" spanning more than two orders of magnitude and dominated (for a given particle physics model) by our lack of knowledge of the abundance of low-mass (sub)halos.
  • (Abridged) The extragalactic background light (EBL) observed at multiple wavelengths is a promising tool to probe the nature of dark matter since it might contain a significant contribution from gamma-rays produced promptly by dark matter annihilation. Additionally, the electrons and positrons produced in the annihilation give energy to the CMB photons to populate the EBL with X-rays and gamma-rays. We here create full-sky maps of the radiation from both of these contributions using the high-resolution Millennium-II simulation. We use upper limits on the contributions of unknown sources to the EBL to constrain the intrinsic properties of dark matter using a model-independent approach that can be employed as a template to test different particle physics models (including those with a Sommerfeld enhancement). These upper limits are based on observations spanning eight orders of magnitude in energy (from soft X-rays measured by CHANDRA to gamma-rays measured by Fermi), and on expectations for the contributions from blazars and star forming galaxies. To exemplify this approach, we analyze a set of benchmark Sommerfeld-enhanced models that give the correct dark matter abundance, satisfy CMB constraints, and fit the cosmic ray spectra measured by PAMELA and Fermi without any contribution from local subhalos. We find that these models are in conflict with the EBL constraints unless the contribution of unresolved subhalos is small and the annihilation signal dominates the EBL. We conclude that provided the collisionless cold dark matter paradigm is accurate, even for conservative estimates of the contribution from unresolved subhalos and astrophysical backgrounds, the EBL is at least as sensitive a probe of these types of scenarios as the CMB. Our results disfavor an explanation of the positron excess measured by PAMELA based only on dark matter annihilation in the smooth Galactic halo.
  • We calculate how the relic density of dark matter particles is altered when their annihilation is enhanced by the Sommerfeld mechanism due to a Yukawa interaction between the annihilating particles. Maintaining a dark matter abundance consistent with current observational bounds requires the normalization of the s-wave annihilation cross section to be decreased compared to a model without enhancement. The level of suppression depends on the specific parameters of the particle model, with the kinetic decoupling temperature having the most effect. We find that the cross section can be reduced by as much as an order of magnitude for extreme cases. We also compute the mu-type distortion of the CMB energy spectrum caused by energy injection from such Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation. Our results indicate that in the vicinity of resonances, associated with bound states, distortions can be large enough to be excluded by the upper limit |mu|<9.0x10^(-5) found by the COBE/FIRAS experiment.
  • If dark matter is composed of neutralinos, one of the most exciting prospects for its detection lies in observations of the gamma-ray radiation created in pair annihilations between neutralinos, a process that may contribute significantly to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) radiation. We here use the high-resolution Millennium-II simulation of cosmic structure formation to produce the first full-sky maps of the expected radiation coming from extragalactic dark matter structures. Our map making procedure takes into account the total gamma-ray luminosity from all haloes and their subhaloes, and includes corrections for unresolved components of the emission as well as an extrapolation to the damping scale limit of neutralinos. Our analysis also includes a proper normalization of the signal according to a specific supersymmetric model based on minimal supergravity. The new simulated maps allow a study of the angular power spectrum of the gamma-ray background from dark matter annihilation, which has distinctive features associated with the nature of the annihilation process and may be detectable in forthcoming observations by the recently launched FERMI satellite. Our results are in broad agreement with analytic models for the gamma-ray background, but they also include higher-order correlations not readily accessible in analytic calculations and, in addition, provide detailed spectral information for each pixel. In particular, we find that difference maps at different energies can reveal cosmic large-scale structure at low and intermediate redshifts. If the intrinsic emission spectrum is characterized by an emission peak, cosmological tomography with gamma ray annihilation radiation is in principle possible.
  • If dark matter is composed of neutralinos, the gamma-ray radiation produced in their annihilation offers an attractive possibility for dark matter detection. This process may contribute significantly to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) radiation, which is being measured by the FERMI satellite with unprecedented sensitivity. Using the high-resolution Millennium-II simulation of cosmic structure formation we have produced the first full-sky maps of the expected contribution of dark matter annihilation to the EGB radiation. Our maps include a proper normalization of the signal according to a specific supersymmetric model based on minimal supergravity. The new simulated maps allow a study of the angular power spectrum of the gamma-ray background from dark matter annihilation, which has distinctive features associated with the nature of the annihilation process. Our results are in broad agreement with analytic models for the gamma-ray background, but they also include higher-order correlations not readily accessible in analytic calculations and, in addition, provide detailed spectral information for each pixel. In particular, we find that color maps combining different energies can reveal the cosmic large-scale structure at low and intermediate redshifts.
  • We present 3D hydrodynamical simulations of a precessing jet propagating inside a supernova remnant (SNR) shell, particularly applied to the W50-SS433 system in a search for the origin of its peculiar elongated morphology. Several runs were carried out with different values for the mass loss rate of the jet, the initial radius of the SNR, and the opening angle of the precession cone. We found that our models successfully reproduce the scale and morphology of W50 when the opening angle of the jets is set to 10$\degr$ or if this angle linearly varies with time. For these models, more realistic runs were made considering that the remnant is expanding into an interstellar medium (ISM) with an exponential density profile (as HI observations suggest). Taking into account all these ingredients, the large scale morphology of the W50-SS 433 system, including the asymmetry between the lobes (formed by the jet-SNR interaction), is well reproduced.