• Our understanding of correlated electron systems is vexed by the complexity of their interactions. Heavy fermion compounds are archetypal examples of this physics, leading to exotic properties that weave together magnetism, superconductivity and strange metal behavior. The Kondo semimetal CeSb is an unusual example where different channels of interaction not only coexist, but their physical signatures are coincident, leading to decades of debate about the microscopic picture describing the interactions between the $f$ moments and the itinerant electron sea. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we resonantly enhance the response of the Ce$f$-electrons across the magnetic transitions of CeSb and find there are two distinct modes of interaction that are simultaneously active, but on different kinds of carriers. This study is a direct visualization of how correlated systems can reconcile the coexistence of different modes on interaction - by separating their action in momentum space, they allow their coexistence in real space.
  • We have performed density functional theory calculation and tight binging analysis in order to investigate the mechanism for the giant Rashba-type spin splitting (RSS) observed in Bi/Ag(111). We find that local orbital angular momentum induces momentum and spin dependent charge distribution which results in spin-dependent hopping. We show that the spin-dependent interatomic-hopping in Bi/Ag(111) works as a strong effective field and induces the giant RSS, indicating that the giant RSS is driven by hopping, not by a uniform electric field. The effective field from the hopping energy difference amounts to be ~18 V/{\AA}. This new perspective on the RSS gives us a hint for the giant RSS mechanism in general and should provide a strategy for designing new RSS materials by controlling spin-dependence of hopping energy between the neighboring atomic layers.
  • The temperature-dependent evolution of the Kondo lattice is a long-standing topic of theoretical and experimental investigation and yet it lacks a truly microscopic description of the relation of the basic $f$-$d$ hybridization processes to the fundamental temperature scales of Kondo screening and Fermi-liquid lattice coherence. Here, the temperature-dependence of $f$-$d$ hybridized band dispersions and Fermi-energy $f$ spectral weight in the Kondo lattice system CeCoIn$_5$ is investigated using $f$-resonant angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) with sufficient detail to allow direct comparison to first principles dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) calculations containing full realism of crystalline electric field states. The ARPES results, for two orthogonal (001) and (100) cleaved surfaces and three different $f$-$d$ hybridization scenarios, with additional microscopic insight provided by DMFT, reveal $f$ participation in the Fermi surface at temperatures much higher than the lattice coherence temperature, $T^*\approx$ 45 K, commonly believed to be the onset for such behavior. The identification of a $T$-dependent crystalline electric field degeneracy crossover in the DMFT theory $below$ $T^*$ is specifically highlighted.
  • We investigate the evolution of magnetic properties as a function of hydrogen doping in iron based superconductor LaFeAsO$_{1-x}$H$_x$ using the dynamical mean-field theory combined with the density-functional theory. We find that two independent consequences of the doping, the increase of the electron occupation and the structural modification, have the opposite effects on the strength of electron correlation and magnetism, resulting in the minimum of the calculated magnetic moment around the intermediate doping level as a function of $x$. Our result provides a natural explanation for the puzzling recent experimental discovery of the two separated antiferromagnetic phases at low and high doping limits. Furthermore, the increase of orbital occupation and correlation strength with the doping results in reduced orbital polarization of $d_{xz/yz}$ orbitals and the enhanced role of $d_{xy}$ orbital in the magnetism at high doping levels, and their possible implications to the superconductivity are discussed in line with the essential role of the magnetism.
  • Iron oxide is a key compound to understand the state of the deep Earth. It has been believed that previously known oxides such as FeO and Fe2O3 will be dominant at the mantle conditions. However, recent observation of FeO2 shed another light to the composition of the deep lower mantle (DLM) and thus understanding of the physical properties of FeO2 will be critical to model DLM. Here, we report the electronic structure and structural properties of FeO2 by using density functional theory (DFT) and dynamic mean field theory (DMFT). The crystal structure of FeO2 is composed of Fe2+ and O2 2- dimers, where the Fe ions are surround by the octahedral O atoms. We found that the bond length of O2 dimer, which is very sensitive to the change of the Coulomb interaction U of Fe 3d orbital, plays an important role in determining the electronic structures. The band structures of DFT+DMFT show that the metal-insulator transition is driven by the change of U and pressure. We suggest that the correlation effect should be considered to correctly describe the physical properties of FeO2 compound.
  • We have investigated the valley degeneracy of MoS2 multilayers and its effect on thermoelectric properties. By modulating the layer thickness and external electric field, the hole valleys at {\Gamma} and K points in the highest energy valence band and the electron valleys at K and {\Sigma}min points in the lowest energy conduction band are shifted differently. The hole valley degeneracy is observed in MoS2 monolayer, while that of electron valley is in MoS2 bilayer and monolayer under the external electric field. By tuning the valley degeneracy, the Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity can be separately controlled, and the maximum power factor can be obtained in n-type (p-type) MoS2 monolayer with (without) the external electric field. We suggest that the transition metal dichalcogenides are good example to investigate the role of valley degeneracy in the thermoelectric and optical properties with the control of interlayer interaction and external electric field strength.
  • Strain control is one of the most promising avenues to search for new emergent phenomena in transition-metal-oxide films. Here, we investigate the strain-induced changes of electronic structures in strongly correlated LaNiO3 (LNO) films, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and the dynamical mean-field theory. The strongly renormalized eg-orbital bands are systematically rearranged by misfit strain to change its fermiology. As tensile strain increases, the hole pocket centered at the A point elongates along the kz-axis and seems to become open, thus changing Fermi-surface (FS) topology from three- to quasi-two-dimensional. Concomitantly, the FS shape becomes flattened to enhance FS nesting. A FS superstructure with Q1 = (1/2,1/2,1/2) appears in all LNO films, while a tensile-strained LNO film has an additional Q2 = (1/4,1/4,1/4) modulation, indicating that some instabilities are present in metallic LNO films. Charge disproportionation and spin-density-wave fluctuations observed in other nickelates might be their most probable origins.
  • Dimensionality control in the LaNiO3 (LNO) heterostructure has attracted attention due to its two-dimensional (2D) electronic structure was predicted to have an orbital ordered insulating ground state, analogous to that of the parent compound of high-Tc cuprate superconductors [P. Hansmann et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 016401 (2009)]. Here, we directly measured the electronic structure of LNO ultrathin films using in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We recognized the dimensional crossover of the electronic structure around 3-unit cells (UC)-thick LNO film and observed the orbital reconstruction. However, complete orbital ordering was not achieved. Instead, we observed that the Fermi surface nesting effect became strong in the 2D LNO ultrathin film. These results indicated that the orbital reconstruction should be described by taking into account the strong nesting effect to search for the novel phenomena, such as superconductivity in 2D LNO heterostructure. In addition, the APRES spectra showed that the Fermi surface existed down to a 1-UC-thick film, which showed insulating behavior in transport measurements. We suggested that the metal-insulator transition in the transport properties may originate from Anderson localization.
  • We have investigated correlated electronic structures and the phase diagram of electron-doped hydrocarbon molecular solids, based on the dynamical mean-field theory. We have found that the ground state of hydrocarbon-based superconductors such as electron-doped picene and coronene is a multi-band Fermi liquid, while that of non-superconducting electron-doped pentacene is a single-band Fermi liquid in the proximity of the metal-insulator transition. The size of the molecular orbital energy level splitting plays a key role in producing the superconductivity of electron-doped hydrocarbon solids. The multi-band nature of hydrocarbon solids would boost the superconductivity through the enhanced density of states at the Fermi level.
  • Low energy electronic structures in AMnBi2 (A=alkaline earths) are investigated using a first-principles calculation and a tight binding method. An anisotropic Dirac dispersion is induced by the checkerboard arrangement of A atoms above and below the Bi square net in AMnBi2. SrMnBi2 and CaMnBi2 have a different kind of Dirac dispersion due to the different stacking of nearby A layers, where each Sr (Ca) of one side appears at the overlapped (alternate) position of the same element at the other side. Using the tight binding analysis, we reveal the chirality of the anisotropic Dirac electrons as well as the sizable spin-orbit coupling effect in the Bi square net. We suggest that the Bi square net provides a platform for the interplay between anisotropic Dirac electrons and the neighboring environment such as magnetism and structural changes.
  • Based on the dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we have investigated the mechanism of high $T_c$ superconductivity in stoichiometric LiFeAs. The calculated spectrum is in excellent agreement with the observed ARPES measurement. The Fermi surface (FS) nesting, which is predicted in the conventional density functional theory method, is suppressed due to the orbital-dependent correlation effect with the DMFT method. We have shown that such marginal breakdown of the FS nesting is an essential condition to the spin-fluctuation mediated superconductivity, while the good FS nesting in NaFeAs induces a spin density wave ground state. Our results indicate that fully charge self-consistent description of the correlation effect is crucial in the description of the FS nesting-driven instabilities.
  • We have investigated the electronic structures and magnetic properties of of K3picene, which is a first hydrocarbon superconductor with high transition temperature T_c=18K. We have shown that the metal-insulator transition (MIT) is driven in K3picene by 5% volume enhancement with a formation of local magnetic moment. Active bands for superconductivity near the Fermi level E_F are found to have hybridized character of LUMO and LUMO+1 picene molecular orbitals. Fermi surfaces of K3picene manifest neither prominent nesting feature nor marked two-dimensional behavior. By estimating the ratio of the Coulomb interaction U and the band width W of the active bands near E_F, U/W, we have demonstrated that K3picene is located in the vicinity of the Mott transition.
  • We have investigated the electron correlation effect on the electronic structures and transport properties of the iron-based superconductors using the density functional theory (DFT) and dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). By considering the Fe 3d electron correlation using the DMFT, the bandwidth near the Fermi level is substantially suppressed compared to the conventional DFT calculation. Because of the different renormalization factors of each 3d orbital, the DMFT gives considerably reduced electrical anisotropy compared to the DFT results, which explains the unusually small anisotropic resistivity and superconducting property observed in the iron-based superconductors. We suggest that the electron correlation effect should be considered to explain the anisotropic transport properties of the general d/f valence electron system.
  • The in- and out-of-plane lower critical fields and magnetic penetration depths for LiFeAs were examined. The anisotropy ratio $\gamma_{H_{c1}}(0)$ is smaller than the expected theoretical value, and increased slightly with increasing temperature from 0.6$T_c$ to $T_c$. This small degree of anisotropy was numerically confirmed by considering electron correlation effect. The temperature dependence of the penetration depths followed a power law($\sim$$T^n$) below 0.3$T_c$, with $n$$>$3.5 for both $\lambda_{ab}$ and $\lambda_c$. Based on theoretical studies of iron-based superconductors, these results suggest that the superconductivity of LiFeAs can be represented by an extended $s_\pm$-wave due to weak impurity scattering effect. And the magnitudes of the two gaps were also evaluted by fitting the superfluid density for both the in- and out-of-plane to the two-gap model. The estimated values for the two gaps are consistent with the results of angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and specific heat experiments.
  • Phase diagram of electron and hole-doped SrFe2As2 single crystals is investigated using Co and Mn substitution at the Fe-sites. We found that the spin-density-wave state is suppressed by both dopants, but the superconducting phase appears only for Co (electron)-doping, not for Mn (hole)-doping. Absence of the superconductivity by Mn-doping is in sharp contrast to the hole-doped system with K-substitution at the Sr sites. Distinct structural change, in particular the increase of the Fe-As distance by Mn-doping is important to have a magnetic and semiconducting ground state as confirmed by first principles calculations. The absence of electron-hole symmetry in the Fe-site-doped SrFe2As2 suggests that the occurrence of high-Tc superconductivity is sensitive to the structural modification rather than the charge doping.